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4401 math photography presentation lighting a path

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  • Multipication
  • addition
  • subtraction
  • Division

Transcript

  • 1. Math photograpy
    By: Ms. Nitra Coleman
  • 2. ??????????
    I’m thinking of a 4-digit number that has twice as many thousands as ones, twice as many ones as hundreds, and twice as many hundreds as tens. What is my number?
  • 3. Hint
    • Tens is the least place value digit.
  • Stars
    Ms. Coleman's astrology teacher asked her to practice locating stars through the telescope for 5 minutes the first night, 10 minutes the second night, 15 minutes the third night, 20 minutes the fourth night and she doesn't have to practice on Sundays. How many nights will it take Ms. Coleman to have 3 hours of practice?
  • 4. Hint
    • The minutes do not increase after the fourth night.
  • Wake up!!!
    Nia has to be to school by 8:30. It takes her 5 minutes to brush her teeth, 10 minutes to shower, 20 minutes to dry her hair, 10 minutes to eat breakfast and 25 minutes to walk to school. What time will she need to get up?
  • 5. Hint
    • Remember how many minutes there are in one hour.
  • Umm umm good
    Ms. Coleman used four thousand, nine hundred fifty-nine chips to make a big batch of giant chocolate chip cookies. Each cookie got about nineteen chips. How many cookies did Ms. Coleman make?
  • 6. Hint
    • Number is greater than 200 but less then 300
  • Answers
    I’m thinking of a 4-digit number that has twice as many thousands as ones, twice as many ones as hundreds, and twice as many hundreds as tens. What is my number? 8,214
    Ms. Coleman's astrology teacher asked her to practice locating stars through the telescope for 5 minutes the first night, 10 minutes the second night, 15 minutes the third night, 20 minutes the fourth night and she doesn't have to practice on Sundays. How many nights will it take Ms. Coleman to have 3 hours of practice? 15
    Nia has to be to school by 8:30. It takes her 5 minutes to brush her teeth, 10 minutes to shower, 20 minutes to dry her hair, 10 minutes to eat breakfast and 25 minutes to walk to school. What time will she need to get up? 7:20
    Ms. Coleman used four thousand, nine hundred fifty-nine chips to make a big batch of giant chocolate chip cookies. Each cookie got about nineteen chips. How many cookies did Ms. Coleman make? 261
  • 7. Assessment
    Write in your math journals for each problem, what made the problem easy? Or difficult?
  • 8. Standards
    M4N1. Students will further develop their understanding of how whole numbers
    and decimals are represented in the base-ten numeration system.
    a. Identify place value names and places from hundredths through one million.
    b. Equate a number’s word name, its standard form, and its expanded form.
    M4N2. Students will understand and apply the concept of rounding numbers.
    a. Round numbers to the nearest ten, hundred, or thousand.
    b. Describe situations in which rounding numbers would be appropriate and
    determine whether to round to the nearest ten, hundred, or thousand.
    c. Determine to which whole number or tenth a given decimal is closest using
    tools such as a number line, and/or charts.
    d. Round a decimal to the nearest whole number or tenth.
    e. Represent the results of computation as a rounded number when appropriate
    and estimate a sum or difference by rounding numbers.
    M4N3. Students will solve problems involving multiplication of 2-3 digit numbers by
    1 or 2 digit numbers.
    M4N4. Students will further develop their understanding of division of whole
    numbers and divide in problem solving situations without calculators.
    a. Know the division facts with understanding and fluency.
    b. Solve problems involving division by 1 or 2-digit numbers (including those
    that generate a remainder).
    c. Understand the relationship between dividend, divisor, quotient, and
    remainder.
    d. Understand and explain the effect on the quotient of multiplying or dividing
    both the divisor and dividend by the same number. (2050 ÷ 50 yields the
    same answer as 205 ÷ 5).
    M4N7. Students will explain and use properties of the four arithmetic operations to
    solve and check problems.
    a. Describe situations in which the four operations may be used and the
    relationships among them.
    b. Compute using the order of operations, including parentheses.
    c. Compute using the commutative, associative, and distributive properties.
    d. Use mental math and estimation strategies to compute.
    M4P1. Students will solve problems (using appropriate technology).
    a. Build new mathematical knowledge through problem solving.
    b. Solve problems that arise in mathematics and in other contexts.
    c. Apply and adapt a variety of appropriate strategies to solve problems.
    d. Monitor and reflect on the process of mathematical problem solving.
    M4P2. Students will reason and evaluate mathematical arguments.
    a. Recognize reasoning and proof as fundamental aspects of mathematics.
    b. Make and investigate mathematical conjectures.
    c. Develop and evaluate mathematical arguments and proofs.
    d. Select and use various types of reasoning and methods of proof.