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Say Cheese! A Picture of Middle School Math Common Core
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Say Cheese! A Picture of Middle School Math Common Core

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  • 1. Say Cheese! A Picture of a Middle School Common Core ClassroomPresented by:Anna Crooke and Heather PuhlCaldwell County Schools
  • 2. • Identify what a Common Core Classroom looks like• Investigate lessons• Discuss and collaborate with others• Provide resources to support Common Core instructionGoals for Session
  • 3. • Look at the following pictures.• For each picture, write down any features you notice that exemplify what you think a common core classroom looks like.• After viewing the pictures, you will have the opportunity to share your thoughts with other participants.Snapshots of Classrooms
  • 4. • Kids without a teacher
  • 5. • Share timeWhat did you notice?
  • 6. What do you notice?
  • 7. What do you notice?
  • 8. • Kids without a teacher What do you notice?
  • 9. What do you notice?
  • 10. • Student directed• Concrete exploration• 3-Part lesson plan• Real-world relevancy Essential Components
  • 11. Teacher as facilitator • Not teacher-directed 100% of the time • Location in the classroom is not always at the front board • Teacher uses questioning to lead discussion • Process is more important than the end product Student Directed
  • 12. Management of the classroom • Teach students what is expected • Checklist to self-monitor behavior • Utilize individual, partner, and group- work Student Directed
  • 13. Differentiation • Accept multiple approaches and explanations • Students engage in math dialogue and appreciate individual contributions • Make math accessible for all students • Scaffold assignments • Use formative assessment to guide instruction Student Directed
  • 14. Content examples • Encourage multiple representations • Use manipulatives to build conceptual understanding • Tie conceptual understanding to abstract representation Concrete Exploration
  • 15. Resources/Strategies to Use: • Math Foundations Workshops • Math Investigations Curriculum • Integrated Math Curriculum • Superstars Math • AIMS Concrete Exploration
  • 16. You Do We Do I Do3-Part Lesson Plan
  • 17. • Explore Lessons with 6th, 7th, and, 8th grade teachers.Lessons For Learning
  • 18. Multiple Real-Life Applications of theContent • 6th – “Split Time”, 6.RP.3 • 7th – “Pizza Doubler”, 7.G.4 • 8th – “25 Billion Apps”, 8.F.4 Real-World Relevancy
  • 19. 1. What should his split time on the indoor track be? Write a guess.2. Write a number you know is too high and one that is too low. 6 th Grade, Act 1
  • 20. What information do you need? 6th Grade, Act 2
  • 21. 6th Grade, Act 3
  • 22. 1. If you’d like the most pizza, which coupon should you use? 7th Grade, Act 1
  • 23. 2. What information would be useful to know here?3. Can you prove your answer is correct?4. Would the best coupon for the slice above work for all slices or just slices? Tell me under what circumstances I should use one coupon or the other. 7th Grade, Act 2
  • 24. 1. When should you start bombarding the App Store with purchases to win?2. Write down an answer you know is too high and too low. 8 th Grade, Act 1
  • 25. 8 th Grade, Act 2
  • 26. 24,658,507,655
  • 27. 8 th Grade Act 2
  • 28. 4. What assumptions have you made in your model?5. Interpret the parameters in your linear model. What do the units represent? What does the y-intercept represent?6. According to your linear model, when did the app store sell its first app? Calculate an answer mathematically then find the actual answer. If those answers are different, what could explain the different? 8 th Grade, Act 3
  • 29. Discourse with Solving Problems • Justify answers • Pull real-world connectionsUse as a starting point rather than anending point. Real-World Relevancy
  • 30. • Questions?• Evaluation Conclusion
  • 31. Anna Crooke Instructional Facilitator Caldwell County Schools acrooke@caldwellschools.com Heather Puhl Mentor Caldwell County Schools hpuhl@caldwellschools.comContact Information
  • 32. • Dan Meyer, 3-Act Math Tasks, retrieved online October 2, 2012 from https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AjIqyKM 9d7ZYdEhtR3BJMmdBWnM2YWxWYVM1UWowTEE #gid=0 Resources