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Chapter 10 power_point
Chapter 10 power_point
Chapter 10 power_point
Chapter 10 power_point
Chapter 10 power_point
Chapter 10 power_point
Chapter 10 power_point
Chapter 10 power_point
Chapter 10 power_point
Chapter 10 power_point
Chapter 10 power_point
Chapter 10 power_point
Chapter 10 power_point
Chapter 10 power_point
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Chapter 10 power_point

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Regional Cuisine

Regional Cuisine

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  • 1. Chapter 10 Global Cuisine 1: The Americas © Copyright 2011 by the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation (NRAEF) and published by Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • 2. Northeastern United States  New England is in the northeast corner of the United States along the Atlantic seaboard where fresh seafood is abundant.  New England cooking is characterized by simple recipes and extensive use of seafood, starches, and dairy products, including cheese and cream:  The New England boiled dinner is popular, and includes corned beef brisket, boiled potatoes, cabbage, and root vegetables like onions, carrots, or parsnips.  New England clam chowder is perhaps the most familiar version of a thick clam soup, creamy, white, and mild.  A bisque is made from the lobster shells, extracting all the color and flavor before straining the shells away.  New England is also known for its maple syrup. 10.1 Chapter 10 | Global Cuisine 1: The Americas 2
  • 3. Midwestern United States  The Midwest region of the United States consists of states in the center of the country. These states are known for their grassy plains, lakes and streams, and changes of season.  Midwestern cuisine has many cultural influences from people who immigrated from Germany, Britain, Italy, Hungary, and Scandinavia.  Foods in the Midwest are simple and hearty. Excellent dairy foods are produced in the Midwest, including fine cheddar cheese varieties.  Food from the central part of the continent is sometimes called “meat-and-potatoes” or “comfort food.”  Kansas City, Missouri, in particular is famous for its barbecue. 10.1 Chapter 10 | Global Cuisine 1: The Americas 3
  • 4. Southern United States  It’s easiest to divide Southern cuisine into the following categories:  Tidewater cuisine, which was influenced by the Native Americans who taught European settlers to plant corn and introduced them to native squashes, plums, berries, greens, game, and seafood, including fish and oysters.  Low Country cuisine, which was also influenced by the warmer climate and rice plantations combined with the busy port of Charleston, where pickles and relishes of the warmer climates became standard fare.  Creole cuisine, which is the blending of French grand cuisine principles with the cooking techniques of the enslaved Africans.  Cajun, which is a style of cooking from the swamps and bayous of southwestern Louisiana. 10.1 Chapter 10 | Global Cuisine 1: The Americas 4
  • 5. Southwestern United States  Much of the cuisine of the Southwest has been heavily influenced by Mexican culture, heritage, and cooking methods.  Beef and pork are commonly used meats. Offal meat is also used in Southwestern cuisine. Corn, beans, cactus, nuts, cumin, avocados, rice, citrus, and chili, ancho, and chipotle peppers are common ingredients.  Salsa is a signature dish of the Southwest. The word means sauce in Spanish.  Barbecue is also common in the region. Whole barbecued chicken, pulled pork, and ribs are popular dishes. 10.1 Chapter 10 | Global Cuisine 1: The Americas 5
  • 6. Pacific Rim/Coast  The food of this region is sometimes referred to as Asian fusion or Euro-Pacific. Awareness of this cuisine was created around the early 1970s when many eclectic styles of fusion cuisine became popular.  Seafood ingredients are used in abundance. Salmon, halibut, mussels, and oysters are all commonly used in dishes.  Pacific cuisine is not limited to Asian influences. San Francisco, for example, has a singular cuisine style that revolves around seafood and sourdough bread.  Continuing north to Oregon and Washington, increased rainfall and fertile soil create an area where trees, flowers, and berries grow plentifully. Pacific Northwest salmon, halibut, and crawfish are popular local items. 10.1 Chapter 10 | Global Cuisine 1: The Americas 6
  • 7. Mexico  Mexican cuisine is derived from the ancient Aztec and Mayan cultures.  Corn tortillas were originally cooked without fat on a comal, or a round, flat griddle made of stone or earthenware.  Chiles, or chili peppers, are a major flavoring agent of Mexican food in all regions.  Seafood, beef, pork, and chicken are very typical in modern Mexican food.  Mole means sauce or mixture. The most familiar is guacamole or “avocado mixture.” The most notable cooked variety is Mole Poblano, which is made with dried fruits and ancho chilis. 10.1 Chapter 10 | Global Cuisine 1: The Americas 7
  • 8. Section 10.1 Summary  New England is in the northeast corner of the United States and has access to a large supply of fresh seafood.  The Midwest consists of states in the center of the United States. Midwestern cuisine showcases simple, hearty dishes that make use of locally grown food.  The cuisine of Southern region can be discussed in three parts: the Tidewater region, the Low Country, and the Gulf Coast.  The cuisine of the Southwest has been heavily influenced by Mexican culture, heritage, and cooking methods.  Mexican cuisine is derived from ancient Aztec and Mayan cultures, which had very sophisticated food preparation. 10.1 Chapter 10 | Global Cuisine 1: The Americas 8
  • 9. Central American Cuisine  Tropical weather, beaches, and volcanic mountain terrain are hallmarks of Central America.  Bananas, pineapples, cacao (chocolate), organic dyes, and coffee beans have been the main exports.  The cuisine is an interesting transition point between classic Mexican food and the more varied foods of South America.  Curtido is a typical Central American relish that is made from cabbage, onions, and carrots in vinegar.  Gallo pinto is a mix of white rice and black beans, cooked separately and then fried together in coconut oil.  Corn tortillas and masa harina are staples in Central America as they are in Mexico. 10.2 Chapter 10 | Global Cuisine 1: The Americas 9
  • 10. Caribbean Cuisine  The cuisine of these islands nations is a combination of Caribbean-Euro-African influences.  In Jamaica, meat is seasoned with a spicy dry rub called jerk spice that preserves the meat and marinates in the flavors.  The beauty of tropical islands includes the abundance of fresh fruits and seafood.  African influence includes mashed starchy staples, such as mashed yams and yuca. Plantains, a type of starchy banana, is also mashed as a savory side dish in the Caribbean.  A ham-and-cheese sandwich becomes a cubano with the addition of roasted pork and pickles, and then grilled like a panini on pan cubano, or Cuban bread. 10.2 Chapter 10 | Global Cuisine 1: The Americas 10
  • 11. Section 10.2 Summary  Central American cuisine is an interesting transition point between classic Mexican food and the more varied array of foods in South America. It is influenced by Spanish and Caribbean dishes, without as much West African flavor.  Caribbean cooking has influenced the entire planet, because barbecue originated in this region. The technique of spicing meat and roasting it over a smoky wood fire may not have first and only happened here, but this is where it was first noticed and appreciated by the rest of the world. The beauty of tropical islands includes the abundance of fresh fruits and seafood. 10.2 Chapter 10 | Global Cuisine 1: The Americas 11
  • 12. Brazilian Cuisine  The Brazilian rainforest is called “the lungs of the planet” because of the enormous oxygen output of so much growth.  Portugal settled Brazil, and its cuisine includes tomato-based fish stews, which influenced the Brazilian Moqueca de Peixe.  Tropical fruits like bananas are a staple of the daily diet. Meat roasted on skewers over fire (churrasco) is a specialty. A bean stew called feijoada is a hallmark item in both Portugal and Brazil.  Beverages common to Brazil as well as Uruguay, are yerba matè tea and guarana.  In parts of Brazil, pinto beans will be daily fare; in other areas it will be black beans. Rice and beans are common, and meat is served even in poverty-stricken areas. 10.3 Chapter 10 | Global Cuisine 1: The Americas 12
  • 13. Peruvian Cuisine  Peruvian cuisine incorporates Asian influences, in addition to the Euro-African-American flavors found throughout South America.  The native populations developed sophisticated methods for coping with their extreme environment.  Cuisine in Peru fuses many South American flavors with Chinese concepts and haute cuisine techniques.  Ceviche is a citrus and fish mixture common to most of the Latin American coastal regions. It’s a signature dish in Peru.  Potatoes are many and varied in Peru. They come in more than 3,000 sizes, shapes, and colors! They are served in soups, salads, and meat dishes. 10.3 Chapter 10 | Global Cuisine 1: The Americas 13
  • 14. Section 10.3 Summary  Brazil was settled by Portugal as a colony, so the language and customs are Portuguese. Portugal introduced the western world to citrus fruits, which were brought to the New World and grown in Brazil. Portuguese cuisine includes tomatobased fish stews, which influenced the Brazilian Moqueca de Peixe.  Peru sits in northwestern South America on the Pacific coast and extends up into the rugged Andes mountains. The cuisine incorporates Chinese and Japanese influences in addition to the Euro-African-American flavors found throughout South America. Historically, the native populations developed sophisticated methods for coping with their extreme environment that are a marvel even now. 10.3 Chapter 10 | Global Cuisine 1: The Americas 14

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