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Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010
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Dewey Decimal Classification Session 3 - June 2010

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  • These are the same rules as for the rest of the standard subdivisions.
  • You’ll see from Table 1 that -09 is the standard subdivision for historical, geographical, and persons treatment.
  • This subdivision is broken down more specifically, and each of these can be subdivided more specifically. For example, the -093 to -099 range can get very specific, down to the level of specific towns. I should mention that a general historical treatment gets the subdivision -09, without further subdivision.
  • If you click on 092, you can read the notes for what should be classed here. Many libraries do not use Dewey for their biographies, but there is a way to do it, if you choose too.
  • You can see that there are a variety of ways to handle biographies.
  • There are more complete instructions in the manuals. If you are going to class biographies with Dewey numbers, you should be sure to read these instructions.
  • 093-099 are used for specific continents, countries, etc. Table 1 tells you to add to -09 a number from Table 2.
  • You’ll see in Table 2 that the subdivision 1 is for areas, regions, places in general.
  • Areas, regions, etc. is for more natural divisions – climate zones, etc. Space is also given a subdivision.
  • The subdivision for people is -092. In full Dewey, this can be subdivided further, but in abridged Dewey this is as far as you can go.
  • The third option in table 2 is for specific, continents, countries, etc. You can see that it is divided between the ancient world and the modern world.
  • For example, the subdivision -31 is for China in the ancient world.
  • While -51 is for China in the modern world.
  • The only one that is different than what we talked about with Table 1 last week is the last one. Since most of them are the same, we won’t spend a lot of time on all of them.
  • The base number for nursing is 610.73. The note says that standard subdivisions are allowed.
  • Since this is a general historical treatment, you only need to add -09 without consulting table 2 for further subdivision.
  • Are there questions about that example?
  • There is no heading just for one-room schools, so we class this book with schools and their activities at 371. Notice that a pattern is given for the standard subdivisions that is a variation. There are two zeros before the number. Historical and geographical treatment is at 371.009
  • Let’s go back to table 2 and look at the subdivisions for the modern world. Since our book deals with the Great Plains region of the United States, we want to look at North America.
  • And then United States
  • And then we have the options of specific states. And you might not necessarily know which of these the Great Plains fits in. You could click through all of them to read the notes,
  • Or you can browse for Great Plains in the relative index. This is something we haven’t seen before, but terms in the Tables show up in the relative index as well.
  • Clicking on that link takes us to table 2, subdivision -78, for the western United States, which tells us to class the Great Plains here.
  • Remember, all the numbers from Table 2 have 9 in front of them, so our number is 371.000978
  • We’ve determined that it should be classed with espionage.
  • The note says that standard subdivisions are used. You can see that in this case, the numbers for 093 through 099 have been built.
  • However, when we click on those numbers, we are instructed not to use them and instead class these works in 327.123-327.129
  • Basically, this is a case where we are told to drop the 09. According to the instructions, you add the number from Table 2, directly to the base number 327.12 Also, notice that this is a case in which you can add more than one subdivision. The note says to add the geographical subdivision and then further as follows. Since this is an encyclopedia, we do want to add another subdivision, but we’ll get to that in a minute.
  • According to Table 2, the correct subdivision is -47 for Russia
  • Now, we want to add the subdivision to indicate that it is an encyclopedia, which is -03
  • Remember, our note told us that there is a different pattern for the standard subdivisions, with 2 zeros before the number.
  • Questions about this example?
  • We look up hostels in the relative index and are directed to lodging (temporary housing).
  • Normally, hostels are classed here at 910.46, but there is a note that tells us that hostels in a specific country are classed at 913-919, plus 06.
  • The note here about table 2 tells you how these numbers were built, by adding to 91 the numbers from table 2. You’ll see a table at the bottom for adding subdivisions.
  • This is where the 06 for facilities for travelers comes from.
  • 46 is the subdivision for Spain, so we add that to the 91
  • Then we go back to our table and add the 06
  • 900 class is used for general geographical or historical treatment of a country.
  • When you are discussing the history of a country as a whole, you class it in the 900s. When you browse the relative index, you can see that time periods for some countries are listed.As a side note, you can see that these numbers are built using numbers from Table 2.
  • This book also involves Japanese history, so you should look up Japan, too. The time period that fits is 1868-1945. Also notice the heading for sino-japanese conflict, which means conflict between China and Japan.
  • Are there any questions about historical and geographical treatments, or table 2?
  • You’ll notice that works of literature can be classed here. Works of fiction can be assigned Dewey numbers, though many libraries choose not to use them.
  • Zeros are dropped for the standard subdivisions to build these numbers.
  • The other option is 810-890, literatures of specific languages.
  • Literature is classed by the language in which it is written.
  • Once you have the base number from the 800s, you can add numbers from Table 3 to more accurately describe your item.
  • There are quite a bit of instructions here; I would recommend reading them on your own.
  • What you will probably use the most is the subdivisions for various forms of literature. They are found in 1-9. Notice the table of preference at the bottom – if you have more than one form, use this to determine which subdivision to use.
  • There is a table telling you how to add standard subdivisions after these form subdivisions. Use them when instructed to.
  • The manual will tell you how to determine the author’s language and national affiliation.
  • 800 numbers for abridged Dewey are pretty simple; the process is shortened a lot from what it is in full Dewey. There are a few different options that we are going to cover. These are the ones for a book with a single author.
  • There are also various options for books with multiple authors.
  • The number is built for you in the schedules; 843 for French fiction.
  • The note says that the number was built according to instructions in Table 3.
  • Let’s look at Table 3 anyway, just so you are familiar with the number building process.If you go up one level, you’ll see the note that tells you to add to base number the numbers from Table 3.
  • You can see that table 3 tells you that the subdivision for fiction is 3.
  • One thing to remember about Dewey numbers for literature is that works about an author and works by and author are classed together.
  • So both of these books are classed at 843.
  • Are there any questions about works with one author?
  • This is American literature in English, and it is poetry, so we go with 811
  • This is limited to a specific time period, so we are done. (There are numbers for time periods in full Dewey, but not in abridged Dewey.) If the time period is not limited, then we use subdivisions to further divide the number. -08 for collections, -09 for critiques, or any of the standard subdivisions.
  • If you click on 808.81-808.88, you can see that these numbers are built for you.
  • Instructions on how these numbers were built are given in the notes, and standard subdivisions can be added after these numbers.
  • If you go to table 3, instructions will tell you how to build the 808 numbers – class collections of literary texts in -08.
  • The table tells you that this subdivision is used for works by more than one author.
  • Just as a quick aside, the subdivision -09 in table 3 is used for works about more than one author.
  • Are there any questions about the 800s and table 3?
  • There was a typo in this slide in the handouts. It said table 3 instead of table 4.
  • There is no division between American and other English the way there is in literature.
  • Table 4 lists the various types of subdivisions for languages.
  • Some of the most common subdivisions are 1-5.
  • We’re going to use the base number 42- since the book is about English. The numbers have been built for you, so 427 is the number for historical and geographic variations, and modern variations.
  • You could build the number yourself using table 4. Also, the table is where you will find the note that tells you what is included in this category, such as slang, which is what this book is about.
  • You’ll see that the schedule tells you how to build the number.
  • 46- is the base number, for Spanish.
  • 461 is for writing systems, and the note tells you how the number was built.
  • The note on this screen tells you that the numbercomes from table 4.
  • You have to know that 1-5, standard form of the language, is what you are looking for.
  • The note under 1 in Table 4 says that writing systems includes alphabets.
  • Are there any questions about Table 4 and the 400s?
  • Transcript

    • 1. Dewey Decimal Classification
      Session 3
      June 22, 2010
      Emily Dust Nimsakont
      PowerPoint by Devra Dragos; Revised by Emily Dust Nimsakont
    • 2. Topics
      Session 3
      Tables 1 (-09) and 2 and 900 class
      Table 3 and 800 class
      Table 4 and 400 class
    • 3. Standard Subdivisions
      Optional
      Recommended for large number of items within specific topics
    • 4. Abridged DDC Tables
      Table 1. Standard Subdivisions
      Table 2. Geographic Areas and Persons
      Table 3. Subdivisions for Individual Literatures, for Specific Literary Forms
      Table 4. Subdivisions for Individual Languages
    • 5. Table 1. Standard Subdivisions:Facets
      Format (e.g. dictionary, serial, catalog)
      Approach/Viewpoint of author (e.g. history, philosophy, criticism of a work)
      People (e.g. women, gifted persons)
      Location (e.g. torrid zone, Greater London) in conjunction with Table 2
      Biographical content
    • 6. When may numbers be added from Table 2-Geographic Areas and Persons?
      Subdivisions may be added indirectly from Table 2 through Table 1 -09 or as directed through the Schedules at any time, unless:
      the Schedules forbid it
      the topic of the book is only part of the number or is given “standing room” only (Listed as “Including”)
      there are certain restrictions specified in the Schedules
      it would be redundant
    • 7.
    • 8.
    • 9.
    • 10.
    • 11.
    • 12.
    • 13.
    • 14.
    • 15.
    • 16.
    • 17.
    • 18.
    • 19.
    • 20.
    • 21.
    • 22.
    • 23. Variations in adding subdivisions
      Add subdivision as is from Table
      Drop lead zero after an existing zero
      Retain lead zero after an existing zero
      Add a lead zero
      Drop lead zero and 9
    • 24. Classify book…
      Trends in Nursing History
    • 25.
    • 26. Classify book…
      Trends in Nursing History
      Classify with Nursing and services of allied health personnel: 610.73
    • 27.
    • 28. Classify book…
      Trends in Nursing History
      Classify with Nursing and services of allied health personnel: 610.7309
    • 29. Classify book…
      Little School on the Prairie: A History of One-Room Rural Schools in the Great Plains Region
    • 30.
    • 31. Classify book…
      Little School on the Prairie: A History of One-Room Rural Schools in the Great Plains Region
      Classify with Schools and their activities: 371.009
    • 32.
    • 33.
    • 34.
    • 35.
    • 36.
    • 37. Classify book…
      Little School on the Prairie: A History of One-Room Rural Schools in the Great Plains Region
      Classify with Schools and their activities: 371.00978
    • 38. Classify book…
      Sleepers: An Encyclopedia of Soviet Union Spycraft
    • 39.
    • 40. Classify book…
      Sleepers: An Encyclopedia of Soviet Union Spycraft
      Classify with Espionage and subversion: 327.12
    • 41.
    • 42.
    • 43.
    • 44.
    • 45. Classify book…
      Sleepers: An Encyclopedia of Soviet Union Spycraft
      Classify with Espionage and subversion: 327.1247
    • 46.
    • 47.
    • 48. Classify book…
      Sleepers: An Encyclopedia of Soviet Union Spycraft
      Classify with Espionage and subversion: 327.1247003
    • 49. Classify book…
      A Guide to Hostels in Spain
    • 50.
    • 51.
    • 52.
    • 53.
    • 54. Classify book…
      A Guide to Hostels in Spain
      Classify with Geography of and travel…: 91
    • 55.
    • 56. Classify book…
      A Guide to Hostels in Spain
      Classify with Geography of and travel…: 914.6
    • 57.
    • 58. Classify book…
      A Guide to Hostels in Spain
      Classify with Geography of and travel…: 914.606
    • 59. Classify book…
      Decades of Change: A History of Ghana, 1960-2000
    • 60.
    • 61.
    • 62.
    • 63. Classify book…
      Decades of Change: A History of Ghana, 1960-2000
      Classify with: 966.705
    • 64. Table 3. Subdivisions for Individual Literatures, for Specific Literary Forms
      Subdivisions from Table 3 pertain only to the 800 Literature Class (810-888)
      Subdivisions are added as instructed in the Schedules and the Table
    • 65.
    • 66.
    • 67.
    • 68.
    • 69.
    • 70.
    • 71.
    • 72.
    • 73.
    • 74.
    • 75.
    • 76. Works by or about…
      One author writing in one language and in one form
      One author writing in one language containing multiple forms
      One author writing in more than one language
      One author who changed citizenship
    • 77. Works by or about…
      Multiple authors writing in one language and in one form
      Multiple authors writing in one language containing multiple forms
      Multiple authors writing in two languages
      Multiple authors writing in more than two languages
    • 78. Works by or about one author writing in one language and in one form
      Determine the language/literature in which the author wrote
      Find the applicable base number in the Schedules
      In the case of English language, choose 81- or 82- depending on the citizenship of the author
    • 79. Works by or about one author writing in one language and in one form
      Determine the form of the work and find applicable form number in Table 3 and add to base number (Most of the languages already have the numbers built in the Schedules)
      You are done!
      One exception: William Shakespeare has his own number – 822.3
    • 80. Classify book…
      From the Center of the Earth to the Moon: Travels with Jules Verne (critique of Verne’s works)
    • 81.
    • 82.
    • 83.
    • 84.
    • 85.
    • 86. Classify book…
      From the Center of the Earth to the Moon: Travels with Jules Verne (critique of Verne’s works)
      Classify with French fiction: 843
    • 87. Classify books…
      Twenty Thousand Leagues under the Sea (novel by Jules Verne)
      Classify with French fiction: 843
      Jules Verne: The Inventor of Science Fiction (biography)
      Classify with French fiction: 843
    • 88. Works by or about one author writing in one language containing multiple forms
      Determine the language/literature and find appropriate base number in 800 Schedules
      Determine the form the author is chiefly known for, find applicable form number in Table 3, and add to base number
    • 89. Works by or about one author writing in more than one language
      Determine the language used last by the author and find appropriate base number in 800 schedules, unless the other language is predominant
      Follow step 2 in previous instructions based on one or more forms
    • 90. Works by or about one author who changed citizenship
      This affects literature written in English only – use the literature number for the author’s adopted citizenship
      Follow step 2 in previous instructions based on one or more forms
    • 91. Works by or about multiple authors writing in one language and in one form
      Determine the language/literature and find appropriate base number in 800 Schedules
      Determine the form, find appropriate number in Table 3, and add to base number
      Determine if the contents are limited by time period or specific genre.
      If so, you are done!
    • 92. Classify book…
      Nebraska’s Homefront in Rhyme: A Collection of World War II Poetry (by multiple Nebraska poets)
    • 93.
    • 94.
    • 95. Classify book…
      Nebraska’s Homefront in Rhyme: A Collection of World War II Poetry (by multiple Nebraska poets)
      Classify with American poetry in English: 811
    • 96. Works by or about multiple authors writing in one language using multiple forms
      Determine the language/literature and consider using the base number, e.g. 810
      Determine if the contents are limited by time period or a specific genre
      If so, you are done!
    • 97. Works by or about multiple authors writing in two languages
      Determine the language/literature and use the one coming first in the Schedules as the base number, unless otherwise instructed
      Determine the form, find appropriate number in Table 3, and add to base number
      Determine if the contents are limited by the time period or specific genre
      If so, you are done!
    • 98. Works by or about multiple authors writing in more than two languages
      See Schedules at 808.8: Collections of literary texts from more than two literatures
      Determine the form and add to 808.8 the proper number following 808 in 808.1-808.7
    • 99.
    • 100.
    • 101.
    • 102.
    • 103.
    • 104. Number Building for 800s in Full DDC
      Formula = 8 + Language/Literature + Form + Time period + (--08 or –09) + Feature/Theme/Persons + Geographical area
    • 105. Classify book…
      Women’s Words, Women’s Works: An Anthology of Contemporary Austrian Plays by Women
      Subject headings:
      • Austrian drama – 20th century – Translations into English
      • 106. Austrian drama – Women authors – Translations into English
    • Women’s Words, Women’s Works
      83 Literatures of Germanic Languages
      2 Drama
      914 1945-1990
      08 Anthology
      09287 Women
      09436 Austria and Liechtenstein
      Classify in Full Dewey as 832.914080928709436
    • 107. Classify book…
      Women’s Words, Women’s Works: An Anthology of Contemporary Austrian Plays by Women
      Classify in Abridged Dewey as 832
      Subdivision -08 cannot be added to define collection because the works are from limited time period
    • 108. Table 4. Subdivisions for Individual Languages
      Subdivisions from Table 4 pertain only to 400 Language Class
      Subdivisions are added as instructed in the Schedules and the Table
      Language subdivision -3 takes the place of standard subdivision -03 for dictionaries in the 400 Schedules, e.g. Webster’s Dictionary would be at 423, not 420.3
      Subdivision -5 Grammar is for linguists while subdivision -8 Standard usage of the language is for students learning the rules of grammar
    • 109.
    • 110.
    • 111.
    • 112.
    • 113. Classify book…
      Get Along Li’l Doggies: Translating Those Cowboy Expressions
    • 114.
    • 115.
    • 116.
    • 117. Classify book…
      Get Along Li’l Doggies: Translating Those Cowboy Expressions
      Classify with English…Historical and geographic variations…: 427
    • 118. Classify book…
      El Alfabeto(Gives illustrated sentences for the letters of the Spanish alphabet.)
    • 119.
    • 120.
    • 121.
    • 122.
    • 123.
    • 124. Classify book…
      El Alfabeto(Gives illustrated sentences for the letters of the Spanish alphabet.)
      Classify with: 461
    • 125. Assignment
      http://www.nlc.state.ne.us/netserv/training/
      onlinesessions/DDCsummer2010/dewey.html
      Due by 10 AM, Tuesday, June 29, 2010

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