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Towards a database of Maori and Moriori taonga in overseas museums Philip Edgar, Te Papa, and Paul Tapsell
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Towards a database of Maori and Moriori taonga in overseas museums Philip Edgar, Te Papa, and Paul Tapsell

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  • 1.
    • Towards a Database of Taonga in Museums outside New Zealand
    • Paul Tapsell
    • University of Otago
    • Philip Edgar
    • Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa
    • Arapata Hakiwai
    • Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa
    • National Digital Forum, Wellington, 2011
    Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa
  • 2. Prow from a war canoe (tuere) AN993278001 Oc1900,0721.1 © The Trustees of the British Museum British Museum, London
  • 3.
    • To establish a database of Māori and Moriori taonga held in museums outside New Zealand bringing these treasures together in an online environment, to
      • make them and the information about them more readily accessible to Māori and Moriori
      • help to restore connections and relationships with the taonga
      • create a platform to share knowledge about them with those who care for them now
  • 4. Taonga outside New Zealand Treasure Box (Papahou) 1978.412.755a, b The Michael C. Rockefeller Memorial Collection, Purchase, Nelson A. Rockefeller Gift, 1960 Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
  • 5. Taonga outside New Zealand
    • 25 countries
    • 168 institutions
    • 17,750 taonga
  • 6. Taonga worldwide
  • 7.  
  • 8.  
  • 9.  
  • 10. National Museums Scotland British Museum Pitt Rivers Museum, Oxford Manchester Museum Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, Cambridge
  • 11.  
  • 12. Field Museum Field Museum American Museum of Natural History National Museum of Natural History Bishop Museum, Hawaii Peabody Essex Museum Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology
  • 13. The Australian Museum South Australian Museum Queensland Museum Museum Victoria
  • 14. What's available online now?
  • 15. What's available online now?
    • 57 of 168 institutions have published Māori Taonga online (34%)
    • 7,700 (43%) M ā ori Taonga catalogue records online
    • 3,200 (18%) have one or more images available online
    • 90% of the digitised M ā ori Taonga available online are in 10 institutions
  • 16. To what standard? Door lintel (Pare or Korupe) 61.126 Creative Commons-BY-NC Brooklyn Museum, New York
  • 17. To what standard?
    • Variable in terms of
      • Documentation
      • Digitisation
      • Data access
  • 18. Interest from overseas museums
  • 19. Interest from overseas museums
    • Motivating factors
      • to provide access
      • to develop relationships
      • to learn
      • incentive to digitise
  • 20. Who can we learn from?
  • 21. Who can we learn from?
      • Reciprocal Research Network (RRN)
      • First Nation communities of the Northwest Coast and British Columbia
      • Museum of Anthropology, British Columbia
    • Great Lakes Research Alliance (GRASAC)
      • Peoples of the Great Lakes
      • Carleton University, Ottawa
    • Plateau Peoples Web Portal
      • Umatilla, Coeur d'Alene and Yakama nations
      • Washington State University
  • 22. Who can we learn from?
    • Creating Collaborative Catalogs Project
      • Zuni people of Southwestern United States
      • University of California, Los Angeles
      • Recalling Ancestral Voices
      • Sámi people of Sweden, Norway, Finland and Russia
  • 23. Key features Figurine ET.92.1 Musees Royaux d’art et d’histoire, Brussels
  • 24. Key features
    • Harvesting collection data from multiple institutions
    • Providing ways for community to contribute new information to enhance the resources
    • Providing ways to feed new information back to contributing institutions
  • 25. Challenges Cape de chef 71.1966.145.1 Musée du quai Branly , Paris
  • 26. Challenges
    • Amount of content available
    • The quality of existing documentation and images
    • Technical challenge to aggregate the content
    • How to encourage and facilitate community contributions
    • Where does this virtual collection sit within the NZ digital landscape?
  • 27. Next steps Fish-hook A.1923.371 © National Museums Scotland National Museums Scotland
  • 28. Next steps
    • Complete the scoping project (April 2012)
      • further discussions with interested communities
      • learning from existing projects in North America
      • defining our conceptual and high level technical approach
    • Begin a pilot project involving five or six museums in the UK, US and Australia
  • 29. Your feedback welcome Philip Edgar [email_address] Arapata Hakiwai [email_address] Paul Tapsell [email_address] Thanks!

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