Kate Stone, Manager, NFSA Online Twitter  @kate__stone @NFSAonline @australiascreen National Digital Forum  Wellington, NZ...
What happens when a website moves from one organisational to another ?
What happens when a website moves from one organisational to another ? Do the users change because the organisation has a ...
What happens when a website moves from one organisational to another ? Do the users change because the organisation has a ...
<ul><li>Policy ticks </li></ul><ul><li>Portfolio partnerships </li></ul><ul><li>Broadband content </li></ul><ul><li>Digita...
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Change of government, portfolio restructure 2007
Film Finance Corporation 2008
I’m not in Kansas anymore
 
Film industry  Cultural sector  Business oriented Corporate plan: bums on seats and eyeballs on screens ‘ screen culture’ ...
…  excite curiosity & inspire creativity through online access to Australian audiovisual heritage Why can’t I view whole f...
…  excite curiosity & inspire creativity through online access to Australian audiovisual heritage Why can’t I view whole f...
…  excite curiosity & inspire creativity through online access to Australian audiovisual heritage Why can’t I view whole f...
…  excite curiosity & inspire creativity through online access to Australian audiovisual heritage Why can’t I view whole f...
<ul><li>What australianscreen doesn’t do for NFSA </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Only 2000 items vs 1.4 million collection items </...
Users haven’t changed
Solutions STATUS QUO Leave it as it is – primarily a curated overview of professional screen output ADD ALL THE OTHER STUF...
Over 60 sound titles now on australianscreen
Integrate it with collection search <ul><li>Data v context </li></ul><ul><li>“ The two cultures of the contemporary world ...
australianscreen is curated  - it is a selection only - it is context rich with statements of significance.
Legislated to be curatorial <ul><li>Section 3 of the NFSA Act </li></ul><ul><li>  In performing its functions, the Nationa...
Collection search australianscreen  picturesque
 
Sit forward … picturesque
Sit forward …  Lean back …  Navigation mode: Search & Filter to access specific resources Navigation mode: Browse, explore...
Sit forward …  Lean back …  Navigation mode: Search & Filter to access specific resources Positioning:  In-depth catalogue...
Sit forward …  Lean back …  Navigation mode: Search & Filter to access specific resources Positioning:  Archival catalogue...
Search = Mad Max
 
 
 
Location maps – a tool for industry or a tool for historical reflection?
 
 
Near me – location-based content
Watch Share Mobile video and social media
Can australianscreen do justice to 1.4 million collection items?
Maybe it doesn’t have to
There are other ways to represent the stills documents and artefacts collections
Solutions STATUS QUO Leave australianscreen as it is – primarily a curated overview of professional screen output ADD ALL ...
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What happens when a website moves from an industry agency to an archive? Kate Stone, australianscreen

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  • This story starts in 2005, when the Australian government funded the Film Commission to build a website to showcase the professional output of the Australian film industry and promote Australian screen culture. It was also to to deliver a media rich learning resource to the education sector.
  • The result was a kind of Australian NZ On Screen. The site was launched in 2007. It showcases the work of Australian film and television creators. It includes materials from the collections of the NFSA and its partners , ABC, SBS, the National Archives of Australia and the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies – as well as numerous independent production companies. There are currently around 1600 titles spanning from 1896 to the present day and new titles are being added every week. It includes materials from the collections of the NFSA and its partners , ABC, SBS, the National Archives of Australia and the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies – as well as numerous independent production companies. There are currently around 1600 titles spanning from 1896 to the present day and new titles are being added every week. Almost every piece of metadata attached to each title on the site is a link and I’m going to describe how that creates connections between titles to offer journeys though the site. NEXT
  • One of my favourite ways of browsing the site is by slowly scrolling down a list of ‘all titles from a particular decade. It gives great overview of what was going on in Australia at the time – what we were watching on TV, what was happening in the news – which in turn provides a valuable historical context for the works themselves to be presented in.
  • This page gives an overview of these exploration paths – telling visitors that they can explore alphabetically, by decade or timeline, by maps, by title type – we have features, documentaries, home movies, newsreels, advertisements and others, by genre … and by tags NEXT
  •   You can also search using a Google search which sits alongside tabs to search by titles, all people or all tags.
  • Subject specialists are commissioned to write notes and select video or audio excerpts to represent the work. There is also a list of key credits, where to find a copy and many titles have a location map showing where the title was recorded or where a fiction film was set. Metadata accompanying every title includes Date, aspect ratio, original film and literature classification, production company, collection source, title type, genre or genres and tags. The summary text just below the title is called a teaser and is 140 characters long for easy tweeting. The teaser, along with a still frame selected from a clip, the title date and title type eg feature film, all accompany form the portable ‘title record’ wherever it appears in dynamically created lists across the site.
  • We partnered with Education Services Australia who selected clips for their curriculum relevance and wrote teacher notes. curators clip notes.
  • This is the education landing page which re-presents the clips from titles on the site under curriculum headings.
  • Tags are nominated by the people writing the curators notes, but then when we add the title the website, we standardise the terms nominated, using the Schools Online Thesaurus – SCOTS terms which are in our CMS. So if a curators nominates ‘parties’ we could add parties to tags but we would also add ‘celebrations’. This way the site shares metadata with Education Services Australia and the tens of thousand other digital resources that they publish and distribute through school intranets all over Australia.
  • And they are keeping the curriculum metadata up to date as the new national curriculum is developed so that teachers will be able to find australianscreen education resources in these distribution systems, under the new curriculum headings.
  • Here is a bit of a comparison that highlights the differences between these two major information tools that we offer online. There’s some handwringing that goes on by people wishing the collection search tool could be more like ASO. Certainly we are working on improving its user interface. But I am committed to something even more important than its ‘look and feel’ and that’s what’s happening in the backend. I’d like the NFSA to have a collection search that resembles ASO in having clean, exportable, sharable data, discoverable data.
  • There’s a strange phenomenon you might be familiar with, where the more you offer online the higher people’s expectations seems to grow.
  • People come to our websites looking for a film to borrow for personal use, for school screenings, or broadcast programming
  • … or maybe wanting to research a music doctorate…
  • … or because they’re looking for archival material for their latest new film
  • Because people like creating dichotomies, I’ll offer this one – “Data versus narrative”’ I find it useful to think about the two key ways that you can put to use your digitised content. Use your warehouse – the data – or build a boutique – the narrative. I think we need to do both. Some people might prefer this (stories website SLIDE) to this (SLIDE open data)
  • So now the NFSA has two main ways that the NFSA offers information about audiovisual archives are through our ‘Search the Collection’ database, and australianscreen online.
  • This is our public facing collection search. It is a subset of the database that records and manages the NFSA’s 1.4 million collection items
  • Here is a bit of a comparison that highlights the differences between these two major information tools that we offer online. There’s some handwringing that goes on by people wishing the collection search tool could be more like ASO. Certainly we are working on improving its user interface. But I am committed to something even more important than its ‘look and feel’ and that’s what’s happening in the backend. I’d like the NFSA to have a collection search that resembles ASO in having clean, exportable, sharable data, discoverable data.
  • If you search for the film Mad Max in Search the collection, you will be offered hundreds of records that all represent a physical collection item.
  • We’re developing a new online search that is ‘Collection Search Plus’ –which aggregates collection records, lending library records, australianscreen as well as other education digital resources we have online.
  • Much as I’d like to say I had the foresight to predict its application on mobile computing 6 years down the track, adding location data to Australianscreen was the steak knives offered by the developer Thomas Ashelford. He just said one day ‘You know something that’d be really easy and quite fun, we could add location maps’. I thought it would be a good tool for the film production sector.
  • We are just in the process of launching ASO mobile – it’s a mobile version of the website – not an app – that emphasises the location maps through a ‘near me’ button that will produce either a map or a list of all titles in your current location. Here’s a list of titles near here.
  • The National Film and Sound Archive is a federal government agency, Canberra based, with over 200 employees.
  • What happens when a website moves from an industry agency to an archive? Kate Stone, australianscreen

    1. 1. Kate Stone, Manager, NFSA Online Twitter @kate__stone @NFSAonline @australiascreen National Digital Forum Wellington, NZ, November 2011 No longer at this address
    2. 2. What happens when a website moves from one organisational to another ?
    3. 3. What happens when a website moves from one organisational to another ? Do the users change because the organisation has a different corporate plan ?
    4. 4. What happens when a website moves from one organisational to another ? Do the users change because the organisation has a different corporate plan ? What does an archive need in a website that a film funding agency doesn’t ?
    5. 5. <ul><li>Policy ticks </li></ul><ul><li>Portfolio partnerships </li></ul><ul><li>Broadband content </li></ul><ul><li>Digital access to Australian culture </li></ul><ul><li>Education </li></ul>2005
    6. 18. Change of government, portfolio restructure 2007
    7. 19. Film Finance Corporation 2008
    8. 20. I’m not in Kansas anymore
    9. 22. Film industry Cultural sector Business oriented Corporate plan: bums on seats and eyeballs on screens ‘ screen culture’ programs = get more people watching Australian films Government oriented Corporate plan: change the world and make it a better place ‘ screen culture’ programs = provide insight into the human condition and make the world a better place picturesque
    10. 23. … excite curiosity & inspire creativity through online access to Australian audiovisual heritage Why can’t I view whole films on your website?! You can’t put that online, it should only be seen in a cinema! Can I use this in my mash up?
    11. 24. … excite curiosity & inspire creativity through online access to Australian audiovisual heritage Why can’t I view whole films on your website?! You can’t put that online, it should only be seen in a cinema! Can I use this in my mash up? I want to borrow Mad Max
    12. 25. … excite curiosity & inspire creativity through online access to Australian audiovisual heritage Why can’t I view whole films on your website?! You can’t put that online, it should only be seen in a cinema! Can I use this in my mash up? I want to borrow Mad Max I want to research Indigenous Country & western music
    13. 26. … excite curiosity & inspire creativity through online access to Australian audiovisual heritage Why can’t I view whole films on your website?! You can’t put that online, it should only be seen in a cinema! Can I use this in my mash up? I want to research Indigenous Country & western music I want to find 50s and 60s footage of families and cars for my documentary series I want to borrow Mad Max
    14. 27. <ul><li>What australianscreen doesn’t do for NFSA </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Only 2000 items vs 1.4 million collection items </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>It doesn’t represent ‘The NFSA Collection’ but many audiovisual collections </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Not represent sound, documents and artefacts </li></ul></ul><ul><li>That’s not to forget </li></ul><ul><li>What do australianscreen’s audiences want </li></ul>
    15. 28. Users haven’t changed
    16. 29. Solutions STATUS QUO Leave it as it is – primarily a curated overview of professional screen output ADD ALL THE OTHER STUFF Leave it as it is and add other collection types – we’ve started to add sound. CHANGE IT Scale back the contextualisation and integrate it with the collection search
    17. 30. Over 60 sound titles now on australianscreen
    18. 31. Integrate it with collection search <ul><li>Data v context </li></ul><ul><li>“ The two cultures of the contemporary world are the culture of data and the culture of narrative.” </li></ul><ul><li>– William Germano </li></ul><ul><li>http://chronicle.com/article/What-Are-Books-Good-For-/124563/ </li></ul>
    19. 32. australianscreen is curated - it is a selection only - it is context rich with statements of significance.
    20. 33. Legislated to be curatorial <ul><li>Section 3 of the NFSA Act </li></ul><ul><li>  In performing its functions, the National Film and Sound Archive is to: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>place an emphasis on the historical and cultural significance of programs and related material; and </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>apply the highest curatorial standards </li></ul></ul>
    21. 34. Collection search australianscreen picturesque
    22. 36. Sit forward … picturesque
    23. 37. Sit forward … Lean back … Navigation mode: Search & Filter to access specific resources Navigation mode: Browse, explore, interact, share picturesque
    24. 38. Sit forward … Lean back … Navigation mode: Search & Filter to access specific resources Positioning: In-depth catalogue Navigation mode: Browse, explore, interact, share Positioning: Exhibition space picturesque
    25. 39. Sit forward … Lean back … Navigation mode: Search & Filter to access specific resources Positioning: Archival catalogue Access high quality copies Around 750,000 records Navigation mode: Browse, explore, interact, share Positioning: Exhibition space Download watermarked low res Less than 2,000 records picturesque
    26. 40. Search = Mad Max
    27. 44. Location maps – a tool for industry or a tool for historical reflection?
    28. 47. Near me – location-based content
    29. 48. Watch Share Mobile video and social media
    30. 49. Can australianscreen do justice to 1.4 million collection items?
    31. 50. Maybe it doesn’t have to
    32. 51. There are other ways to represent the stills documents and artefacts collections
    33. 52. Solutions STATUS QUO Leave australianscreen as it is – primarily a curated overview of professional screen output ADD ALL THE OTHER STUFF Leave it as it is and add other collection types – we’ve started to add sound. CHANGE IT Strip back the contextualisation and integrate it with the collection search ANY SUGGESTIONS?
    34. 53. Thank you

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