Building for Middle
Level Success:
Advisory &
Advocacy Programs
www.amle.org
As you come in, please take a
sticky note, wr...
Who is AMLE?
The Association for Middle Level Education
•Where you can find us:
– www.amle.org
•Who we are:
– The Associat...
Who is AMLE?
VIsit AMLE at
www.amle.org
Follow on Twitter:
@amle
DTomlin@amle.org
Follow on Twitter:
@DruTomlin_AML
E
AMLE...
How is advisory
part of
Curriculum,
Instruction &
Assessment?
How is
advisory part
of Leadership &
Organization?
How is
advisory part of
Culture &
Community?
What do we know?
5 Characteristics of the Young
Adolescents We Serve
1. Physical
2. Cognitive-Intellectual
3. Moral
4. Psy...
What are the threats to Advisory?
Lack of
focus for the
program
Lack of
professional
development
Organization & size
of ad...
1. Who teaches/coaches each advisory “class”?
2. How do we assign students?
3. What’s the curriculum going to be?
4. How d...
The Inquisitive Parent Scenario!
Why does every adolescent need
an adult to be his/her advocate
daily in school?
What does...
TEAM Time!
How did it all happen?
(1)Teachers in the building were thirsty for a better
“homeroom” concept. It was 20 min ...
TEAM Time!
(4) The counselor and the committee worked on the
curriculum for the advisory by linking it with a weekly
chara...
1. A committee of teachers and administrators decided that the current
advisory program needed to be changed. Was homeroom...
TEAM Time & WATTS Up?
1. Staff development should include video examples of what an
effective advisory looks, sounds like....
An Advocacy Program is…
Key Questions to Ask:
1.Why do you want to do it?
2.Who are you serving?
3.How will you identify t...
An Advocacy Program is…
•PATHWAY:
•Who? Recommended & identified discipline kiddos. Letter to parents
•When? During and af...
1. What does the school’s mission statement say regarding
advisory and advocacy?
2.What does the advisory program mission ...
AMLE’s 16 Characteristics of
an Effective Middle School from This We Believe
Questions, Comments, etc.?
Thanks for being a part of the
magnificent middle level!
www.amle.org
Dru Tomlin,
Director of M...
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Building for Middle Level Success: Advisory and Advocacy Programs

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How do we ensure that every student has an adult advocate who understands and guides his/her academic and social development? In this session, we will answer that question by examining how we build strong advisory and advocacy programs in our middle schools.

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  • Under Leadership and Organization, we also believe that middle level students and teachers need leaders who collaborate with teachers and who provide them with the most effective learning tools and professional development resources –like the ones we’ll learn about today.
  • And finally, for Culture and Community, we believe that the school environment should be inviting, safe, inclusive and supportive of all students. This occurs when we provide learning resources and tools that shine a spotlight on everyone’s contributions to our world. Doing this also helps to get families and community members involved as well. So without further ado, here to help us examine these outstanding resources for Women’s History Month are Darcy and Doreen from Britannica Digital Learning. And we’re going to start with Darcy!
  • Building for Middle Level Success: Advisory and Advocacy Programs

    1. 1. Building for Middle Level Success: Advisory & Advocacy Programs www.amle.org As you come in, please take a sticky note, write down what you want to learn from this session, & post it to the wall! Thanks! 
    2. 2. Who is AMLE? The Association for Middle Level Education •Where you can find us: – www.amle.org •Who we are: – The Association for Middle Level Education is the leading organization advancing the education of all students ages 10 to 15, helping them succeed as learners and make positive contributions to their communities and to the world. •What we do: – We provide vision, knowledge, and resources to over 30,000 middle level educators and leaders around the world. We help middle grade educators reach every student, grow professionally, and make great schools!
    3. 3. Who is AMLE? VIsit AMLE at www.amle.org Follow on Twitter: @amle DTomlin@amle.org Follow on Twitter: @DruTomlin_AML E AMLE2014 AMLE’s Annual Conference for Middle Grades Education November 6-8, 2014 in Nashville, TN!
    4. 4. How is advisory part of Curriculum, Instruction & Assessment?
    5. 5. How is advisory part of Leadership & Organization?
    6. 6. How is advisory part of Culture & Community?
    7. 7. What do we know? 5 Characteristics of the Young Adolescents We Serve 1. Physical 2. Cognitive-Intellectual 3. Moral 4. Psychological 5. Socio-Emotional How can advisory serve these student achievement areas? Snowball!
    8. 8. What are the threats to Advisory? Lack of focus for the program Lack of professional development Organization & size of advisory groups Lack of shared vision & norms Teachers’ discomfort with subjects raised by students Inadequate length of time for advisory Lack of district support Lack of coordination with families
    9. 9. 1. Who teaches/coaches each advisory “class”? 2. How do we assign students? 3. What’s the curriculum going to be? 4. How do we orient students & staff at the beginning of the year? 5. How do we prep families & community? 6. How will we evaluate the success of the program? Key Decisions for a Successful Advisory Program
    10. 10. The Inquisitive Parent Scenario! Why does every adolescent need an adult to be his/her advocate daily in school? What does that really provide? What’s advisory about anyway?
    11. 11. TEAM Time! How did it all happen? (1)Teachers in the building were thirsty for a better “homeroom” concept. It was 20 min at end of the day with low fidelity and high frustration; (2) A committee of teachers, counselors, and the principal met before the school year to discuss the vision, mission, and logistics of the advisory program –when in the day, days of the week, who would do it, number of students per group, curriculum for program, staff development; (3) A special meeting during pre-planning was had with all staff members about the advisory program. The principal led the meeting, took questions, etc.;
    12. 12. TEAM Time! (4) The counselor and the committee worked on the curriculum for the advisory by linking it with a weekly character ed program. How did it look? Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday S.O.A.R.= Success is Openness About Readiness Coach Approach! D.E.A.R.= Drop Everything And Read Coach Approach! ETC.= Eagles are Talking Collaboratively!
    13. 13. 1. A committee of teachers and administrators decided that the current advisory program needed to be changed. Was homeroom. 2. Film Clips resource was explored as a way to infuse character education and increase dialogue between staff & students. The committee decided that all staff members would have a WATTS Up group. Theme-based WATTS Up plans were created to help teachers & staff conduct conversations about film clips. 3. Master schedule was created so there was a compromise between instructional time and advisory. Decided to rotate WATTS Up and DEAR Time every Thursday for 25 min. in the afternoon. 4. Climate survey was given to students before & after WATTS Up to measure effectiveness. How did it happen? Websters Are Talking Together!
    14. 14. TEAM Time & WATTS Up? 1. Staff development should include video examples of what an effective advisory looks, sounds like. 2. You must monitor teacher/staff implementation. 3. When it’s not working for a certain teacher/staff, pair him/her up with an effective advisory teacher. 4. Maintain a committee of people to work on the curriculum for the program. 5. Get feedback from students and parents, too –but be careful what you do with it. 6. Need to have spaces for student concerns if you go with a curriculum (like Film Clips). What did we learn?
    15. 15. An Advocacy Program is… Key Questions to Ask: 1.Why do you want to do it? 2.Who are you serving? 3.How will you identify the students in the program? 4.How will inform parents of selected students? 5.Who is going work with the students? 6.How do you train your volunteers? 7.What activities will you have for students in the program? Who will monitor each one? 8.How will you involve community agencies? 9.When does it happen? –afterschool, during day, both?
    16. 16. An Advocacy Program is… •PATHWAY: •Who? Recommended & identified discipline kiddos. Letter to parents •When? During and after school. Sometimes with YMCA •Monthly events: 1 – 2- 3 •Basis: relationship only –no grades examined/discussed at length •CHECK & CONNECT • Who? Recommended & identified kiddos •When? During school •Quarterly check-in events (one week @ end of quarter; mentor selected the day w/ mentee) •Basis: relationship and skills
    17. 17. 1. What does the school’s mission statement say regarding advisory and advocacy? 2.What does the advisory program mission statement say? 3. What does “advocacy” mean? What are the parameters? 4. Who in the school will “manage and maintain” the advisory and advocacy programs? 5. How and when will the advisory and advocacy programs be evaluated? The following are some questions that may prove useful for purposes of discussion, implementation, clarification, direction, and evaluation…
    18. 18. AMLE’s 16 Characteristics of an Effective Middle School from This We Believe
    19. 19. Questions, Comments, etc.? Thanks for being a part of the magnificent middle level! www.amle.org Dru Tomlin, Director of Middle Level Services Dtomlin@amle.org

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