Mapping Internal Policy to the Hype Cycle
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Mapping Internal Policy to the Hype Cycle

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Mapping Internal Policy to the Hype Cycle Presentation Transcript

  • 1. MappingInternal Policyto Gartner’sHype Cycle nick charney cpsrenewal.ca
  • 2. The Hype Cycle The hype cycle is a graphic representation of the maturity, adoption and social application of specific technologies. The term was coined by Gartner, Inc. - Wikipedia by nick charney 2 http://cpsrenewal.ca
  • 3. Five Phases1. Technology TriggerProduct launch or other event that generates significant press and interest.2. Peak of Inflated ExpectationsA frenzy of publicity typically generates over-enthusiasm and unrealistic expectations. There may besome successful applications of a technology, but there are typically more failures.3. Trough of DisillusionmentTechnologies fail to meet expectations and quickly become unfashionable. Less attention is paid to thetopic and technology.4. Slope of Enlightenment:Despite lack of attention, some users remain and continue to experiment chasing the benefits andpractical application of the technology.5. Plateau of ProductivityBenefits become widely demonstrated and accepted. The technology becomes increasingly stable andevolves in second and third generations. by nick charney 3 http://cpsrenewal.ca
  • 4. The Policy Response to the Hype Cycle Legend Policy Lever If we map the policy response to the Hype Cycle we see that there are a number of points where the two intersect to create some interesting spaces. by nick charney 4 http://cpsrenewal.ca
  • 5. Mapping Internal Policy B 1 Legend 2 3 Policy Lever A Appropriation D 4 1 Vacuum B Max Risk Threshold 2 Recession C Turning Point 3 Resurgence C D Culture of Acceptable Use 4 Diminishing ReturnsA to the Hype Cycle by nick charney 5 http://cpsrenewal.ca
  • 6. Stage 1: Vacuum B 1 Legend 2 3 Policy Lever A Appropriation D 4 1 Vacuum B Max Risk Threshold C EAAs the visibility of employees appropriating new technologies for their own usesmounts, organizations perceive new and rising risks. Once visibility drives theorganization to its maximum risk threshold it triggers a policy response whichinitiates the next phase in the cycle. by nick charney 6 http://cpsrenewal.ca
  • 7. Stage 2: Recession B 1 Legend 2 3 Policy Lever A Appropriation D 4 1 Vacuum B Max Risk Threshold 2 Recession C Turning Point CAUsers pull back as the implications of the new policy are unclear. Education andoutreach become necessary on the part Policy owners in order to encourageand/or assure business lines that the policy is permissive not restrictive. Thishappens regardless of how permissive the policy may appear. by nick charney 7 http://cpsrenewal.ca
  • 8. Stage 3: Resurgence B 1 Legend 2 3 Policy Lever A Appropriation D 1 Vacuum B Max Risk Threshold 2 Recession C Turning Point 3 Resurgence C D Culture of Acceptable UseAClarification on the applicability of the policy via education and outreacheventually reaches a critical mass and usage resumes in a policy compliantmanner. by nick charney 8 http://cpsrenewal.ca
  • 9. Stage 4: Diminishing Returns B 1 Legend 2 3 Policy Lever A Appropriation D 4 1 Vacuum B Max Risk Threshold 2 Recession C Turning Point 3 Resurgence C E D Culture of Acceptable Use 4 Diminishing ReturnsABehaviours prescribed by the policy are sufficiently entrenched in the culturethat the policy starts to decline in value as the policy’s raison d’être is replacedby a normative culture acceptable behaviour within the medium. This does notoccur until the technology in question is universally accessible (e.g. email). by nick charney 9 http://cpsrenewal.ca
  • 10. Recap (1/3)A. Appropriation of New TechnologiesThe point where employees start to use new technologies in novel ways. These uses are bothunofficial and unsanctioned and while they may be innovative they carry a degree of risk thatscales along side usage.1. Policy Vacuum (Trigger to Peak)As the visibility of employees appropriating new technologies for their own uses mounts,organizations perceive new and rising risks. Once visibility drives the organization to itsmaximum risk threshold it triggers a policy response which initiates the next phase in the cycle.B. Maximum Risk ThresholdThe point where organizational concerns about the use of new technology need to be satiated byan overarching policy framework. This policy, regardless of orientation, will always have a chillingeffect on users because of lack of initial clarity, the introduction of new rules, and variances inopinion. by nick charney 10 http://cpsrenewal.ca
  • 11. Recap (2/3)2. Receding Use after Policy Comes to Force (Peak to Trough)Users pull back as the implications of the new policy are unclear. Education and outreachbecome necessary on the part Policy owners in order to encourage and/or assure business linesthat the policy is permissive not restrictive. This happens regardless of how permissive the policymay appear.C. Turning PointThe point where education and outreach around the new policy reaches critical mass (that is tosay the policy is sufficiently socialized) and business lines and employees feel comfortable re-engaging using these new technologies.3. Slow Resurgence of Use after Outreach and Education (Trough to Slope)Clarification on the applicability of the policy via education and outreach eventually reaches acritical mass and usage resumes in a policy compliant manner. by nick charney 11 http://cpsrenewal.ca
  • 12. Recap (3/3)D. Culture of Acceptable useThe point where there is a common understanding of how to use and not use the technology inquestion. By this point the technology is no longer new, in fact it is so diffuse as to be universallyaccessible to everyone in the organization (e.g. present day email).4. Diminishing Returns on Investment (Slope to Plateau)At this point the behaviours prescribed by the policy are sufficiently entrenched in the culturethat the policy itself starts to decline in operational value. In other words, the policy’s raisond’etre is replaced by normative culture of what constitutes acceptable behaviour with thatparticular technological medium. This does not occur until the technology in question isuniversally accessible (e.g. email). by nick charney 12 http://cpsrenewal.ca
  • 13. ImplicationsInternal policies are born out of a short shadow of the futureOrganizations issue a permanent policies to mitigate temporary risk; that is to say that policydecisions in this regard are front loaded and focus on the here and now rather than consideringthe logical end point of a completely diffused technology (e.g. culture of acceptable use).Policy shapes the emergent culture of acceptable useThat said, internal policies provide organizations an early opportunity to shape the emergingculture of acceptable use within the given medium. This allows them to minimize the immediaterisks but the return on investment declines significantly over time as use becomes ubiquitous(e.g. what would be the present day value of a policy to govern the use of a boardroom?)Organizational risk declines with widespread useMonitoring compliance in a world of widespread use is practically impossible, most internalpolicies are self-governing in that they simply penetrate the ethos of day to day operationsthrough osmosis and or are regulated socially by peers or through ad hoc inquiries. (e.g.whistleblowing) by nick charney 13 http://cpsrenewal.ca