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Uncover the Truth About Rigorous Teaching and Testing

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This session explores effective teacher’s rigorous teaching and testing practices. The presenter discusses the importance of professional learning communities, differentiation, multiple intelligences, …

This session explores effective teacher’s rigorous teaching and testing practices. The presenter discusses the importance of professional learning communities, differentiation, multiple intelligences, revised Bloom’s taxonomy, data driven instruction, performance based assessment, and formative assessment. The presenter provides practical solutions to educational leaders who want to improve the achievement level of all students.

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  • Click on either ELA or mathematics. On the next page, you can scroll through some examples. If you look at the top of this screen, you can choose grade specific sample items by clicking on "View More Math Sample Items.“ Preview text and pull out potential vocabulary words, particularly Tier 2 words
  • Create a Classroom Profile Who are my challenged, average, and gifted students? Low: Three crucial points, three concepts Direct Approach-Teacher explanation Middle: All aspects of the topic Modeling, Independent work, Review and Practice High : In-depth study Minimal instruction with probing questions for independent study
  • When using Storybird.com, students had to use the writing process and work backwards. The students had a rubric to guide them to the final product. I used my writing/reading standards to help mold this assignment. This website can be used in any grade level with the grade level’s standards. Students using stretch learning were able to
  • GOAL OF ITI MODEL: MASTERY ASSESSMENT: EE Ch. 23 What do you want students to understand? (patterns) using real life settings-BEING THERE What to you want them to do with what they understand? (programs) assess what’s worth assessing rather than what is easy to assess Mastery as in competence: not only in mastering skill or concept but he/she knows how to apply it in the real world Incorporated into a MENTAL PROGRAM Curriculum MUST BE authentic if assessment is to be authentic REAL WORLD TESTS OF MASTERY Ability to use language of discipline in social/complex situations Ability to perform appropriately in unanticipated social situations Ability to solve real world problems using skills and concepts Ability to show, teach, explain the idea or skill to another person who has a real need to know ROLE OF KEY POINTS State what’s worth learning and therefore what’s worth assessing Provide base for instructional planning Serve as communiqué to students, staff and parents about curriculum content Record what is being taught RUBRICS 3 C’s of Assessment EE p. 23.6-7 CORRECT: conforming to fact, free from error, accurate COMPLETE: having all parts/elements COMPREHENSIVE: of large scope, inclusive, extensive mental range or grasp
  • Along with the creating confidence by insuring success, teachers should create assessments that help students make connections to past concepts, understandings, and skills.
  • Although there is no universal definition of a PLC (Stoll et al., 2006; Williams, Brien, Sprague, & Sullivan, 2008), the following definitions offer a range of ways to describe a PLC: An ongoing process through which teachers and administrators work collaboratively to seek and share learning and to act on their learning, their goal being to enhance their effectiveness as professionals for students’ benefit (Hord, 1997) A school culture that recognizes and capitalizes on the collective strengths and talents of the staff (Protheroe, 2008). A strategy to increase student achievement by creating a collaborative school culture focused on learning (Feger & Arruda, 2008). Team members who regularly collaborate toward continued improvement in meeting learner needs through a shared curricular-focused vision (Reichstetter, 2006). A group of people sharing and critically interrogating their practice in an ongoing, reflective, collaborative, inclusive learning-oriented and growth-promoting way (McREL, 2003). Educators committed to working collaboratively in ongoing processes of collective inquiry and action research to achieve better results for the students they serve (DuFour, DuFour, Eaker, & Many, 2006). An inclusive group of people, motivated by a shared learning vision, who support and work with each other to inquire on their practice and together learn new and better approaches to enhance student learning (Stoll, Bolam, McMahon, Thomas, Wallace, Greenwood et al., 2005). While these definitions capture the spirit of PLCs, they are only a starting point for understanding them. What makes a PLC difficult to define is that it is not a prescription, a new program, a model, or an innovation to be implemented. Rather, a PLC is an infrastructure or a way of working together that results in continuous school improvement (Hord, 1997).
  • Transcript

    • 1. Uncover the Truth about rigorous teaching and testing practices Presented by Tesha Isler, Ed.D. Assisted by Amy Nichols Wayne County Public Schools Teaching and Learning Coaches/Human Resources Middle School Conference 1
    • 2. Agenda RigorousHow will you apply Teaching Practiceswhat you learned? Rigorous Testing Practices 2
    • 3. Uncover the Truth…• WHAT are we teaching?• HOW are we teaching it?• HOW do we know our students are learning it? 3
    • 4. What are we teaching?NCDPI Common Core and Essential Standards Wikispace:http://www.ncdpi.wikispaces.net/Sample Items and Performance Task:http://www.smarterbalanced.org/sample-items-and-performanceStanford University Resources:http://wordsift.com/site/aboutJoan Sedita site that focuses on Content Literacy:www.keystoliteracy.comHelpful Georgia site:https://www.georgiastandards.org/Common-Core/Pages/Math-K 4
    • 5. How are we teaching it?Dare to Differentiate Wikispace:http://daretodifferentiate.wikispaces.com/Cooperative Learning Role Cards:http://www.readwritethink.org/files/resources/lesson_imReciprocal Teaching:http://www.readingrockets.org/strategies/reciprocal_teaProblem Based Learning:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LMCZvGesRz8 5
    • 6. How do we know our students are learning it?West Virginia Department of Education:http://wvde.state.wv.us/teach21/ExamplesofFormWhy Formative Assessments Matter:http://www.edutopia.org/blog/formative- assessments-importance-of-rebecca-alberNew York Performance-Based Assessment:http://performanceassessment.org/images/p erformance/NYPBAS_chart.jpg 6
    • 7. Rigorous Teaching• Differentiation• Cooperative Learning• Engagement• Challenge & Critical Thinking 7
    • 8. D i ff er en tia tio n Co Lea op rni er a ng tiv e Enga geme nt Challenge and Critical Thinking Pro jec tB ase Re dL Teaching c ip ear nin ro g8 ca lT ea ch in g
    • 9. Differentiation• Data Driven Instruction 9
    • 10. Differentiation• Varied approaches to what students need to learn, how they will learn it, and/or how they can express what they have learned• Classroom Profiles Tomlinson, 2003, p.151 10
    • 11. How can I create a differentiated classroom?• Create a Classroom Profile• Who are my challenged, average, and gifted students? Low: Three crucial points, three concepts Direct Approach-Teacher explanation Middle: All aspects of the topic Modeling, Independent work, Review and Practice High: In-depth study Minimal instruction with probing questions for independent study 11
    • 12. Write a Poem Design a Poster or a Wordle Think of Song Titles Think of a list of words that Make a list of words that Make a list of song titles that have meaning for co-teachers. describe co-teaching. Create a could describe co-teaching. Write a short poem that uses poster or a wordle, laying these Write the list down. Be these words. words out in an attractive prepared to sing one of your pattern of positions and colors. songs for the group.Choice board for Make a Model Use simple household materials like toilet paper rolls, balloons, string, and pipe Create a Human Sculpture With your group members, create a human sculpture that depicts co-teaching. Create a Skit Create a skit that shows a co- teaching scenario.differentiated cleaners to make a model of what co-teaching looks like.projects Draw a Picture Make a Bumper Sticker Create a Collage Draw a picture that depicts co- Create a bumper sticker with a Think about words and images teaching. slogan that describes co- that the concept of co-teaching teaching. evokes in your mind. Find pictures and words in magazines and create a collage. 12
    • 13. Cooperative Learning• Learning Teams 13
    • 14. “You lead today by building teams and putting others first.” Jeff Immlet 14
    • 15. Engagement• Technology One-on-One• Multiple Intelligences 15
    • 16. Technology One-On-One Edmodo Group Code: urlul0http://www.symbaloo.com/mix/homewebmix2385 16
    • 17. Theory of Multiple Intelligence: 3 of the 8 intelligences Kin ry e sth t o e u di t ic A Visual 17
    • 18. Challenge and Critical Thinking • Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy • Problem-Based Learning Know Know and complex apply content complex content Know and Know apply content contenthttp://www.leadered.com/rrr.html 18
    • 19. BLOOM’S REVISED TAXONOMY Creating Generating new ideas, products, or ways of viewing things Designing, constructing, planning, producing, inventing. Evaluating Justifying a decision or course of action Checking, hypothesizing, critiquing, experimenting, judging Analyzing Breaking information into parts to explore understandings and relationships Comparing, organizing, deconstructing, interrogating, finding Applying Using information in another familiar situation Implementing, carrying out, using, executing Understanding (Based on Explaining ideas or conceptsPohl, 2000, Interpreting, summarizing, paraphrasing, classifying, explainingLearning to Remembering Think, Recalling informationThinking to 19 Recognizing, listing, describing, retrieving, naming, finding Learn)
    • 20. Problem-Based LearningRequires the use of real-world problems. Thisadds an exciting authenticity for students, but itcreates challenges for the teacher. Real-worldproblems, by their nature, are messy. It often isdifficult to predict how long it will take students todevelop a solution. These problems are basedon the existing curriculum, but they do not relyon traditional classroom resources such astextbooks and exams. 20
    • 21. 21
    • 22. Transforming Teaching From a Traditional Approach To a Transformed Approach“Deliver" Instruction “Facilitate” LearningTeacher centered Student centeredClassroom learning Learning anytime/anywhereStandardized approach Personalized, differentiatedLearn to do Do to learnContent focused Application focusedLooking for the right answer Develop thinkingTeaching segmented Integrating curriculumcurriculum Active learningPassive learning opportunitiesopportunities 22
    • 23. Rigorous Testing• Formative Assessments• Performance Based Assessments• Variety of Assessments 23
    • 24. D As iffe se ren ss tia ts m te Se en d lf A ss ss e me nts Asse s sm e Form nt ative Performance Base d Va Testing riet y of A As s se ssm in ses ent fo s rm m s s en24 in t t st ha ru t ct io n
    • 25. Formative Assessments“Formative assessment is a process used by teachers and students during instruction that provides feedback to adjust ongoing teaching and learning to improve students’ achievement of intended instructional outcomes” (Popham, 2008). 25
    • 26. Performance Based Assessments• Performance assessment is one alternative to traditional methods of testing student achievement. While traditional testing requires students to answer questions correctly (often on a multiple-choice test), performance assessment requires students to demonstrate knowledge and skills, including the process by which they solve problems. Performance assessments measure skills such as the ability to integrate knowledge across disciplines, contribute to the work of a group, and develop a plan of action when confronted with a new situation. Retrieved 26 from http://www.projectappleseed.org/assesment.html
    • 27. Alignment Between Content and Performance TasksWhat do you want students to know? What do you want students to do to show what they know? 27
    • 28. Variety of Assessments• Student products • Student Assessments Demonstrate Indicate a wide range, understanding by being reflect the learning, and able to use the learning in different contexts follow the rubric Indicate student use of a Provide feedback to variety of inquiry skills to both the teacher and the solve problems, create students on what is products, and access working and what is not information Donna Walker Tileston, 2011, 10 Best Teaching Practices 28
    • 29. Assessments The assessment should help students make connections to: UnderstandingsPast concepts Skills 29
    • 30. Rigorous RigorousTeaching Testing 100 100 200 200 300 300 400 400 500 500 600 600 30
    • 31. Rigorous Teaching - 100What is the main rigorous teaching practice?A. Differentiation B. Engagement C. Cooperative Learning D. QuestioningA. Differentiation 31
    • 32. Rigorous Teaching - 200What is the best way to differentiate according to my case study?A. Cooperative Learning B. Engage C. Classroom Profiles D. HumorC. Classroom Profile 32
    • 33. Rigorous Teaching - 300What is the highest level of Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy?A. Evaluating B. Creating C. Remembering D. ApplyingB. Creating 33
    • 34. Rigorous Teaching - 400What is considered a transformed approach to teaching?A.Facilitate learning B. Student CenteredC. Application focused D. All of the aboveD. All of the above 34
    • 35. Rigorous Teaching - 500Name three of the eight multiple intelligences (The intelligences that are critical touse daily)Auditory, Visual, Kinesthetic 35
    • 36. Rigorous Teaching - 600Name all the components of Rigorous TeachingDifferentiation, Cooperative Learning, Engagement, Challenge and CriticalThinking, Project Based Learning, and Reciprocal Teaching 36
    • 37. Rigorous Testing - 100What is the main rigorous testing practice?A.Variety of Assessment B. Performance Based assessmentC. Self Assessment D. Formative AssessmentD. Formative Assessment 37
    • 38. Rigorous Testing - 200How does the best become the best?A. Communicate often B. Work HardC. They never stop learning D. Laugh OftenC. Never stop learning 38
    • 39. Rigorous Testing - 300The assessment should help students make connections toA.Understanding, past concepts, skills B. Information, communityC. Performance based assessment D. Real life, information, skillsA. Understanding, Past Concepts, Skills 39
    • 40. Rigorous Testing - 400What is performance based assessment?Performance assessment is one alternative to traditional methods of testingstudent achievement. While traditional testing requires students to answerquestions correctly (often on a multiple-choice test), performance assessmentrequires students to demonstrate knowledge and skills, including the process bywhich they solve problems. Performance assessments measure skills such as theability to integrate knowledge across disciplines, contribute to the work of a group,and develop a plan of action when confronted with a new situation. 40
    • 41. Rigorous Testing - 500What is formative assessment? “Formative assessment is a process used by teachers and students during instruction that provides feedback to adjust ongoing teaching and learning to improve students’ achievement of intended instructional outcomes” (Popham, 2008). 41
    • 42. Rigorous Testing - 600How do you align content and performance tasks?You ask: What you want them to know? What do you want students to do to show whatthey know? 42
    • 43. How will you apply what you have learned?• Tell a partner how you will use these strategies in your classroom. 43
    • 44. Lifelong Learners• The best become the best because they never stop learning.“If we want to be serious about students’ learning,we need to be serious about our own learning. We need to continually seek and accept ideas, help, and criticism. Feedback works.” Alexis Wiggins in Education Week, Oct. 20, 2010 (Vol. 30, #8, p. 19) How do we know they are learning? 44 ASSESSMENT
    • 45. Professional Learning Communities• Professional Learning Communities (PLCs) shift the focus of school reform from restructuring to reculturing (Louis, 2006). A PLC is an ongoing process used to establish a schoolwide culture that develops teacher leadership explicitly focused on building and sustaining school improvement efforts (Bolam, McMahon, Stoll, Thomas, & Wallace, 2005; Huffman, 2000). Through participation in PLCs, teachers enhance their leadership capacity while they work as members of ongoing, high-performing, collaborative teams that focus on improving student learning (Rentfro, 2007). Retrieved from http://www.centerforcsri.org/plc/program.html 45
    • 46. Teaching1. Embrace rigorous expectations forall students.2. High expectations with challenge andexpecting students to problem solve andthink.3. Demonstrate expertise in use ofinstructional strategies, technology andbest practices.4. Facilitate rigorous and relevantinstruction based on how students learn.5. 46 Use assessments to guide and
    • 47. 47
    • 48. The 10 Best Teaching Strategies• Creating an Environment that facilitates learning• Differentiating for Different Learning Styles• Helping Students Make Connections from Prior Knowledge• Teaching for Long-Term Memory• Constructing Knowledge through Higher-level Thinking Processes• Fostering Collaborative Learning• Bridging the Gap between all learners• Evaluating Learning with authentic assessments• Encouraging In-Depth Understanding with Real-World Applications• Integrating Technology Seamlessly Into InstructionTileston, D.10 Best Teaching Practices “How Brain Research, Learning Styles, 48 and Standards Define Teaching Competencies” Corwin, 2011.
    • 49. Do NOT Give Up! 49 03/21/13 49
    • 50. Questions 50 03/21/13 50

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