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Helping Your Patrons E-read
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Helping Your Patrons E-read

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Presented by Karen Mier on 28 February 2012 as part of the Big Talk From Small Libraries Conference.

Presented by Karen Mier on 28 February 2012 as part of the Big Talk From Small Libraries Conference.
http://nlcblogs.nebraska.gov/bigtalk

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  • We’ve been providing computer classes for about a year now; list is growing.People are coming to understand that we are available to answer computer and tech questions.Broadening out into e-reader territory was a natural fit.
  • Receiving questions – in person and by phoneStaff had little or no knowledge Basic understanding of OverDrive; only 1 staff had a Nook; couldn’t help patronsGrowing popularity of e-readers and OverDrive
  • We started learning about the e-readers and OverDrive from the OverDrive website and “Digital Help” from within the OverDrive program Nebraska Library Commission TrainingFull day trainingAble to work with Barnes & Noble Nook Color, Sony Reader Touch, Amazon Kindle, and Apple iPad Including sample exercisesOverDrive2 staff went to first training session, didn’t have much training on downloading from OverDrive3 staff went to second round of training, with improved infoDifferent staff liked different readers. Kindle First Generation – hard to get used to, didn’t show page numbers Color e-readers good for non-fiction and cover art, including some graphic novelsStressed registering device and Adobe Digital EditionsIn the fall, decided to buy e-readers. Waited for Kindle Simple Touch. Didn’t like Kindle First Generation.Made sure as many staff as possible saw the actual registration process.Took notes during registration process and added these to our handouts. Noted steps and differences between Kindle and Nook.
  • Google search found several online OverDrive tutorials. Considered adding themto our website, but they were all specific to a library or consortium, so decided no.Created “Get to Know your Nook or Kindle” – two 2-hour sessions Advertised locally; picked up by Omaha World-Herald Advised people to have devices powered up (first time takes several hours). Discovered that a few people were there to try to decide which e-reader to get. We expected to get questions about text size, but most of the questions were on downloads.Getting started Setup, authorizing device Kindle – authorized during the setup process (only once) Nook – authorized when you plug into the computer. Use the same email account to register or authorize all devices and software. Devices and Adobe Digital Editions can be deregistered and reregistered (Ctrl-Shift-D in ADE).Readers hold hundreds of books – 1000 on Nook Simple Touch, 1400 on Kindle Touch (Answers gleaned from Amazon and BN websites.)Battery life depends on your device and your reading habits – how often you read. The battery life on a Nook Simple Touch is 2 months based on one hour of reading daily.“your mileage may vary.” WiFi vs. 3G If you have a wireless router for your Internet access, you may be able to use WiFi in your home. If you are unsure if you have wireless in your home, have your e-reader check for a wireless connection. If it finds one, you’re ready to go; if it doesn’t find one, you’ll have to use a WiFi hotspot. CASE in point – someone with iPhone trying to download book to iPhone; came into library; iPhone naturally uses 3G or 4G, so I showed her how to force iPhone to look for a wifi connection; found library’s wifiDownloading e-booksDownload time depends on your connection and the book.Fiction will take less time to download because there are no graphics.Books with color pictures may take up to 5 minutes.Generally, choose WiFi for downloading; it’s faster than 3G.If you have a tablet or other e-reader with Internet capability, you can search for ebooks and download them without using a desktop or laptop.Where do you find ebooks? Online stores like Kindle Store and Nook Store Can store gift card numbers and amounts so purchases are automatically deducted from totals. Search on Kindle Touch doesn’t show prices in initial view, limited searching and sorting. May prefer searching online store on a pc. Nook allows “lend me” one time for each BN book; loan period is 2 weeks. Must use computer to find ebooks that aren’t from Amazon or BN stores if you don’t have Internet on your device. Free websites like Project Gutenberg (http://www.gutenberg.org/, 38,000 free ebooks, out of copyright and in multiple languages). Has simple search engine; can download books with or without images. OverDrive for library booksDownloading free library ebooks from OverDrive Go to the Plattsmouth Library’s website. If you own any e-reader other than the Kindle, you will need to download Adobe Digital Editions (ADE), which is linked on the bottom left of the screen in OverDrive. You will also need to register ADE (requires an email address). OverDrive Media Console is needed for Android, BlackBerry, iPhone/iPad, or Windows Phone 7 devices. If you want to limit your search to only items in a specific format (Kindle book or WMA audiobooks only, for instance), use Advanced Search. Checkout limits: You can only have 4 ebooks checked out at one time. If you have finished with some of the ebooks you have checked out, return them in order to check out more. Length of loan for ebooks – 7, 14, or 21 days. Holds: If a book you want does not have any copies currently available, place a hold on it. You will be prompted to enter your email address. When the title becomes available, you will receive an email from OverDrive. Screenshot.(Some e-readers capable of playing audiobooks – some may need separate apps, some have speakers.)
  • Patrons shared – info about a bar on Main St. that had free wifi; more experienced e-reader person might help a newbieSplit into two groups 1 staff demonstrated OverDrive and Project Gut. for Kindle owners 1 staff demonstrated the same for Nook owners Separate instructions in handout re: downloading and returning OverDrive books for Kindle vs NookOverDrive for Kindle – confirm cko, takes you to Amazon, sign in, click on Get Library Book (or USB) Return book from Manage Your Kindle; then delete it If loan ends before you return the book, also have to delete the notice from Kindle.OverDrive for Nook – confirm cko, opens in ADE, drag into Nook Return book in ADE, then delete it from library.Project Gutenberg for Kindle – save to pc, drag to Kindle’s Documents folder (can keep forever)Project Gutenberg for Nook – save to pc, drag to the root of the Nook (can keep forever)3rd staff helped register devices
  • More screen shots – had shot of advanced search in OverDrive, but no shots of ADE screen.Might have separate sessions for Nook and Kindle (different days/times) Didn’t know how many we would have (24 in each 2-hour session) Barnes & Noble reps have offered to help.Use LCD
  • New patron registrations - More patron registrations because they liked the program, need library card to use OverDriveNew perspective on the library - Public sees library in a different lightNew friends, supporters - stayed in the library long after presentation was overMore calls on e-readers - about 1 call/day nowCurrently, we’re providing help on one-on-one basis.

Helping Your Patrons E-read Helping Your Patrons E-read Presentation Transcript

  • Karen MierPlattsmouth Public Library, NE
  • Why Receiving questions Staff had little or no knowledge Growing popularity of e-readers and OverDrive
  • Preparation & Training OverDrive website and “Digital Help” from within the OverDrive program Nebraska Library Commission Training  Compared Barnes & Noble Nook Color, Sony Reader Touch, Amazon Kindle, and Apple iPad  OverDrive Buy e-readers and set them up  Involved many staff  Took notes
  • Classes for Patrons Getting started with your e-reader WiFi vs. 3G Downloading e-books  Online stores (Nook or Kindle)  Project Gutenberg (http://www.gutenberg.org/)  OverDrive (from our library’s website)  Adobe Digital Editions  OverDrive Media Console
  • Classes for Patrons (cont.) Patrons shared information Split into two groups – Kindle and Nook  Demonstrated OverDrive download  Demonstrated Project Gutenberg download Third staff person helped register devices
  • Improvements More screen shots Separate sessions Use an LCD
  • Benefits New patron registrations New perspective on the library New friends, supporters More calls on e-readers
  • Contact information Karen Mier Plattsmouth Public Library kmier@plattsmouth.org 402-296-4154 x23