Chapter 09 power_point

766 views
640 views

Published on

Sustainability

Published in: Technology, Business
0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
766
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
4
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
35
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Chapter 09 power_point

  1. 1. Chapter 9 Sustainability in the Restaurant and Foodservice Industry © Copyright 2011 by the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation (NRAEF) and published by Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.
  2. 2. History of Sustainability  Although the term “going green” has become popular recently, the concept of protecting and preserving the environment has been around in the United States for a long time.  In 1864, the U.S. Congress began creating national parks.  The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was founded in 1970 and charged with protecting human health and the environment:  Sustainability refers to the practices that meet current resource needs without compromising the ability to meet future needs.  Conservation is the practice of limiting the use of a resource.  Restaurant and foodservice operations rely on many natural resources, such as natural gas, wind power, nuclear energy, hydroelectric power, and/or solar power. Other natural resources, such as paper and steel, are essential to basic hospitality operations. 9.1 Chapter 9 | Sustainability in the Restaurant and Foodservice Industry 2
  3. 3. The Need for Water Conservation  Surface water includes all of the water that is on top of the earth’s surface.  Groundwater is found beneath the earth’s surface.  Almost 75 percent of the earth’s surface is covered with water, but only 1 percent of that can be used by humans.  The United States uses more than 345,000 million gallons of fresh water every day. On average, Americans and Canadians use more than 100 gallons of water a day per person just for personal use.  Water conservation is a critical principle of sustainability. Restaurant and foodservice operations have a responsibility to use as little water as needed to run their businesses. 9.1 Chapter 9 | Sustainability in the Restaurant and Foodservice Industry 3
  4. 4. What This Industry Can Do To conserve, restaurant and foodservice operations can: Restaurant and foodservice operations can install equipment:  Thaw food in the cooler  Soak and scrape first  Keep water temperatures at the right level  Load dishwashers correctly  Repair leaks quickly  Don’t automatically serve water  Sweep the outside areas  Train employees to conserve  Low-flow spray valves  Low-flow toilets and waterless urinals  Sink aerators  Energy-efficient dishwashers  On-demand water heaters  Connectionless steamers 9.1 Chapter 9 | Sustainability in the Restaurant and Foodservice Industry 4
  5. 5. Section 9.1 Summary  Sustainability refers to all the practices that meet current resource needs without compromising the ability to meet future needs.  Conservation is the practice of limiting the use of a resource.  Water conservation is important because droughts reduce water levels and many parts of the world are already experiencing water shortages.  There are many actions restaurant and foodservice operations cake take to use water efficiently. 9.1 Chapter 9 | Sustainability in the Restaurant and Foodservice Industry 5
  6. 6. The Importance of Energy Efficiency  Much of what is used to power cities, homes, and businesses comes from nonrenewable energy sources, such as fossil fuels.  Renewable energy sources do not rely on a finite supply of a resource, directly emit greenhouse gases, or contribute to air pollution.  The most common examples of renewable energy are:  Water (hydropower)  Wind  Geothermal  Solar  Biomass  Owners and operators can reduce energy usage in a restaurant or foodservice operation through conservation and efficient use. 9.2 Chapter 9 | Sustainability in the Restaurant and Foodservice Industry 6
  7. 7. What This Industry Can Do Every operation should have an energy efficiency plan based on its usage needs.  Turn off lights when not in use  Make sure loads are full  Power down idle equipment  Seal off unused areas  Reduce idle times  Clean and maintain equipment regularly 9.2  Replace incandescent lighting  Purchase energy-efficient equipment  Heat water in smarter ways Chapter 9 | Sustainability in the Restaurant and Foodservice Industry 7
  8. 8. Building for Efficiency  Commercial buildings consume 36 percent of all energy and 64 percent of all electricity used in the United States.  Green buildings are designed, built, renovated, or reused so that the structure conserves energy, uses resources more efficiently, and reduces the overall impact on the environment.  Building owners often can find financing to fund or offset energysaving efforts.  Designing and constructing a new building from scratch provides the best chance to an operation efficient and environmentally friendly.  For restaurant and foodservice operations in an existing building, renovations are an opportunity to improve energy efficiency and reduce costs. 9.2 Chapter 9 | Sustainability in the Restaurant and Foodservice Industry 8
  9. 9. Section 9.2 Summary  Renewable energy sources do not rely on a finite supplies, directly emit greenhouse gases, or contribute to air pollution.  Restaurant and foodservice operations can become energy efficient by:          9.2 Turning off lights Fully loading dishwashers, washing machines, and ovens Powering down idle equipment Sealing off unused areas Reducing idle time Cleaning and maintaining equipment regularly Replacing incandescent lighting Purchasing energy-efficient equipment Heating water in smart ways Chapter 9 | Sustainability in the Restaurant and Foodservice Industry 9
  10. 10. Reusing  One way to manage waste is to reuse or repurpose items that employees would otherwise throw away.  Repurposed food is food that customers did not eat, but that staff prepared, cooked, cooled, and held safely.  Management can reuse food in three ways: 1. 2. 3. Serve the food in its original format. Repurpose the food into another format. Donate food to local food-rescue programs.  Restaurant and foodservice operations may include reused materials in their facility design and customer offerings.  Worn but usable items are often accepted by charity organizations and homeless centers. 9.3 Chapter 9 | Sustainability in the Restaurant and Foodservice Industry 10
  11. 11. Reducing  A restaurant or foodservice operation practices waste reduction by taking steps to limit the amount of garbage it makes.  Reducing is both a benefit to the environment and to the bottom line: Less waste means the operation is making better choices about food production and storage.  The key to reducing waste is smart planning, which leads to less wasted food.  For products with a longer shelf life, buyers can make bulk purchases as storage space allows, which helps to reduce the number of containers in use. 9.3 Chapter 9 | Sustainability in the Restaurant and Foodservice Industry 11
  12. 12. Recycling Recycling transforms waste into valuable resources. Examples of easily recycled items include:  Newspapers  Paper bags and carry-out drink trays  Office paper  Corrugated cardboard  Metal food containers  Aluminum cans and foil wrap  Milk cartons/jugs 9.3  Juice cartons  Glass bottles and jars  Plastic bottles, cutlery, straws, and butter containers  Film plastics, plastic wrap, plastic shopping bags  All beverage containers  Bottle caps Chapter 9 | Sustainability in the Restaurant and Foodservice Industry 12
  13. 13. Getting Started Before beginning to recycle, take the following steps: 1. Audit the trash 2. Select a recycling manager 3. Set up bins and containers for recyclables 4. Identify your recycler 5. Decide whether to separate or use a single stream 9.3 6. Join a co-op or align with neighbors 7. Create a recycle environment 8. Promote recycling efforts Chapter 9 | Sustainability in the Restaurant and Foodservice Industry 13
  14. 14. Composting  Do not dump or wash down inedible food scraps into garbage disposals—instead, compost them.  Composting is a natural form of recycling that occurs when organic material decomposes (or composts) to form organic fertilizer.  Compost is created by putting organic wastes in proper ratios and then into piles, rows, or vessels and adding bulking agents to accelerate the breakdown of organic materials.  Composting is also a process that can transform wasted food into an environmentally useful commodity.  Setting up a composting plan is the smartest way to ensure that a restaurant or foodservice operation will handle this process effectively. 9.3 Chapter 9 | Sustainability in the Restaurant and Foodservice Industry 14
  15. 15. Section 9.3 Summary  Operations can reduce total waste by reducing, reusing, and recycling.  Restaurant and foodservice operations can recycle empty plastic bottles and containers, cardboard boxes, old newspapers, paper bags, Styrofoam, paper bags, and plastic cutlery.  Restaurant and foodservice operations can reuse repurposed food that was not eaten by customers but was prepared, cooked, cooled, and held safely.  Restaurant and foodservice operations can reduce by limiting the garbage they make. 9.3 Chapter 9 | Sustainability in the Restaurant and Foodservice Industry 15
  16. 16. Local Sourcing A local source offers food produced in the surrounding growing region.  Local sourcing is a way to reduce the amount of travel that some food products must make.  A restaurant or foodservice operation that wants to buy food from local sources needs to be prepared and focused on specific goals: 1. 2. 3. 4. 9.4 Start small and look for logical opportunities Research and network Stay flexible Promote local efforts Chapter 9 | Sustainability in the Restaurant and Foodservice Industry 16
  17. 17. Sustainable Seafood  Americans spend more than 7 percent of their food dollars or almost $70 billion a year on seafood.  Restaurants account for two-thirds of all seafood revenue in the United States.  The Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) reports that 75 percent of the world’s fish species have been fully fished, overfished, or depleted within the last 15 years. 9.4 Chapter 9 | Sustainability in the Restaurant and Foodservice Industry 17
  18. 18. Aquaculture Aquaculture is the production of seafood under controlled conditions. It accounts for 50 percent of the fish consumed globally.  Aquaculture has grown to an industry that produces more than 45 million tons of seafood every year, including 800 million pounds from the United States.  Talking with a reputable supplier about its seafood sourcing policies and species diversity is the best process for understanding sustainable seafood options.  Fisheries with well-managed, healthy populations are a good source of sustainable seafood for restaurants and foodservice operations because purchasers are able to order the seafood consistently according to menu needs. 9.4 Chapter 9 | Sustainability in the Restaurant and Foodservice Industry 18
  19. 19. Coffee  Americans buy and drink more coffee than any other country in the world.  Conservationists and scientists have begun studying the environmental effects of various coffee-production methods:  Sun coffee farms require strict management and frequent fertilizer and pesticide intervention to maintain healthy crops.  With the shade-grown coffee method, coffee trees grow under taller rainforest trees, whose larger leaves shade the crop.  Environmentalists have focused on shade-grown coffee as an attractive way to preserve biodiversity in tropical rainforests.  Restaurant and foodservice operations must consider the costs of the coffee that they plan to offer. Shade-grown coffee is typically more expensive than sun coffee. 9.4 Chapter 9 | Sustainability in the Restaurant and Foodservice Industry 19
  20. 20. Animal Products  The demand for animal food products has sharply increased along with general global food demand over the last few decades.  Critics have targeted industrialized farming for its possible effects on the environment.   Some restaurant and foodservice operations look for ways to procure animal products that are produced with more environmentally friendly and humane practices.  Restaurant and foodservice operations seeking out sustainably produced animal products must do some research and talk to their suppliers. 9.4 Chapter 9 | Sustainability in the Restaurant and Foodservice Industry 20
  21. 21. Organic Food Organic food is produced without pesticides or synthetic fertilizers.  Organic farmers usually conserve soil and water and don’t treat animals with antibiotics or growth hormones.  The designation of “organic” is regulated by the USDA through the National Organic Program.  In 2008, the market for organic food in the United States was nearly $25 billion.  Price is a concern when considering organic products. An organic item can cost anywhere from 10 to 40 percent higher than its conventional counterpart.  Recent studies show that some customers are willing to pay a higher price for organic food. 9.4 Chapter 9 | Sustainability in the Restaurant and Foodservice Industry 21
  22. 22. The Emerging Landscape  The movement toward sustainable food practices and conservation as a whole continues to grow and change at a rapid pace.  Each year, the number of independent certifications and government-created standards increases, serving to create better communication with the public.  Managers and owners must analyze their choices carefully, keeping both the present and the future of their businesses in mind.  Restaurant owners, farmers, processors, suppliers, and manufacturers are all working to develop smarter technology, more environmentally friendly practices, and sustainable, profitable operations. 9.4 Chapter 9 | Sustainability in the Restaurant and Foodservice Industry 22
  23. 23. Section 9.4 Summary  A local source offers food produced by the surrounding region.  The FAO reports that 75 percent of the world’s fish species have been fully fished, overfished, or depleted within the last 15 years.  For those operations that plan to feature sustainable food products on their menus, coffee is a simple place to start.  Restaurant and foodservice operations seeking out sustainably produced animal products must do some research and talk to their suppliers.  Organic food is produced without pesticides or synthetic fertilizers.  Restaurant owners, farmers, processors, suppliers, and manufacturers are all working to develop smarter technology, more environmentally-friendly practices, and sustainable, profitable operations. 9.4 Chapter 9 | Sustainability in the Restaurant and Foodservice Industry 23

×