Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Teacher Leaders: Leading Change in Difficult Times
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Teacher Leaders: Leading Change in Difficult Times

201
views

Published on

Teacher Leaders: Leading Change in Difficult Times …

Teacher Leaders: Leading Change in Difficult Times
What will schools look like 20 years from now? What role should teacher leaders play in this process? Come hear a national presenter discuss lessons learned from the nations’ most rapidly improving schools. This presentation looks at moving to CCSS using high levels of rigor for student learning and preparing classrooms for high student engagement.
Presenter: Bobby Ashley - Jefferson, NC

Published in: Education

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
201
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
12
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • Change is difficult however, teachers have dealt with change their entire career. Changes in standards, use of data, action research, addition of technology. Acknowledge that it can feel disruptive but it is inevitable. How we deal with the changes impacts our colleagues and students. He need to embrace it and be positive.
  • Books
    Time: Less than 1 minute
    Bookshelves full of books and weekly trips to the library are not as necessary as they once were. Products such as the Kindle and iBooks available on the iPad allow us to retrieve material either for research or pleasure almost instantaneously.
  • Navigation and Life Traffic Info
    Time: Less than 1 minute
    When is the last time you bought a map? Allow a few participants to respond. When is the last time you sat for a period of time in front of the television or radio to get a traffic update? Allow a few participants to respond. With Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) technology and live crowd-sourced traffic data available at the touch of a button on a smartphone, the way we get to where we are going has changed.
  • Engagement
    Time: Less than 1 minute
    Today’s kids will experience video games in a much different way than we experienced them as children. Gaming systems such as Xbox Kinect have kids putting down the button-filled controller connected to the system and instead using camera-based gestures and voice control to act out the game that they are playing.
  • Education
    Time: Less than 1 minute
    If the way we are learning is changing, then education also faces change. Technology has made information and entertainment more engaging, more accessible, and more customized. The result is a more global classroom. Students are not just learning in classrooms and through reading materials: they are learning from anyone, anywhere, anytime. It’s crucial that education follows this shift, as analyzing all the information received and making informed decisions is what the Common Core will ask of students.
  • The old classroom…what most teachers wanted…apples on the desk, happy birthdays on the board, all children sitting in their desks,…in rows, quietly, one boy with an eraser on his head…(BOY) girls with bows in their hair and dresses. Teacher in front of the classroom, direct instruction, pencil and paper days….do these room still exist in NC? We do unto others as it was done unto us.
  • Comparing Models
    Time: 2 minutes
    The three segments of the DSEI can be compared to traditional frameworks, which focus on teaching only. The following chart provides a comparison between traditional teaching frameworks and the DSEI. You will notice that the DSEI is focused on how the system (Organizational Leadership and Instructional Leadership) supports teaching, and that student achievement is not the sole responsibility of the teacher. This approach is used at many high-performing and rapidly improving schools. During the development of the DSEI, traditional frameworks were researched, synthesized, and compared. This research helped us to realize that student achievement requires more than a focus on teaching. It requires a focus on the entire system. On Participant Guide page 8, you will see the comparison chart.
  • Reflect on the last two questions, based on your answer on your index card
  • Educational Change is scary to everyone..change is scary to everyone. Some people will never change…like Joe and Jim..two hunters from down south….
    Think about the person who inspired you to do the work you do…why. Keep that person in mind as we go through the next few minutes.
  • Clarifying Understanding.
    This is not a “Comprehensive List”. Only provides a framework for understanding that RIGOR is about THINKING!
  • Our philosophy is tightly aligned to the expectations set by CCSS – where there are fewer, clearer and higher expectations. The R/R framework provides a common vocabulary for meeting these expectations.
    Have the participants get on the web site and explore for 5 min. Ask them to share one of their findings with an elbow partner.
  • The Next Generation of Assessments if aligned to the RR Framework. Students will be expected to know, think and apply their knowledge. The previous tests asked students to know. Our students need to be thinkers and we need to teach using the rigor/relevance framework.
    Have the participants get on the web site and explore for 5 min. Ask them to share one of their findings with an elbow partner.
  • Engaged and involved bullet can have the following story. They don’t like watching tv as much anymore because they are just a passive viewer they don’t have any in depth control over what is going on. Only option they have is to change the channel. 1 way interaction not 2 way like on YouTube or any other service where you can comment, recommend, share with friends.
    Additional story to show how kids today are different (Always on Always Connected). When power goes out Dad thinks to himself how great it will be peace and quite time for his family to bond and enjoy each others company. His kids are very anxious the minute the power goes out asking when it will be back on, what are they supposed to do with out being able to connect to anyone, cell phone battery isn’t going to last and don’t have service anyway. Before the dad has time to go and get a board game for the family to sit down and play he sees his two sons and a couple of their friends walking across the front yard towards the minivan with a handful of DVDs. They figured out that they could go into the minivan and watch DVDs using the minivan battery until the power came back on.
  • Technology
    The use of the Internet, smartphones, and other mobile and digital
    devices is growing exponentially. The world and certainly our students
    are increasingly wired. In 2011:
    • One third of the 7 billion people alive used the Internet.
    • Of the world’s Internet users, 45% were under the age of 25.
    • Developing countries increased their share of the world’s
    Internet users from 44% in 2006 to 62%.
    • With 5.9 billion mobile/cellular subscriptions, global penetration
    reached 87%; 79% in the developing world.
    • Of 1.8 billion households worldwide, 33% had Internet access,
    compared to 20% five years before.
    • In developing countries, 25% of homes had a computer and 20%
    had Internet access, compared to 20% and 13%, respectively,
    three years before.
    • Mobile broadband (wireless) subscriptions grew 45% annually
    from 2007 to 2010 and there were twice as many mobile
    broadband as fixed broadband (over the wire) subscriptions in
    2011. (www.itu.int)
    Our students are living and learning in a wireless, interconnected,
    “immediate” world—except when they are in school.
  • Schools are improving. We have never educated so many students, with such high standards…however…. (next slide)
  • …..the world is changing faster.
  • Recognize teachers: Tell the story of Dr. Alexander Erwin and how he only wanted ‘a teacher’ as his epitaph. It is the most important job in the world. Although I may say things that could appear offensive, it is because I care deeply about our educational system in America. We have the best educational system in the world: Teach all children, Universities take citizens from every country, etc.
  • Rigor and relevance have a deep and evolutionary purpose and presence
  • Image of pathways in your brain, what is relevant we have pathways for, as instructors we should tap into these
  • Share real photos of neurons - brain changes with each
    new experience, tap into neural networks
  • have them try to create a thought - making relationships
  • The relationships we have with our students in classroom are first and foremost in creating an effective learning environment. Creating a strong relationship between the coach and teachers is equally important – this is not an evaluation, I’m here to help make you job easier and to help students be successful.
  • Serotonin and dopamine are neurotransmitters that help us to regulate our mood and make us feel good, calm or happy. Notice the sprinkler system of these “feel good” neurotransmitters throughout the brain? Notice what area they dominate? The frontal cortex.
  • Refer back to Maslow’s hierarchy as well as their own understanding about how when they feel safe they are more likely to take risks, etc. The relationships we develop in classrooms literally assist the learning of our students.
  • Orient them again to what the colors mean and the functions of the different areas. The most important thing to point out is that the area of the frontal cortex is red, which means a high degree of activity is occurring in the frontal lobes during this emotion. The frontal cortex is where we write poems, create cathedrals and solve algebra problems. Again, ask them to note something about this slide.
  • Orient the audience to what they are viewing:
    An fMRI is a functioning magnetic resonance image. These indicate brain function while an event is occurring. This is done by taking many fMRI of many people and creating a composite, an average, so to speak.
    Now orient them to what the colors mean. Then have them examine the fear slide. Point out specifically what is occurring with regard to the frontal cortex in comparison with the brain stem and cerebellum (survival areas). Ask them to note something about the contents of this slide.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Teacher Leaders: Leading Change in Difficult Times Bobby Ashley, Educational Consultant bobbyashley2010@gmail.com
    • 2. Learning Targets: • Understanding the change process • Teacher Leadership – The Quadrants • Using common core state standards as a ‘driver’ for positive change • Making lessons relevant to the students’ world • Building positives relationships • Understanding and using neuroscience
    • 3. “If You Can Google it, You should not be teaching it” Do you agree or disagree? Why or Why Not? One minute to “turn and talk”
    • 4. “Whoever is doing the work is doing the learning” Do you agree or disagree? Why or Why Not? One minute to “turn and talk”
    • 5. 6 Examining Rigor
    • 6. 7 Examining Relevance
    • 7. 8 Examining Learner Engagement
    • 8. 9 Examining Literacy
    • 9. 10 Examining Literacy
    • 10. 11 Examining Literacy
    • 11. Change
    • 12. 3 2 1 1 – INCREMENTAL CHANGE -Improving Core Practices 2 – INNOVATIVE CHANGE -Fundamental Change of Core Practice 3 – TRANSFORMATIONAL CHANGE – Affect Entire System Change
    • 13. Shoes 1974
    • 14. 1994 Bag Phone—Car Phone
    • 15. …a few years later • New I phone 16
    • 16. 1950’s School Building
    • 17. 1970’s School Building
    • 18. 2000’s School Building
    • 19. 2010’s School Building
    • 20. Books
    • 21. Navigation and Live Traffic Info
    • 22. Engagement
    • 23. Education
    • 24. Does this classroom exist in your school?
    • 25. Or do your classrooms look like this • Collaboration
    • 26. Or this • Virtual Learning
    • 27. The Shift Traditional Teaching Frameworks 21st Century Teaching What teachers should do What the entire system should do Teacher-focused Student-focused Teachers deliver instruction Teachers facilitate learning Vision is set by top leaders Vision is built more inclusively Define vision primarily in terms of academic measures Define vision as strong academic and then personal skills and the ability to apply them Rigid structures support adult needs Flexible structures support student needs Focus on teaching Focus on learning
    • 28. “Whoever is doing the work is doing the learning”
    • 29. ® Rigor/Relevance Framework
    • 30. 31 Examining Rigor
    • 31. Essential Question: What is the role of the teacher in creating positive change?
    • 32. Rubric for Evaluating North Carolina Teachers Standard I: Teachers demonstrate leadership •Teachers lead in their learning environments •Teachers demonstrate leadership in the learning environment •Teachers lead the teaching profession •Teachers advocate for learning environments and learners •Teachers demonstrate high ethical standards
    • 33. 34 K N O W L E D G E A B DC Authoritative Leadership Four Quadrants of Leadership Collaborative Leadership Visionary Leadership Adaptive Leadership HighLow Low High APPLICATION
    • 34. AA BB DDCC Quad D Leadership FrameworkQuad D Leadership Framework High HighLow Low
    • 35. Quadrant A – Authoritative • Traditional Teaching • Manages the Classroom • Leaders decide – They act • Authoritarian – Keeper of Knowledge • Teachers is Working Hard
    • 36. Quadrant B – Collaborative • Knowledge is Shared Among All Stakeholders • The Classroom Works in a Highly Collaborative Setting • Group Work is the “Norm” • Students are Engaged with their Learning
    • 37. Quadrant C – Creative (Research and Best Practices) • Teacher and Students are Reflective and Innovative • Vision is Discussed • Anticipation of the Future • Student Needs Drive Action
    • 38. Quadrant D - Adaptive (Disposition) Reflective and Innovative Teacher and Students are Empowered to Take a Significant Leadership Roles Collaborative and Adaptive Solving Real World Problems
    • 39. Three Question Exercise • What will the world be like 20 years from now? • What skills will students need to be successful in that world? • What would learning look like if it was designed around your answers?
    • 40. Essential question: What is different in your school this year…as compared to last year?
    • 41. What can we do? How do we begin?
    • 42. Teacher leaders need to: • understand change process
    • 43. 3 2 1 1 – INCREMENTAL CHANGE -Improving Core Practices 2 – INNOVATIVE CHANGE -Fundamental Change of Core Practice 3 – TRANSFORMATIONAL CHANGE – Affect Entire System Change
    • 44. Teacher leaders need to: • understand change process • adopt rigor relevance framework • use common core state standards as a ‘driver’ for change • make lessons relevant to the students’ world • build positives relationships • understand and use neuroscience
    • 45. Rigor/Relevance FrameworkTM Knowledge Taxonomy Relevance Makes Rigor Happen! Application Model Evaluation 6 “Judge the Outcome” Synthesis 5 “Putting Together” Analysis 4 “Taking Apart” Application 3 “Making use of Knowledge” Comprehension 2 “Confirming” Knowledge 1 “Information Gathering” 1 Knowledge in ???? Discipline 2 Apply Knowledge in ???? Discipline 3 Apply Knowledge Across Disciplines 4 Apply Knowledge to Real World Predictable Situations 5 Apply Knowledge to Real World Unpredictable Situations Assimilation Students extend and refine their knowledge so they can use it automatically and routinely to analyze and solve problems and create solutions Student Thinks (Relationships Important) Acquisition Teacher Works (Relationship of little Importance) Students gather and store bits of knowledge and information and are expected to remember or understand this acquired knowledge. Application Student Works (Relationships Important) Students use acquired knowledge to solve problems, design solutions, and complete work. The highest level of application is to apply appropriate to new and unpredictable situations. Adaptation Student Thinks and Works (Relationships Critical) Students have the competence, that when confronted with perplexing unknowns they are able to use their extensive knowledge base and skills to create unique solutions and take action that further develops their skills and knowledge.
    • 46. Rigor is…  Scaffolding thinking  Planning for thinking  Assessing thinking about content  Recognizing the level of thinking students demonstrate  Managing the teaching/ learning level for the desired thinking level Rigor is not…  More or harder worksheets  The higher level book in reading  More work  More homework
    • 47. Performance Tasks •students must create, construct, or produce some product real world contexts •deep understanding and/or reasoning skills are needed and assessed •more than one standard/concept is assessed through the task •requires students to explain, justify AND defend •involves engaging ideas of importance and substance - real world contexts •typically, there is no single “correct” answer •very difficult to cheat on a performance task •emphasis is on what students will do, as opposed to what they recall •scoring criteria and standards are made public and transparent •learning occurs while students complete the task •feedback can be provided as task is completed
    • 48. ® Rigor/Relevance Framework
    • 49. 50 Examining Rigor
    • 50. The Flipped Classroom
    • 51. Teacher leaders need to: • understand change process • adopt rigor relevance framework • use common core state standards as a ‘driver’ for change • make lessons relevant to the students’ world • build positives relationships • understand and use neuroscience
    • 52. www.corestandards.org
    • 53. Next Generation of Assessments http://www.parcconline.org/parcc-assessment 54
    • 54. Teacher leaders need to: • understand change process • adopt rigor relevance framework • use common core state standards as a ‘driver’ for change • make lessons relevant to the students’ world • build positives relationships • understand and use neuroscience
    • 55. Kids Today Learn anywhere, anytime, with and from anyone Always on, always connected, expecting collaboration Need to be engaged and involved Demand personalized learning experiences
    • 56. Technology Connections “Our students are living and learning in a wireless, interconnected, “immediate” world—except when they are in school.” -Bill Daggett 58
    • 57. Schools are Improving School Improvement
    • 58. The World is Changing Faster School Improvement Changing World
    • 59. Findings Teachers are our greatest resources, our greatest hope.
    • 60. “It is not the strongest that survives, nor the most intelligent. It is the one that is the most adaptable to change.” - Charles Darwin
    • 61. Teacher leaders need to: • understand change process • adopt rigor relevance framework • use common core state standards as a ‘driver’ for change • make lessons relevant to the students’ world • build positives relationships • understand and use neuroscience
    • 62. relev ance = pathw ays
    • 63. The synapse is the place where chemicals (neurotransmitters) cross over from one brain cell to the next
    • 64. Relationships Make Learning Possible
    • 65. 70 serotonin & dopamine pathways
    • 66. Positive Relationships... increase feelings of safety, motivation and risk-taking
    • 67. 72 red and orange = high degree of activity purple and blue = low degree of activity
    • 68. 73 purple and blue = low degree of activity red and orange = high degree of activity
    • 69. B DC A R I GO R RELEVANCE Rigor/Relevance Framework High HighLow Low Relationships Relationships of Little Importance Relationships Essential Relationships Important Relationships Important
    • 70. ® Rigor/Relevance Framework
    • 71. Planning 76

    ×