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Supporting Text-Centered Instruction: Strategies for Reading Like a Detective
 

Supporting Text-Centered Instruction: Strategies for Reading Like a Detective

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Supporting Text-Centered Instruction: Strategies for Reading Like a Detective ...

Supporting Text-Centered Instruction: Strategies for Reading Like a Detective
40 Ways to Read Like a Detective is an interactive presentation on ways to facilitate text-centered instruction grounded in both informational and literary texts. Participants will explore multiple instructional approaches to engaging students in complex texts. This fast-paced, engaging session will offer a wide variety of Common-Core aligned lesson ideas.
Presenter: Anna Frost - NC Department of Public Instruction - Raleigh, NC

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  • Reading like a detective is about text-centered instruction, and the CCSS call for text-centered instruction, addressing the first of the three shifts in ELA.Complex texts worthy of rereading – close sustained readingRange and complexityReading closely to draw evidenceIncreasingly complex texts WITH increasing independence
  • Reading like a detective is about text-centered instruction, and the CCSS call for text-centered instruction, addressing the first of the three shifts in ELA.Complex texts worthy of rereading – close sustained readingRange and complexityReading closely to draw evidenceIncreasingly complex texts WITH increasing independence
  • It’s important that we define what text is. Often when you say “text”, people think of a textbook, novel or anything in print form; however, text is much more.
  • We are going to start with Text Impressions on Card 38. We adapted this strategy to use with a narrative text. It is called Story Impressions. Take a minute and read the instructional activity.
  • Then… Read Part one of Lady of Shallott
  • Go to Card 2… Collaborative Annotations. The use of this strategy deliberately increases student engagement. And, students engage in one rich text multiple times, building on the thoughts of others to gain a deeper understanding.It is wonderful that the CCSS gives teachers the autonomy to spend more time on small chunks of text instead of trying to cover a required book list like we have done in the past.
  • Here’s an example of collaborative annotations. This is a great formative assessment tool for the teacher. And it allows students who sometimes are nervous to speak out in class an opportunity to share their ideas in writing.
  • Referring to card 26, Sentence-Phrase-Word is also a great formative assessment tool. This is a strategy that has been adapted to become aligned to the CCSS.
  • So, referring back to the Lady of Shalott, specifically to the text highlighted in green… Take a moment and read this section and underline or highlight….A sentence that captures the central ideaA phrase that uses powerful languageA word the author uses that they found effective
  • Be sure that you choose content that is meaningful – consider what information will be revealed at each phase of the “reveal”.
  • Jot down your observations (what do you see)Then… what is your interpretation (inference or conclusion)
  • Jot down your observations (what do you see)Then… what is your interpretation (inference or conclusion)
  • Jot down your observations (what do you see)Then… what is your interpretation (inference or conclusion)
  • Jot down your observations (what do you see)Then… what is your interpretation (inference or conclusion)
  • Take a moment to share your observations with a partner.  Share out. Thoughts on the first image… 2nd image? Yes, Artists use various techniques to convey emotion.  3rd image? 4th image?
  • Now let’s take a look at the painting in its entirety. We are going to do a close reading of this text.What parallels and contrasts stand out to you? What new things do you see?  Does this change your hypothesis or interpretation? If so, how?  On an index card, what is Rockwell’s opinion of Lincoln. Make sure you provide evidence from the text to support your analysis. Keep in mind: Rockwell used angles to raise or lower the stature of his subjects. In a painting of a young Abraham Lincoln, Rockwell painted his subject from a low angle, making Lincoln seem bigger than life. He did the same when he painted the man sharing an unpopular opinion in “Freedom of Expression.” If he wanted to poke fun at someone, he painted them from above, as if to make them smaller and less important. This is a painting by Norman Rockwell called, Lincoln for the Defense. We are going to read a primary source document that explains the story behind this painting.  A big part of the obituary of the man who was on trial was of Lincoln’s performance during the trial.This is what Armstrong was most remembered for…Read and annotate, noting how the author makes commentary on Lincoln’s character. Could someone give us a quick summary of the trial?On an index card, jot down your observations and analysis based on evidence from the text. Small group discussion: Are there things that the writer can accomplish with words that the artist cannot accomplish with paints, and vice versa?  Read: Primary Source Letter. On an index card, jot down your observations and analysis based on evidence from the text. Read: Epitaph. On an index card, jot down your observations and analysis based on evidence from the text.  Return to the Line of Inquiry and have students write a short piece (approx. fifteen minutes) comparing and contrasting the ways in which authors and artists characterized Lincoln, paying special attention to HOW they accomplished what they set out to do. Be sure to emphasize the need to cite the texts.
  • Now let’s take a look at the painting in its entirety. We are going to do a close reading of this text.Reflect on what they had previously written about the individual elements and note any reassessments regarding their interpretations in light of the new information. Keep in mind: Rockwell used angles to raise or lower the stature of his subjects. In a painting of a young Abraham Lincoln, Rockwell painted his subject from a low angle, making Lincoln seem bigger than life. He did the same when he painted the man sharing an unpopular opinion in “Freedom of Expression.” If he wanted to poke fun at someone, he painted them from above, as if to make them smaller and less important. 
  • So now, let’s title the painting. Take a moment to create a title and share with a partner. (refer to the painting on slide 20)The goal isn’t necessarily to “get the right answer”; this strategy is more about creating a title and providing textual evidence to support it. Title:“Lincoln for the Defense”
  • Lincoln, prior to his presidency, defended a man in a murder trial.This is the almanac from the year of the murder that provided evidence towards his innocence. On Saturday, August 29th, 1857, the moon didn’t set that night. It set the next morning right at midnight.
  • You can download and print the cards from our ELA wiki and LiveBinder or you can purchase them through our DPI Publications Department using the information on the screen.
  • Kristi:

Supporting Text-Centered Instruction: Strategies for Reading Like a Detective Supporting Text-Centered Instruction: Strategies for Reading Like a Detective Presentation Transcript

  • Reading Like a Detective
  • 40 Ways to Read Like a Detective LiveBinder Resources: http://www.livebinders.com/play/play/297779 Click on the tab labeled, 40 Ways to Read  This will give you access to all the strategies
  • New ELA Resource: 40 Ways to Read Like a Detective: Supporting Text-Centered Instruction Text-centered instruction is a fundamental practice when teaching the English Language Arts Common Core State Standards. This resource is a practical tool exploring 40 ways to return students to the text to write, find evidence, read deeply, and become strong independent readers. Each research-based strategy is accompanied by a description, suggested instructional activity, and resources.
  • Text Impressions 1. Write a short story or poem using all the words listed. 2. Share your writing with a partner. 3. Read Part I silently and annotate as you read noting similarities and differences with your short story or poem.  Shalott  Camelot  Lady  All the land  song  echoes  four gray walls  reaper weary  Whispers  Fairy
  • Sentence-Phrase-Word  A sentence that captures the central idea  A phrase that uses powerful language  A word the author uses that they found effective
  • I Saw (Evidence: I saw / heard / read in the text…) I Thought (Interpretation: I infer / I conclude / I thought…)
  • Zoom In Thoughts?
  • 1. What new things do you see? 2. How does this change your hypothesis or interpretation? 3. Now, what are you wondering about that is not observable in the text or image? 4. What is Rockwell’s opinion of Lincoln. Provide evidence from the text to support your analysis.
  • How to Order Title: 40 Ways to Read Like a Detective: Supporting Text-Centered Instruction Item #: CM194 Cost: $8.00 To Order Contact NC DPI’s Publications Sales Office: 919-807-3470 1-800-663-1250 (inside NC only) Email publications@dpi.nc.gov.
  • List Serve http://elaccss.ncdpi.wikispaces.net/listjoin
  • ELA Resources LiveBinder Resources: http://www.livebinders.com/play/play/297779 LiveBinder Self-Study: http://www.livebinders.com/play/play/262077 Wiki: http://elaccss.ncdpi.wikispaces.net/home
  • Anna Lea Frost, M.Ed. 6-8 English Language Arts Consultant 919-807-3952 Anna.Frost@dpi.nc.gov Contact Information: