• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
The Ubhave Project (Part 1/2)
 

The Ubhave Project (Part 1/2)

on

  • 407 views

Invited talk at the 2nd ACM Conference on Mobile Systems for Computational Social Science #ubicom13

Invited talk at the 2nd ACM Conference on Mobile Systems for Computational Social Science #ubicom13

Statistics

Views

Total Views
407
Views on SlideShare
396
Embed Views
11

Actions

Likes
2
Downloads
0
Comments
0

1 Embed 11

https://twitter.com 11

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    The Ubhave Project (Part 1/2) The Ubhave Project (Part 1/2) Presentation Transcript

    • Ubiquitous and Social Computing for Positive Behaviour Change
    • UBHave's ...aim is to investigate the power and challenges of using mobile phones and social networking for Digital Behaviour Change Interventions (DBCIs), and to contribute to creating a scientifc foundation for digitally supported behaviour change.
    • Digital Behaviour Change Interventions ...focus on delivering relevant information via digital means (e.g., a web site) in order to support intents to change behaviour
    • Monitor Learn Deliver Mobile Intervention “Smartphones for Large-Scale Behaviour Change Interventions”. IEEE Pervasive 2013.
    • “ Study fndings suggested that young, currently healthy adults have some interest in apps that attempt to support health-related behaviour change [...] The ability to record and track behaviour and goals and the ability to acquire advice and information “on the go” were valued. Context-sensing capabilities and social media features tended to be considered unnecessary and off-putting.” “Opportunities and Challenges for Smartphone Applications in Supporting Health Behavior Change: Qualitative Study” Dennison et. al
    • “...They predicted that context-triggered advice and suggestions would produce counterproductive effects by drawing attention towards unhealthy but attractive behaviour choices.” “Opportunities and Challenges for Smartphone Applications in Supporting Health Behavior Change: Qualitative Study” Dennison et. al
    • Monitor Learn Deliver Mobile Intervention Design
    • ● User Interface and interaction: – Diaries – Menus – Information – Questionnaires – Feedback ● Sensor data collection ● Context triggering Towards a framework... Generic components for mobile apps:
    • { “intervention_id”:”my_intervention”, “questions”: [ … ] “diary”: [ …] “sensors”: [ …], “trigger”:[ {“accelerometer”:”moving”, “survey”:”physical_activity”} ] } ...that can be 'authored' Using well-known mobile app design patterns Native app's benefts, web apps' benefts:
    • ● Questionnaires ● Feedback ● Sensor data collection & management – “Open Source Smartphone Libraries for Computational Social Science” MCSS 2013. Part of the path so far... Mostly measurement. (experience sampling) Building from a subset of the functionality:
    • Emotion Sense
    • ● How can we keep users engaged in a seemingly repetitive task? – Diversify and sample from the questions as a “journey” of unlocking feedback – User needs vs. research needs ● How can we effciently collect sensor data? – First deployment took a naïve approach – Current implementation focuses on CPU time rather than sensor strategy Design Challenges
    • “sensor duty cycling”
    • Sensor & Emotion Data
    • “Can I run an ESM study like Emotion Sense?” Generalise sensor- enhanced experience sampling tool. Currently in alpha testing.
    • Smartphone Libraries: Sensing, Triggers, Data Management Emotion Sense Easy M Sensing Apps & ESM Research towards ubhave's intervention framework Research