FOUNDATIONS
of Restaurant Management
& Culinary Arts
Level Two
Activity Guide—Teacher’s Edition

National Restaurant Assoc...
Editorial Director: Vernon Anthony
Executive Editor: Wendy Craven
Editorial Assistant: Lenore Chait
Director of Marketing:...
Table of Contents

Table of Contents
Chapter 1	

Breakfast Food and Sandwiches  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  ...
Table of Contents

Chapter 4	

Salads and Garnishing  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . ...
Table of Contents

Chapter 7	

Marketing  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . ...
Table of Contents

Chapter 10	 Global Cuisine 1—The Americas  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  ...
Table of Contents

Welcome
This Activity Guide—Teacher’s Edition provides teachers with instructions for setting up each o...
Welcome

Recommended Kitchen Equipment
Appliances

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Open-burner gas stovetop
Broiler
Grill
Dishwasher
Work tables or co...
Welcome

Utensils and other equipment
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Welcome

Preparing for a Kitchen Lab Activity
	 1. Select the appropriate recipe(s) in advance.
	 2. Review ingredient and...
Welcome

Evaluating and Scoring Student Performance on
Kitchen Lab Activities
A recommended evaluation/scoring rubric is p...
Welcome

Bonus Points
At the teacher’s discretion, bonus points should be considered and awarded to students who go above ...
Welcome

xiii
Chapter 1 | Breakfast Food and Sandwiches

Chapter 1
Activity 1.1
Test Your Breakfast Food and Sandwiches IQ
Instructor Se...
Chapter 1 | Breakfast Food and Sandwiches

T _ 7.
F _ 8.
Hot beverages such as coffee do not maintain their flavor well an...
Chapter 1 | Breakfast Food and Sandwiches

Activity 1.2
Crossword Puzzle—Dairy Products and Eggs
Instructor Setup
Have stu...
Chapter 1 | Breakfast Food and Sandwiches

Activity 1.3
Lab—Make Your Own Cheese
Instructor Setup
Review the key elements ...
Chapter 1 | Breakfast Food and Sandwiches

Specialty Eggs
	 1. Organic eggs must meet specific government standards. They ...
Chapter 1 | Breakfast Food and Sandwiches

	 5. What would you do differently if you were going to prepare this recipe aga...
Chapter 1 | Breakfast Food and Sandwiches

Activity 1.8
Lab—Sandwiches
Instructor Setup
Review and follow the instructions...
Chapter 1 | Breakfast Food and Sandwiches

Activity 1.10
Design a Sandwich Shop
Instructor Setup
Lead students in a discus...
Chapter 2 | Nutrition

Chapter 2
Activity 2.1
Test Your Knowledge of Nutrition IQ
Instructor Setup
Before beginning Chapte...
Chapter 2 | Nutrition

F _ 3.
Eating raw foods, especially fruits and vegetables, can provide nutritious options, but some...
Chapter 2 | Nutrition

Activity 2.2
Crossword Puzzle—The ABCs of Nutrition
Instructor Setup
Have students review the mater...
Chapter 2 | Nutrition

Present the class with a collection of nutrition labels for review and comparison, and ask students...
Chapter 2 | Nutrition

Instructor Debrief
Ask the students to share elements from their menus with the class, and then lea...
Chapter 2 | Nutrition

Optional Activity
Divide the class in half. Assign half of the class the task of designing ads abou...
Chapter 2 | Nutrition

Activity 2.8
Lab—Heart-Healthy Cooking
Instructor Setup
Review and follow instructions found in the...
Chapter 2 | Nutrition

Activity 2.10
Presentation—Should GMOs Be Regulated?
Instructor Setup
Review the section on genetic...
Chapter 3 | Cost Control

Chapter 3
Activity 3.1
Test Your Knowledge of Cost Control IQ
Instructor Setup
Before beginning ...
Chapter 3 | Cost Control

Part 3—Controlling Labor Costs
T _ 1.
F _ 2.
Several factors play a role in labor costs, includi...
Chapter 3 | Cost Control

Activity 3.2
Crossword Puzzle—Cost Control
Instructor Setup
Have students review the material in...
Chapter 3 | Cost Control

Activity 3.3
Profit-and-Loss Statement Information
Instructor Setup
Have students complete the e...
Chapter 3 | Cost Control

Activity 3.4
Costing and Pricing—Gazpacho
Instructor Setup
Ask students to complete the workshee...
Chapter 3 | Cost Control

Gazpacho
Yield: 120 servings 		
Ingredient
Tomatoes
Cucumbers
Onions
Green bell peppers
Crushed ...
Chapter 3 | Cost Control

		 Students should use the formula:
		 Item cost ÷ Food cost percentage = Selling price
		 This ...
Chapter 3 | Cost Control

Instructor Debrief
After the students have completed the yield test, lead them in a discussion a...
Chapter 3 | Cost Control

Activity 3.8
Case Study—Standard Portion Costs
Instructor Setup
Ask students to read the informa...
Chapter 3 | Cost Control

	 3. $5.00
$1.67  2 = $3.34;
$3.34 + $1.67 = $5.01, rounded to $5.00
	 4. $4.50
$1.67 + $2.82 =...
Chapter 4 | Salads and Garnishing

Chapter 4
Activity 4.1
Test Your Knowledge of Salads and Garnishing IQ
Instructor Setup...
Chapter 4 | Salads and Garnishing

Part 3—Garnishes
T _ 1.
F _ 2.
A garnish is an essential part of the dish and should be...
Chapter 4 | Salads and Garnishing

Activity 4.2
Crossword Puzzle—Salad Time
Instructor Setup
Have students review the mate...
Chapter 4 | Salads and Garnishing

Activity 4.3
Lab—Lunch and Dinner Salads
Instructor Setup
Review and follow instruction...
Chapter 4 | Salads and Garnishing

Optional Activity 1
After students have completed the Webquest, ask them to find an add...
Chapter 4 | Salads and Garnishing

Instructor Debrief
After the students have completed the lab, lead them in a discussion...
Chapter 4 | Salads and Garnishing

Activity 4.8
Lab—Advanced Garnishes
Instructor Setup
Review and follow instructions fou...
Chapter 4 | Salads and Garnishing

Supplies Required
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Block of semisweet chocolate

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Grater or microplane

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Parin...
Chapter 5 | Purchasing and Inventory

Chapter 5
Activity 5.1
Test Your Knowledge of Purchasing
and Inventory IQ
Instructor...
Chapter 5 | Purchasing and Inventory

Part 3—Managing Purchases
F _ 1.

The receiving process includes three critical elem...
Chapter 5 | Purchasing and Inventory

Activity 5.2
Crossword Puzzle—Purchasing
Instructor Setup
Have students review the m...
Chapter 5 | Purchasing and Inventory

Instructor Debrief
After the students have completed the research and submitted thei...
Chapter 5 | Purchasing and Inventory

Instructor Debrief
After students have completed their product specifications, lead ...
Chapter 5 | Purchasing and Inventory

Additional Activity
Create a spreadsheet using Excel or a similar program, and have ...
Chapter 5 | Purchasing and Inventory

	 2. The two most common methods are physical inventory (sometimes called periodic i...
Chapter 5 | Purchasing and Inventory

Instructor Debrief
After the students have shared their posters, lead them in a disc...
Chapter 5 | Purchasing and Inventory

Activity 5.10
Receiving Guidelines
Instructor Setup
Review the section on receiving ...
Chapter 6 | Meat, Poultry, and Seafood

Chapter 6
Activity 6.1
Test Your Meat, Poultry, and Seafood IQ
Instructor Setup
Be...
Chapter 6 | Meat, Poultry, and Seafood

Part 3—Seafood
T _ 1.
F _ 2.
The two main categories of fish are fin fish (any fis...
Chapter 6 | Meat, Poultry, and Seafood

and lead the class in a discussion about persuasive writing. Then, ask the student...
Chapter 6 | Meat, Poultry, and Seafood

Activity 6.4
Match the Cut to the Best Cooking Technique
Instructor Setup
Review t...
Chapter 6 | Meat, Poultry, and Seafood

Additional Activity
After the students have completed breaking down the chicken, i...
Chapter 6 | Meat, Poultry, and Seafood

■■

Types of sushi and sashimi:
www.thenibble.com/reviews/main/fish/seafood/sushi-...
Chapter 6 | Meat, Poultry, and Seafood

Activity 6.9
Presentation—Sustainable Seafood
Instructor Setup
Begin the discussio...
Chapter 7 | Marketing

Chapter 7
Activity 7.1
Test Your Knowledge of Marketing IQ
Instructor Setup
Before beginning the ch...
Chapter 7 | Marketing

T _ 4.
T _ 5.
F _ 6.
Items designated as “plow horse” are popular but may not be profitable, so rem...
Chapter 7 | Marketing

Activity 7.2
Crossword Puzzle—Marketing
Instructor Setup
Have students review the material in Chapt...
Chapter 7 | Marketing

Begin by asking students about the difference between advertising and marketing. Have them brainsto...
Chapter 7 | Marketing

Instructor Debrief
Have students share their promotional materials with the class, and have them ex...
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Activity book teachers_edition_l2

  1. 1. FOUNDATIONS of Restaurant Management & Culinary Arts Level Two Activity Guide—Teacher’s Edition National Restaurant Association Boston  Columbus  Indianapolis  New York  San Francisco Upper Saddle River Amsterdam   Cape Town  Dubai  London  Madrid  Milan Munich  Paris  Montreal  Toronto Delhi  Mexico City  Sao Paulo  Sydney  Hong Kong  Seoul  Singapore  Taipei  Tokyo  
  2. 2. Editorial Director: Vernon Anthony Executive Editor: Wendy Craven Editorial Assistant: Lenore Chait Director of Marketing: David Gesell Campaign Marketing Manager: Leigh Ann Sims School Marketing Manager: Laura Cutone Senior Marketing Assistant: Les Roberts Associate Managing Editor: Alexandrina Benedicto Wolf Project Manager: Kris Roach Senior Operations Supervisor: Pat Tonneman Operations Specialist: Deidra Skahill Cover Designer: Jane Diane Ricciardi Cover Art: Kipling Swehla NRAS Product Management Team: Janet Benoit, Megan Meyer, William Nolan, Rachel Peña, and Wendi Safstrom Product Development and Project Management: Emergent Learning, LLC Writing and Text Development: Mary Nunaley Composition: Phil Velikan © Copyright 2011 by the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation (NRAEF) and published by Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Prentice Hall. All rights reserved. Manufactured in the United States of America. This publication is protected by Copyright, and permission should be obtained from NRAEF prior to any prohibited reproduction, storage in a retrieval system, or transmission in any form or any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying or likewise. To obtain permission(s) to use material from this work, please submit written request to Copyright Permissions, National Restaurant Association Solutions, 175 West Jackson Boulevard, Suite 1500, Chicago, IL 60604-2814, Email: permissions@ restaurant.org. The information presented in this book is provided for informational purposes only and is not intended to provide legal advice or establish standards of reasonable behavior. Operators who develop food safety-related policies and procedures are urged to obtain the advice and guidance of legal counsel. Although National Restaurant Association Solutions, LLC (NRA Solutions) endeavors to include accurate and current information compiled from sources believed to be reliable, NRA Solutions, and its licensor, the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation (NRAEF), distributors, and agents make no representations or warranties as to the accuracy, currency, or completeness of the information. No responsibility is assumed or implied by the NRAEF, NRA Solutions, distributors, or agents for any damage or loss resulting from inaccuracies or omissions or any actions taken or not taken based on the content of this publication. Activities may include the use of sharp objects, heat or flame, and professional foodservice equipment. All such activities should be supervised by an instructor responsible for ensuring that proper safety procedures are followed. ServSafe, the ServSafe logo, ServSafe Alcohol, ProStart, and the ProStart logo are trademarks of the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation, and used under license by National Restaurant Association Solutions, LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of the National Restaurant Association. an imprint of PearsonSchool.com/careertech
  3. 3. Table of Contents Table of Contents Chapter 1 Breakfast Food and Sandwiches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Test Your Breakfast Food and Sandwiches IQ Crossword Puzzle—Dairy Products and Eggs Lab—Make Your Own Cheese Webquest—The Incredible Egg Lab—Egg Cookery Lab—Rise and Shine Research/Presentation—Coffee, Tea, or Energy Drinks Lab—Sandwiches Pizza Time Design a Sandwich Shop Activity 1.1 Activity 1.2 Activity 1.3 Activity 1.4 Activity 1.5 Activity 1.6 Activity 1.7 Activity 1.8 Activity 1.9 Activity 1.10 1 3 4 4 5 6 6 7 7 8 Chapter 2 Nutrition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Test Your Knowledge of Nutrition IQ Crossword Puzzle—The ABCs of Nutrition Analysis—Nutrition Labels Healthy Diet—Menu Creation Magazine Article—Debating Fats Design a Magazine Ad Research Paper—Nutrition-Related Diseases Lab—Heart-Healthy Cooking Lab—Recipe Substitutions Presentation—Should GMOs Be Regulated? Activity 2.1 Activity 2.2 Activity 2.3 Activity 2.4 Activity 2.5 Activity 2.6 Activity 2.7 Activity 2.8 Activity 2.9 Activity 2.10 9 11 11 12 13 13 14 15 15 16 Chapter 3 Cost Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Test Your Knowledge of Cost Control IQ Crossword Puzzle—Cost Control Profit-and-Loss Statement Information Costing and Pricing—Gazpacho Case Study—The Cost Control Caper Lab—Yield Test Practice—Menu Markup Case Study—Standard Portion Costs Calculating Selling Prices Poster/Presentation—Implementing Quality Standards in the Kitchen Activity 3.1 Activity 3.2 Activity 3.3 Activity 3.4 Activity 3.5 Activity 3.6 Activity 3.7 Activity 3.8 Activity 3.9 Activity 3.10 17 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 25 26 iii
  4. 4. Table of Contents Chapter 4 Salads and Garnishing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Test Your Knowledge of Salads and Garnishing IQ Crossword Puzzle—Salad Time Lab—Lunch and Dinner Salads Lab—Side Salads Webquest—Salad Anyone? Lab—Dressings and Dips Comparing Fresh and Premade Dips and Dressings Lab—Advanced Garnishes Lab—Chocolate Dessert Garnishes Research—Edible Flowers Activity 4.1 Activity 4.2 Activity 4.3 Activity 4.4 Activity 4.5 Activity 4.6 Activity 4.7 Activity 4.8 Activity 4.9 Activity 4.10 27 29 30 30 30 31 32 33 33 34 Chapter 5 Purchasing and Inventory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Test Your Knowledge of Purchasing and Inventory IQ Crossword Puzzle—Purchasing Career Exploration—The Buyer Product Specifications Lab—Make-or-Buy Analysis Practice Purchase Order Put Your Order In Order Poster—Preventing Spoilage and Cross-Contamination Calculating the Cost of Purchasing Receiving Guidelines Activity 5.1 Activity 5.2 Activity 5.3 Activity 5.4 Activity 5.5 Activity 5.6 Activity 5.7 Activity 5.8 Activity 5.9 Activity 5.10 35 37 37 38 39 39 40 41 42 43 Chapter 6 Meat, Poultry, and Seafood . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Test Your Meat, Poultry, and Seafood IQ Editorial—The Importance of Meat for Good Nutrition Lab— Cooking with Beef Match the Cut to the Best Cooking Technique Lab—How to Cut Chicken 8 Ways Lab—Cooking with Poultry Research—Sushi Lab—Cooking with Seafood Presentation—Sustainable Seafood Menu Design—Sausages around the World iv Activity 6.1 Activity 6.2 Activity 6.3 Activity 6.4 Activity 6.5 Activity 6.6 Activity 6.7 Activity 6.8 Activity 6.9 Activity 6.10 44 45 46 47 47 48 48 49 50 50
  5. 5. Table of Contents Chapter 7 Marketing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Test Your Knowledge of Marketing Crossword Puzzle—Marketing Creating a Marketing Plan Research Customer Habits Design a Sales Promotion for Easy Street Café Classroom Media Group, Inc. Conducting a SWOT analysis Create a Menu Menu Matching Menu Analysis Activity 7.1 Activity 7.2 Activity 7.3 Activity 7.4 Activity 7.5 Activity 7.6 Activity 7.7 Activity 7.8 Activity 7.9 Activity 7.10 51 53 53 54 54 55 55 56 57 57 Chapter 8 Desserts and Baked Goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Test Your Knowledge of Desserts and Baked Goods IQ Timeline—Bread through the Ages Lab—Yeast Breads Lab—Working with Yeast Lab—Quick Breads and Cakes Menu Planning—Expanding the Quick Bread and Cake Offerings Lab—Pies, Pastries, and Cookies Dessert Challenge Lab—Chocolate, Specialty Desserts, and Sauces Lab—Chocolate Molds Activity 8.1 Activity 8.2 Activity 8.3 Activity 8.4 Activity 8.5 Activity 8.6 Activity 8.7 Activity 8.8 Activity 8.9 Activity 8.10 59 61 61 62 63 63 64 64 65 65 Chapter 9 Sustainability in the Restaurant and Foodservice Industry . . . . 67 Test Your Knowledge of Sustainability IQ Crossword Puzzle—Sustainability and the Foodservice Industry Water Conservation Plan Lab—Cooking with Organics Webquest—Energy Conservation Research Energy Efficient Equipment Food Additives and Sustainability Design a Recycling Plan Create a Sustainable Menu Activity 9.1 Activity 9.2 Activity 9.3 Activity 9.4 Activity 9.5 Activity 9.6 Activity 9.7 Activity 9.8 Activity 9.9 67 69 69 70 70 71 72 73 73 v
  6. 6. Table of Contents Chapter 10 Global Cuisine 1—The Americas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 Activity 10.1 Activity 10.2 Activity 10.3 Activity 10.4 Activity 10.5 Activity 10.6 Activity 10.7 Activity 10.8 Activity 10.9 Activity 10.10 Test Your Knowledge of Global Cuisines—The Americas IQ The “Great” Food Debate Clambake Crossword Puzzle—Global Cuisines: The Americas Lab—Cuisine of North America Lab—Cuisine of Central America and the Caribbean Editorial—Stevia: Friend or Foe? Create a Dinner from Central or South America Lab— Food of South America Brochure—A South American Food Adventure 75 76 77 78 79 79 80 80 81 81 Chapter 11 Global Cuisine 2—Europe, the Mediterranean, the Middle East, and Asia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Activity 11.1 Activity 11.2 Activity 11.3 Activity 11.4 Activity 11.5 Activity 11.6 Activity 11.7 Activity 11.8 Activity 11.9 Activity 11.10 vi Test Your Knowledge of Global Cuisines—Europe, the Mediterranean, the Middle East, and Asia IQ Crossword Puzzle—Global Cuisines 2 Lab—European Cuisine Presentation—Modern Chefs and Their Impact on the Culinary Scene Lab—Mediterranean Cuisine News Article—The Mediterranean Diet Lab—Middle Eastern cuisine Flavor Chart—Middle Eastern Cuisine Lab—Asian Cuisine Poster/Presentation—The Role of Geography and Asian Cuisine 82 84 85 85 86 86 87 87 88 88
  7. 7. Table of Contents Welcome This Activity Guide—Teacher’s Edition provides teachers with instructions for setting up each of the activities in the Activity Guide for Foundations of Restaurant Management & Culinary Arts, Level Two. The activities range from simple worksheets, homework assignments, and puzzles to more complex research projects, presentations, case studies, kitchen labs, and role-play activities. This Activity Guide—Teacher’s Edition also includes answer keys and recommended questions for post-activity classroom discussions. Kitchen Lab Activities In addition to different types of objective and interactive exercises, the Activity Guide includes kitchen-lab (cooking) activities. In order to successfully administer and score the kitchen-lab activities, please become familiar with the information and recommendations in this section. Chapter 1, Activity 1.3: Make Your Own Cheese Chapter 1, Activity 1.5: Egg Cookery Chapter 1, Activity 1.6: Rise and Shine Chapter 1, Activity 1.8: Sandwiches Chapter 2, Activity 2.8: Heart-Healthy Cooking Chapter 2, Activity 2.9: Recipe Substitutions Chapter 3, Activity 3.6: Yield Test Chapter 4, Activity 4.3: Lunch and Dinner Salads Chapter 4, Activity 4.4: Side Salads Chapter 4, Activity 4.6: Dressings and Dips Chapter 4, Activity 4.8: Advanced Garnishes Chapter 4, Activity 4.9: Chocolate Dessert Garnishes Chapter 5, Activity 5.5: Make-or-Buy Analysis Chapter 6, Activity 6.3: Cooking with Beef Chapter 6, Activity 6.6: Cooking with Poultry Chapter 6, Activity 6.8: Cooking with Seafood Chapter 8, Activity 8.3: Yeast Breads Chapter 8, Activity 8.4: Working with Yeast Chapter 8, Activity 8.5: Quick Breads and Cakes Chapter 8, Activity 8.7: Pies, Pastries, and Cookies Chapter 8, Activity 8.9: Chocolate, Specialty Desserts, and Sauces Chapter 8, Activity 8.10: Chocolate Molds Chapter 9, Activity 9.4: Cooking with Organics Chapter 10, Activity 10.5: Cuisine of North America Chapter 10, Activity 10.6: Cuisine of Central America and the Caribbean Chapter 10, Activity 10.9: Food of South America Chapter 11, Activity 11.3: European Cuisine Chapter 11, Activity 11.7: Middle Eastern Cuisine Chapter 11, Activity 11.9: Asian Cuisine vii
  8. 8. Welcome Recommended Kitchen Equipment Appliances ■■ Open-burner gas stovetop Broiler Grill Dishwasher Work tables or counters Heavy-duty food processor Conventional or convection oven Walk-in or reach-in cooler Walk-in or reach-in freezer Sink for dishwashing (recommend: three-compartment) Utility sink for handwashing, food washing, etc. Heavy-duty mixer with paddle, wire whip, and dough arm attachments Fryer Automatic slicer ■■ Microwave ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ If the budget allows, you might also consider acquiring a steam-jacketed kettle, a tilting brazier, and a rotisserie. Pots and pans ■■ Stock pots Sauté pans Sheet pans Cake pans Pie pans Loaf pans Sauce pans Skillets Hotel pans Bake or roast pans Tube pans Muffin pans Cookie sheets ■■ Rondeau/Brazier ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ viii
  9. 9. Welcome Utensils and other equipment ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ Cutting boards Knife steel Vegetable peelers Mixing bowls Measuring cups Measuring pitchers Bench scraper China cap Colander Spatulas Tongs Eating utensils Custard cups Aprons Knives (chef, paring, boning, serrated, slicer) Sharpening stone Thermometers Portion scale Measuring spoons Ladles Can opener Strainers Grater Solid and slotted cooking spoons Serving dishes/bowls Glasses/cups Towels Oven mitts/hot pads Whisks Ice cream scoops ix
  10. 10. Welcome Preparing for a Kitchen Lab Activity 1. Select the appropriate recipe(s) in advance. 2. Review ingredient and equipment needs. Plan any substitutions. 3. Purchase and store ingredients. 4. Inspect equipment and tools for safety and proper operation. 5. Review the relevant chapter information with students. 6. Review procedures, techniques, and equipment to be used during the lab activity. 7. Review the relevant food safety procedures that might be a concern during the lab activity. 8. Conduct a demonstration of the preparation and techniques for the recipe(s) selected. During a Kitchen Lab Activity Monitor students and provide feedback. After Completing a Kitchen Lab Activity Follow the standard instructor debrief for kitchen lab activities. Standard Instructor Debrief for Kitchen Lab Activities Have students sample portions of the items created by the other students. The students/teams should describe to the other students/teams the process they followed to prepare their recipes. Ask students some or all of the following questions: ■■ What did you like about the recipe? ■■ ■■ What improvements could be made to the recipe? ■■ Did anything go wrong with the recipe? If yes, why? ■■ How could you make the recipe more nutritious? ■■ How could you make the recipe more economical? ■■ Which ingredients could you substitute with lower-cost ingredients? ■■ How could the recipe be adapted for people with specific allergies or dietary restrictions, such as vegetarians or vegans? ■■ Are there any ingredients not used in this recipe that you think would add flavor, texture, etc., to the recipe? If yes, which ones? ■■ What would you do differently if you were going to prepare this recipe again? ■■ Do you think this recipe would appeal to a variety of customers? ■■ How long will this recipe remain fresh? ■■ Could this food item be prepared ahead of time? Why or why not? ■■ If there was limited time to prepare this recipe, which parts of the recipe (if any) could be prepared ahead of time? ■■ x What did you dislike about the recipe? Are there any time-saving techniques that you could use to prepare this item? If yes, what are the pluses and minuses of using those techniques?
  11. 11. Welcome Evaluating and Scoring Student Performance on Kitchen Lab Activities A recommended evaluation/scoring rubric is provided on the following page for your use. Additional details related to bonus points and grading guidelines follow the rubric. A sample kitchen lab score record is also included. Educators are authorized to make copies of the score record form for use in their classrooms. xi
  12. 12. Welcome Bonus Points At the teacher’s discretion, bonus points should be considered and awarded to students who go above and beyond expectations during the activity. Examples of exceptional performance might include: ■■ Positive attitude ■■ Helpfulness and patience with other students ■■ Willingness to take on extra tasks; volunteering ■■ Performance of complicated or advanced techniques or tasks Final Score The final score is determined by adding together the evaluation score and the bonus points. That number is then compared to the number of points possible (50 points per activity). Educators should apply their own classroom grading scales to the final score amounts. It is recommended that students achieve an average score of at least 31 points to satisfactorily pass each lab. Sample Grading Systems xii
  13. 13. Welcome xiii
  14. 14. Chapter 1 | Breakfast Food and Sandwiches Chapter 1 Activity 1.1 Test Your Breakfast Food and Sandwiches IQ Instructor Setup Before beginning Chapter 1: Breakfast Food and Sandwiches, have students complete the “Test Your Breakfast Food and Sandwiches IQ” test. Part 1—Dairy Products and Eggs F _ 1. Pasteurization refers to the process of killing microorganisms to make milk safe to drink, while homogenization refers to the process used to break down fat and blend milk into one fluid. F _ 2. A person who is lactose intolerant does not have an allergy to milk; instead, it is a digestive reaction to dairy products. T _ 3. T _ 4. F _ 5. All cheeses are made up of varying parts of water, fat, and protein, and these determine the texture and flavor of the cheese. T _ 6. T _ 7. T _ 8. Part 2—Breakfast Foods and Drinks T _ 1. F _ 2. Bacon is approximately 70 percent fat and shrinks considerably when cooked. F _ 3. Hash is a dish made of chopped meat, potatoes, and onions and should not be confused with hash-browned potatoes. T _ 4. T _ 5. F _ 6. When brewing coffee, it is important to begin with fresh, cold water and heat to proper brewing temperature. 1
  15. 15. Chapter 1 | Breakfast Food and Sandwiches T _ 7. F _ 8. Hot beverages such as coffee do not maintain their flavor well and should be served within an hour after brewing. Part 3—Sandwiches T _ 1. T _ 2. F _ 3. A panini is made using a panini press. T _ 4. F _5 A small, open-faced sandwich served as an hors d’oeuvre is called a canapé. T _ 6. T _ 7. F _ 8. Sandwich stations require ingredients and equipment such as a work table, storage facility, and hand tools. Instructor Debrief Review the correct answers with the students. Once you have completed Chapter 1, ask the students to complete the activity again. Then, ask them the following questions: 1. How have their scores improved? 2. What were three things they learned in the chapter that surprised them? 3. After reading the chapter, were they going to try any new breakfast foods or sandwich combinations? 2
  16. 16. Chapter 1 | Breakfast Food and Sandwiches Activity 1.2 Crossword Puzzle—Dairy Products and Eggs Instructor Setup Have students review the material in Section 1.1, “Dairy Products and Eggs.” After reviewing the material, have them prepare to complete the crossword puzzle by completing the statements. Instructor Debrief Review the answers with students, and discuss any outstanding questions. 3
  17. 17. Chapter 1 | Breakfast Food and Sandwiches Activity 1.3 Lab—Make Your Own Cheese Instructor Setup Review the key elements of cheese from the chapter, and discuss the different types of cheese with the class. If possible, provide samples of soft and hard cheeses for students to sample, for example, ricotta, cottage cheese, cream cheese, mozzarella, cheddar, and Parmesan. After the students have had an opportunity to see and taste a variety of cheeses, discuss the cheese-making process and explain that they will have an opportunity to make their own soft cheese. Instructor Debrief After the students have had the opportunity to make cheese, lead them in a discussion about the following: 1. Compare and contrast the farmer’s cheese you prepared to the cheese that you purchased. 2. Analyze the time it took to prepare this cheese. How would that affect cost? 3. Describe dishes you could use this cheese in. 4. Identify other ingredients you could add for a new flavor and compare how that would change taste or use. Activity 1.4 Webquest—The Incredible Egg Instructor Setup Review the section on eggs in the chapter, and then explain to the students that they will be going on a Webquest. A Webquest is a journey on the Web looking for specific information about a product or topic. This Webquest will focus on the egg. Egg Cookery 1. Answers will vary. 2. Answers will vary. 3. Answers will vary. Egg Safety 1. Salmonella spp. is found in the intestinal tracts of animals, birds, and humans—virtually all living creatures—and can be found on the egg shell if the hen was infected. Salmonella spp. is destroyed by heat, and properly handled eggs do not present a problem. 2. Eggs vary in color for a number of reasons. Cloudy egg whites are an indication that the eggs are fresh, while pink egg whites indicate spoilage. 4
  18. 18. Chapter 1 | Breakfast Food and Sandwiches Specialty Eggs 1. Organic eggs must meet specific government standards. They are produced by hens that have been fed feed that has not been grown with any type of pesticide, herbicide, commercial fertilizer, etc. 2. Free-range eggs come from hens that are raised outdoors or have access to the outdoors. Cage-free eggs come from hens that are living indoors, but have access to open space. No specific government standard is applied to either free-range or cage-free eggs. Egg Products 1. 66 2. 1,646,320 (1998); 2,047,776 (2008) Incredible Edible Egg 1. Answers will vary. 2. Answers will vary. Instructor Debrief A fter students have completed this activity, lead them in a discussion of the following questions: 1. As a future foodservice professional, how important is it to your career for you to know where to find resources online when you need a new recipe or quick fact? 2. Which site was most appealing? Why? 3. Which site did you find least useful? Why? 4. What was the most interesting or unique thing that you learned after visiting these sites? Activity 1.5 Lab—Egg Cookery Instructor Setup Review and follow instructions found in the Lab Activities section at the front of the book. Review basic food-preparation concepts from Chapter 1: Breakfast Food and Sandwiches. Select an egg recipe for the class to prepare. Review the recipe, and read the lab introduction to the class. Instructor Debrief After the students have completed the lab, lead them in a discussion about the following: 1. What did you like about the recipe? 2. Describe several different types of egg dishes and their preparation methods. 3. Was this something you would try to make at home? 4. Did anything go wrong with the recipe? If so, what? 5
  19. 19. Chapter 1 | Breakfast Food and Sandwiches 5. What would you do differently if you were going to prepare this recipe again? 6. Were there any substitutions or changes that you would make to the recipe? Activity 1.6 Lab—Rise and Shine Instructor Setup Review and follow instructions found in the Lab Activities section at the front of the book. Review basic food-preparation concepts from Chapter 1: Breakfast Food and Sandwiches. Select a breakfast recipe for the class to prepare. Review the recipe, and read the lab introduction to the class. Instructor Debrief After the students have completed the lab, lead them in a discussion about the following: 1. What did you like about the recipe? 2. Was this something you would try to make at home? 3. Did anything go wrong with the recipe? If so, what? 4. What would you do differently if you were going to prepare this recipe again? 5. Were there any substitutions or changes that you would make to the recipe? Activity 1.7 Research/Presentation—Coffee, Tea, or Energy Drinks Instructor Setup Review the material on breakfast beverages with the class, and then discuss the differences between coffee, tea, and energy drinks. Ask the students their opinion on the importance of beverages to enhance the morning meal, and explain that they will be researching a variety of morning beverage options. Instructor Debrief After students have completed their report and presentation, lead them in a discussion about the following: 1. Did any pieces of information from their research surprise them? If so, what were they? 2. Do they think that energy drinks are gaining respectability as a morning beverage? If so, why? 3. When dining out, which breakfast beverage do they prefer? 6
  20. 20. Chapter 1 | Breakfast Food and Sandwiches Activity 1.8 Lab—Sandwiches Instructor Setup Review and follow the instructions for food labs found at the front of the book. Review common sandwich preparations from Chapter 1: Breakfast Foods and Sandwiches with the class. Select a recipe for the class to prepare. Review the recipe, and read the lab introduction to the class. Instructor Debrief After the students have completed the lab, lead them in a discussion about the following: 1. What did you like about the recipe? 2. Was this something you would try to make at home? 3. Did anything go wrong with the recipe? If so, what? 4. What would you do differently if you were going to prepare this recipe again? 5. Were there any substitutions or changes that you would make to the recipe? Activity 1.9 Pizza Time Instructor Setup In this activity, students will work in teams. In order to complete the task, they will need to create a menu, research pizza recipes, and create a spreadsheet that can be used by the chef to properly order the ingredients needed for this event. Instructor Debrief After the students have completed the task, lead them in a discussion about the following: 1. What was the most challenging part of the task? 2. Were you able to use the information provided in Chapter 1 to help create the pizza menu? 3. If the audience had been different, how would you have varied the types of pizza? For example, if it was group of football players? 4. Did anyone consider including a dessert pizza as part of the menu? If not, why not? 7
  21. 21. Chapter 1 | Breakfast Food and Sandwiches Activity 1.10 Design a Sandwich Shop Instructor Setup Lead students in a discussion regarding the unique needs of a sandwich shop in terms of equipment, product, and layout. Have the students brainstorm the types of equipment needed and discuss how they would organize the front of the house and back of the house. After the brainstorming session, divide students in teams of two to four, and ask them to design a sandwich shop that would incorporate a safe work flow, adhere to safety standards (especially as they apply to TCS food), and use the proper equipment. In order to create the workspace, students also need to create a core menu for the shop to determine refrigeration needs, etc. Students can design their sandwich shop using a computer program or by hand on a poster board. Encourage students to conduct additional research by visiting local sandwich shops, using the Internet, and rereading the appropriate material in their text. Students will present their final design to their classmates. Instructor Debrief After the presentations have been completed, lead the students in a discussion about the following: 1. Was it more difficult to design an entire restaurant concept or just a kitchen? 2. Do you think it is easier to design for a single concept (i.e., sandwiches), or for a wider variety of food options (i.e., full-service restaurant)? 3. What was the most challenging aspect of this project? 4. What additional information would have been helpful in completing this project? 8
  22. 22. Chapter 2 | Nutrition Chapter 2 Activity 2.1 Test Your Knowledge of Nutrition IQ Instructor Setup Before beginning Chapter 2: Nutrition, have students complete the “Test Your Knowledge of Nutrition IQ” test. Part 1—The Basics of Nutrition F _ 1. Nutrition is the study of the nutrients in food and how they nourish the body. T _ 2. T _ 3. F _ 4. Phytochemicals are the chemicals that aid the body in fighting diseases. T _ 5. F _ 6. Carbohydrates are a main source of energy for the body and are needed by the body to utilize protein and fat efficiently. T _ 7. F _ 8. There are 20 amino acids found in food, and 9 of them are known as the essential amino acids because they can only be obtained from food. T _ 9. T _10. T _11. T _12. Part 2—Making Menu Items More Nutritious T _ 1. F _ 2. FIFO (first in, first out) is one of the most effective methods used for ensuring product freshness in the kitchen. 9
  23. 23. Chapter 2 | Nutrition F _ 3. Eating raw foods, especially fruits and vegetables, can provide nutritious options, but some foods provide more nutrients after cooking. T _ 4. F _ 5. Batch cooking is a process that allows the reheating of smaller portions of food to be served when needed. T _ 6. F _ 7. Kosher salt has a purer flavor than table salt and is somewhat coarser. It is frequently used in commercial kitchens in place of table salt. T _ 8. T _ 9. F _10. Genetically modified foods may provide additional nutritional value or may be more disease-resistant. Instructor Debrief Review the correct answers with the students. Once you have completed Chapter 2, ask the students to complete the activity again. Then, ask them the following questions: 1. How have their scores improved? 2. What were three things they learned in the chapter that surprised them? 3. After reading the chapter, are there any modifications they can make to their personal diets to improve their nutrition? What about family members? What are two steps they can take to improve their nutrition starting today? 10
  24. 24. Chapter 2 | Nutrition Activity 2.2 Crossword Puzzle—The ABCs of Nutrition Instructor Setup Have students review the material in Section 2.1, “The Basics of Nutrition.” Then, have them prepare to complete the crossword puzzle by completing the statements. Instructor Debrief Review the answers with students, and discuss any outstanding questions. Activity 2.3 Analysis—Nutrition Labels Instructor Setup For this activity, you will need a variety of labels from various items including produce, snacks, condiments, baked goods, meat, seafood, beverages, and prepared meals. You can find many of these labels online by searching diet and nutrition sites or the manufacturers’ sites. Many restaurant chains also offer labels on-site or online that can be used by the students for this activity. Review with students the information provided on nutrition labels, and lead them in a discussion about the importance of nutrition labeling. 11
  25. 25. Chapter 2 | Nutrition Present the class with a collection of nutrition labels for review and comparison, and ask students to complete the questions listed in the worksheet. Optional Activity 1 Provide students with a list of commonly used foods or a menu for a day, and have them research the labels and then conduct an analysis. Optional Activity 2 Have students research their favorite quick-service or fast-casual meal, and conduct a nutritional analysis of that meal. Compare the results to a similar meal prepared from scratch at home. Optional Activity 3 Have students research their favorite meal from two different restaurants, and conduct a nutritional analysis of that meal. Then, create a word wall, with several different restaurants shown—for example, two different quickservice restaurants and two different family-style restaurants—and have students compare and contrast the differences between the meals at each. Analyze why similar foods have different nutritional information. Activity Enhancement Invite a registered dietitian to visit the class, and discuss the basics of analyzing food labels, shopping for healthy foods, and the importance of eating a well-balanced, healthy diet. To locate a registered dietitian, contact the American Dietetic Association at 1-800-366-1655 or visit them online at www.eatright.org. Instructor Debrief Answers will vary depending on the labels provided and the types of food analyzed. Where students have a difference of opinion, review the labels and discuss this with the class. Then, lead the class in a discussion by asking the following questions: 1. Which food items did you think were the most healthful? Why? 2. Did students list the same items for questions 1 and 2 on their worksheets? If not, why? Is it possible to have something with a higher fat percentage but not necessarily the most fat per serving? If yes, why? 3. Were there any surprises in terms of the nutritional content in foods that the students regularly ate? If so, what? 4. What steps can students take to make their diets more healthful? Activity 2.4 Healthy Diet—Menu Creation Instructor Setup Review the material in Section 2.1, “The Basics of Nutrition,” that covers malnutrition and diseases that are related to poor diet. Divide students into teams of two or three, and have them create a week’s worth of healthy menus for someone who needs nutritional support. The students will create a menu plan that includes five recipes and the reasons why these are good choices for the type of diet selected. Students will select from the following options: vegetarian teen; vegetarian adult; heart healthy; diabetic; someone who is trying to lose weight; someone who is trying to gain weight; a runner, a football player, or a swimmer. 12
  26. 26. Chapter 2 | Nutrition Instructor Debrief Ask the students to share elements from their menus with the class, and then lead the class in a discussion about the following: 1. Why did you select the food items that you did for your client? 2. What was the most challenging part of the task? 3. Do you think it is easier to follow a healthy diet when you have a meal plan or when you must make your own food decisions for each meal? 4. What was the most interesting thing you learned from this project? Activity 2.5 Magazine Article—Debating Fats Instructor Setup Lead students in a discussion about the role of fat in the diet. Have students brainstorm different sources of fat in their diet. After the brainstorming session, discuss the differences among the types of fats. Ask the students to write a 200–250 word magazine article about the role fat plays in the diet and steps to take to reduce fat. Instructor Debrief After the students have submitted their essays, lead them in a discussion about the following: 1. When writing an article or essay, how important is it to get directly to the facts when there is a word limit? Did the essay’s word limit cut back on the information you would have provided? 2. What was the most interesting thing you learned about fat while researching this essay? 3. What are two things you learned that will allow you to improve the nutritiousness of your diet as a result of this essay? Activity 2.6 Design a Magazine Ad Instructor Setup Review the material in Section 2.1 about vitamins and water. Introduce students to the concept of the RDA and also the importance of ensuring that the proper vitamins are consumed each day through diet or a vitamin supplement. Continue the discussion with information about proper hydration and the need to consume enough water every day, and the role water plays in maintaining a healthy weight. Divide students into teams of two to four, and have them create a one-page ad for either a multivitamin or for bottled water. The ad should address the nutritional benefits/health reasons for using the product and the importance these play in maintaining good health. Have students research ads regarding vitamins and water. These can be from print magazines or online. 13
  27. 27. Chapter 2 | Nutrition Optional Activity Divide the class in half. Assign half of the class the task of designing ads about vitamins and water. Assign the other half the task of researching myths associated with bottled water and vitamin supplements, and compare that to the facts related to bottled water and vitamin supplements. Have the two groups present their research and ads, and then have the class vote to decide which group had the most compelling information. Instructor Debrief Have students present their ads to their classmates, and then lead the class in a discussion about the following: 1. Is it easier to share important nutritional information in an article or a print ad? 2. What was the most challenging part about designing the ad? 3. Why is it important for chefs or culinary professionals to be able to present important key information using visuals and limited words? Activity 2.7 Research Paper—Nutrition-Related Diseases Instructor Setup Students will research one disease/illness that has nutrition-related causes. In their research, they will look at a variety of factors and present a plan to help make people more aware of the disease/illness. To prepare students for this assignment, review Section 2.2 in the text with them, and also introduce them to several Web sites that are related to the diseases being explored. These sites can include: ■■ American Diabetes Association: www.diabetes.org ■■ American Heart Association: www.heart.org ■■ The Obesity Society: www.obesity.org ■■ My Pyramid: www.mypyramid.gov ■■ National Osteoporosis Foundation: www.nof.org ■■ National Kidney Foundation: www.kidney.org Instructor Debrief After the students have submitted their papers, lead the class in a discussion about the following: 1. What was the most surprising thing you learned about the ailment you selected to research? 2. What types of information are available for people who want to learn more about their particular ailment? 3. How did you decide which information was accurate? 4. Do you know anyone who is suffering from the particular ailment you selected? If so, how has this affected his or her life? 14
  28. 28. Chapter 2 | Nutrition Activity 2.8 Lab—Heart-Healthy Cooking Instructor Setup Review and follow instructions found in the Lab Activities section at the front of the book. Review basic foodpreparation concepts. Select a recipe for the class to prepare. Review the recipe, and read the lab introduction to the class. Instructor Debrief After the students have completed the lab, lead them in a discussion about the following: 1. What did you like about the recipe? 2. Was this something you would try to make at home? 3. Did anything go wrong with the recipe? If so, what and why? 4. What would you do differently if you were going to prepare this recipe again? 5. Were there any substitutions or changes that you would make to the recipe? Activity 2.9 Lab—Recipe Substitutions Instructor Setup Review and follow instructions found in the Lab Activities section at the front of the book. Review basic food-preparation concepts. Select a recipe for the class to prepare. Review the recipe, and read the lab introduction to the class. Optional Activity Create a chart with columns such as texture, moisture, taste, structure, etc. Have students complete the chart comparing the traditional item and the low-fat item. Have students discuss the differences and also ways to make low-fat items taste good. Instructor Debrief After the students have completed the lab, lead them in a discussion about the following: 1. What did you like about the recipe? 2. Was this something you would try to make at home? 3. Did anything go wrong with the recipe? If so, what? 4. What would you do differently if you were going to prepare this recipe again? 5. Which version of the recipe did you prefer? Can taste be sacrificed in order to achieve dietary goals? 15
  29. 29. Chapter 2 | Nutrition Activity 2.10 Presentation—Should GMOs Be Regulated? Instructor Setup Review the section on genetically modified organisms (GMOs) with the class. Then, explain to students that they will be researching GMO foods and debating whether the government should regulate these foods or not. Explain to students that they will be presenting either in favor or against GMOs. You may select the students for each side or have students self-select. The following Web sites will provide helpful information: ■■ Whole Foods—Values overview: www.wholefoodsmarket.com/values ■■ Monsanto—Conversations about plant biotechnology: www.monsanto.com/biotech-gmo/asp/default.asp ■■ The Center for Food Safety: www. truefoodnow.org ■■ PBS—Harvest of Fear: www.pbs.org/wgbh/harvest Instructor Debrief After the students have given their presentations, lead the class in a discussion about the following: 1. Is the debate over GMOs necessary? Why or why not? 2. After doing the research, were they surprised by any of the foods they ate being modified? 3. In the students’ opinion, has the increase in GMOs altered the health of people? If so, how? 16
  30. 30. Chapter 3 | Cost Control Chapter 3 Activity 3.1 Test Your Knowledge of Cost Control IQ Instructor Setup Before beginning the chapter, have students complete the “Test Your Knowledge of Cost Control IQ” test. Part 1—Introduction to Cost Control F _ 1. In order for any business to be successful, costs must be lower than revenue (or sales). T _ 2. T _ 3. F _ 4. An operating budget is a financial plan for a specific time period that provides a tool for managing costs. T _ 5. T _ 6. F _ 7. Full-line suppliers are companies that carry everything from equipment to food and supplies, basically a onestop shop. Part 2—Controlling Food Costs F _ 1. The flow of food process is a seven-step process that begins with purchasing. T _ 2. F _ 3. Total food cost percentage is a standard used to judge performance and will vary based on sales and product purchased. T _ 4. F _ 5. The edible-portion method of costing uses the cost of an ingredient after it has been trimmed and cleaned. The as-purchased method of costing uses the cost of an ingredient before any trim or waste. T _ 6. T _ 7. 17
  31. 31. Chapter 3 | Cost Control Part 3—Controlling Labor Costs T _ 1. F _ 2. Several factors play a role in labor costs, including business volume, employee turnover, and the organization’s standards. T _ 3. F _ 4. The restaurant industry is the second-largest employer in the country, after the U.S. government, employing 13 million people. T _ 5. T _ 6.. F _ 7. Cross-training is an effective strategy for increasing productivity and making employees more effective in the operation. Part 4— Controlling Quality Standards T _ 1. F _ 2. The best time to receive deliveries is when the operation is staffed and the items can be received in a safe and efficient manner. T _ 3. T _ 4. F _ 5. A physical inventory is conducted on a regular basis and is done by counting and recording every item in the storeroom. F _ 6. According to the National Restaurant Association, 75 percent of all inventory shortages are due to employee theft. Instructor Debrief Review the correct answers with the students. Once you have completed Chapter 3, ask the students to complete the activity again. Then, ask them the following questions: 1. How have their scores improved? 2. What were three things they learned in the chapter that surprised them? 3. After reading the chapter, what part of the cost-control process appears to be the most challenging for a manager? 4. What steps would they take if they were a chef or restaurant manager to minimize waste in the restaurant? 18
  32. 32. Chapter 3 | Cost Control Activity 3.2 Crossword Puzzle—Cost Control Instructor Setup Have students review the material in Chapter 3: Cost Control. After reviewing the material, have them prepare to complete the crossword puzzle by finishing the statements. Instructor Debrief Review the answers with students, and discuss any outstanding questions. 19
  33. 33. Chapter 3 | Cost Control Activity 3.3 Profit-and-Loss Statement Information Instructor Setup Have students complete the exercises according to the directions provided. Encourage students to review Section 3.1, “Introduction to Cost Control.” Part 1 Information Order on P&L Statement 1. Cost of Sales B 2. Net Income E 3. Sales A 4. Expenses C 5. Income D Part 2—Answers 1. Bottom line 2. Income statement 3. Depending on the operation, they may be prepared monthly, quarterly, or annually. 4. In order to be profitable, the operation must ensure that income exceeds expenses. This can be done by controlling expenses, such as scheduling properly, reducing waste, or increasing sales. Bonus Question 5. The banquet department brought in $191,862. $436,050  0.44= $191,862 Instructor Debrief Review the correct answers with the students. Answer any questions, and then lead them in a discussion about the following: 1. Why is it important to review the P&L (or income statement) on a regular basis? 2. What happens to businesses that don’t review the P&L regularly? 3. If you were the chef of a restaurant, what information would be most helpful for you to manage a successful operation? 4. What is the most challenging part about working with financial information? 20
  34. 34. Chapter 3 | Cost Control Activity 3.4 Costing and Pricing—Gazpacho Instructor Setup Ask students to complete the worksheet according to the directions. Review the material in Section 3.2, “Controlling Food Costs,” with the students in addition to reviewing basic equations for determining cost. Part 1 1. $0.30 ($36.22 ÷ 120 oz = $0.302 per oz) 2. $1.81 ($0.302 per oz ÷ 6 oz = $1.81 per serving) 3. $6.70 ($1.81 ÷ 0.27 = $6.70 per serving) Gazpacho Yield: 20 servings Ingredient Tomatoes Cucumbers Onions Green bell peppers Crushed garlic Breadcrumbs Tomato juice Red wine vinegar Olive oil Salt Pepper Lemon juice Serving Size: 6 oz Amount 63/4 lb 64 oz 24 oz 11/2 lb 1 oz 32 oz 11/4 qt 8 oz 16 oz To taste To taste 5 tbsp Cost of Ingredient $2.45 lb $9.50, 15-lb box $0.65 lb $3.18 lb $3.15 lb $4.29, 3-lb box $6.25, 1/2 gal $2.75 pt $1.25 c $ 0.15 per recipe $ 0.15 recipe $0.25 recipe Total Cost $16.54 $2.53 $0.98 $4.77 $0.20 $2.86 $3.91 $1.38 $2.50 $0.15 $0.15 $0.25 $36.22 Part 2 1. $0.30 ($145.07 ÷ 480 = $0.302 per oz) 2. $1.21 ($0.302 per oz  4 oz = $1.208 per serving) 3. $4.48 ($1.21÷ 0.27 = $4.48; or rounded to $4.50) 21
  35. 35. Chapter 3 | Cost Control Gazpacho Yield: 120 servings Ingredient Tomatoes Cucumbers Onions Green bell peppers Crushed garlic Breadcrumbs Tomato juice Red wine vinegar Olive oil Salt Pepper Lemon juice Serving Size: 4 oz Amount 27 lb 16 lb 6 lb 6 lb 4 oz 8 lb 11/4 qt 1 qt 2 qt To taste To taste ¼c Cost of Ingredient $2.45 lb $9.50, 15-lb box $0.65 lb $3.18 lb $3.15 lb $4.29, 3-lb box $6.25, 1/2 gal $2.75 pt $1.25 c $0.60 recipe $0.60 recipe $1.25 recipe Total Cost $66.15 $10.13 $3.90 $19.08 $0.79 $2.86 $11.44 $5.50 $10.00 $0.60 $0.60 $1.25 $145.07 Instructor Debrief Review correct answers with students. Discuss any outstanding questions related to this exercise. Activity 3.5 Case Study—The Cost Control Caper Instructor Setup Ask students to read the case study. Then, divide students into groups of four or five, and have them answer the questions that follow the case study together. Case Study—Answers 1. The Chocolate Mountain’s cost of food for September is calculated as follows: $1,700.00 Opening inventory + 8,500.00 Purchases $10,200.00 Total available for sale - 1,950.00 Closing inventory $ 8,250.00 Cost of items sold Since food sales for September were $14,400.00, the food cost percentage is $8,250.00 ÷ $14,400.00 = 0.57 or 57%. 1. No, this is much too high. 2. The first question that students should ask is, “What cost controls are in place?” Students should help The Chocolate Mountain establish better cost-controls. Without them, it doesn’t matter how many customers dine at the establishment—the lack of cost control measures will put the operation out of business. The Chocolate Mountain might also have to raise its prices in order to lower the food-cost percentage. 22
  36. 36. Chapter 3 | Cost Control Students should use the formula: Item cost ÷ Food cost percentage = Selling price This formula, along with specific numerical examples, illustrates that as the selling price goes up, food cost percentage goes down. 3. With respect to the illegible handwriting of some servers, the manager can purchase printed sales checks so that servers can circle the ordered items. Since the servers won’t have to write out complete orders, they might take the time to write in any special instructions more carefully. Another option would be to purchase a computerized point-of-sale system that would record all orders and print tickets in the kitchen and for the guests. The original cost may be high, but the long-term savings may be worth the investment. In response to the complaints about small tips, the manager should make sure that servers know how to calculate their gratuities. For 15 percent checks, for example, the formula 0.15  Check total = Tip is used. Students might also suggest that a tip table be available for all servers to help them calculate the checks. Instructor Debrief After students create their answers to the Cost Control Caper, select one spokesperson from each group to present his or her group’s findings and suggestions to the class. Then, lead the class in a discussion about the following: 1. Did anything about the results of the case study surprise you? If so, what? 2. What are some additional steps you would take as the manager to decrease employee errors? Why? 3. What are some other tricks you know for calculating tips? Why is it important for servers to know how to calculate their tips? Activity 3.6 Lab—Yield Test Instructor Setup Lead students in a discussion about the importance of standard recipes. After discussing why standard recipes are used, ask students how important it is to know the yields of raw ingredients. Explain to the students that they will be conducting yield tests in the kitchen to compare their produce cleaning skills to common norms. Supplies required ■■ Raw whole carrots (approximately 1½ medium carrots = 1 cup shredded) ■■ Raw whole potatoes (approximately 1–2 medium potatoes = 1 cup chopped potato) ■■ Raw whole apples (approximately 1 medium apple = 1 cup chopped apple) ■■ Scale to measure Optional Activity Have students prepare the potatoes and apples with peel on and without peel and record the yields. 23
  37. 37. Chapter 3 | Cost Control Instructor Debrief After the students have completed the yield test, lead them in a discussion about the following: 1. Why is it important for a chef to know that all of the cooks can prepare raw produce in the same manner? 2. Does it make a difference to the success of a restaurant if the yields vary from cook to cook? Why or why not? 3. What did you learn from this activity? Activity 3.7 Practice—Menu Markup Instructor Setup Ask students to calculate the answers to the questions provided. Additional Activity Collect a variety of menus from local restaurants or print them from online sites that provide menus. Create additional math problems for students to solve. 1. $8.63 is the total bill $6.25 + $1.25 +$1.50 = $9.00 $9.00  90% = $8.10 $8.10  0.65 = $ 0.53 2. Ms. Peterson’s meal costs more ($7.75 before tax versus $7.56 for Kellie’s meal). 3. The server will get $1.02. $2.25  5 = $11.25 $11.25  .065 = $0.73 $11.25 + $0.73 = $11.98 $13.00 - $11.98 = $1.02 4. 24 bars per case  2 cases = 48 bars 48  $2.25 menu price = $108.00 in lost revenue 5. $15.50  2 = $31.00 dollar value of inventory 6. $15.50 ÷ 24 = $0.6458, or $0.65 per ice cream bar 7. $0.65  0.75 = $0.49 $0.65 + $0.49 = $1.14 or $1.10 rounded Instructor Debrief Review the correct answers with students. Use their performance on these questions to assess any gaps in their math skills that may need more practice before introducing more complex problems. Then, lead students in a discussion about the following: 1. Were any of these calculations more difficult to perform than others? If so, which ones? 2. Was any information missing that you needed to perform the calculations? If you were in the workplace and were asked to do this, where could you find the missing information? 24
  38. 38. Chapter 3 | Cost Control Activity 3.8 Case Study—Standard Portion Costs Instructor Setup Ask students to read the information provided and then complete the problems that follow. 1. $0.58 $3.49 per whole pie ÷ 6 slices = $0.5816, rounded to $0.58 2. $0.59 $4.69 per whole pie ÷ 8 slices = $0.5862, rounded to $0.59 3. $0.60 $100.25 ÷ 166 slices = $0.6039, rounded to $0.60 4. $0.25 $3.99 ÷ 16 oz = $0.2493, rounded to $0.25 5. $0.68 16 oz ÷ 6 slices = 2.66 oz, rounded to 2.7; 2.7 oz  $0.25 = $0.675, rounded to $0.68 Instructor Debrief After the students have completed the activity, review the correct answers with them. Discuss any problems they did not understand. Activity 3.9 Calculating Selling Prices Review Section 3.2 and 3.4 with the students, and then have students complete the worksheet following the instructions. D. 1 B. 2 A. 3 C. 4 B. 5 C. 6 Part 2 1. $7.50 $1.94 ÷ $0.26 = 7.462, rounded up to $7.50 2. 24% $1.67 ÷ $7.00 = 0.2386, rounded to 0.24 25
  39. 39. Chapter 3 | Cost Control 3. $5.00 $1.67  2 = $3.34; $3.34 + $1.67 = $5.01, rounded to $5.00 4. $4.50 $1.67 + $2.82 = $4.49, rounded to $4.50 5. 37% $1.67 ÷ $4.50 = 0.3711, rounded to 37% Instructor Debrief Review the correct answers with the students. Discuss any outstanding questions related to this exercise, and then lead students in a discussion about other factors that might be considered when pricing the menu. Discuss the relative pros and cons of the different menu pricing methods. Activity 3.10 Poster/Presentation—Implementing Quality Standards in the Kitchen Instructor Setup Lead students in a discussion about the role of quality standards in the kitchen, and review the food-flow process focusing on purchasing, receiving, and storing. Have students work in teams of two to create a poster/presentation that focuses on at least three measures that can be taken in each of the three key areas to improve quality in the kitchen. Instructor Debrief After the presentations have been displayed, lead the students in a discussion about the following: 1. How difficult was it to decide on three quality measures for each of the key areas? 2. How important is it for employees to understand the role of purchasing and storing in terms of providing high-quality products? 3. What did you learn from this project? 26
  40. 40. Chapter 4 | Salads and Garnishing Chapter 4 Activity 4.1 Test Your Knowledge of Salads and Garnishing IQ Instructor Setup Before beginning the chapter, have students complete the “Test Your Knowledge of Salads and Garnishing IQ” test. Part 1—Salads F _ 1. The three keys to ensuring a quality salad are to use the freshest ingredients, have the ingredients blend together in harmony, and make sure the salad has eye appeal. T _ 2. T _ 3. F _ 4. Salad dressings are used to hold the salad together and may be made from mayonnaise, vinaigrette, or even a cold sauce for a fruit salad. F _ 5. A bound salad is primarily made from cooked ingredients, such as meat, poultry, or a starch, such as potato. T _ 6. T _ 7. Part 2—Salad Dressings and Dips T _ 1. T _ 2. T _ 3. F _ 4. Mayonnaise-based dressings should be applied as close to service as possible to prevent the salads from wilting. F _ 5. Hummus is a dip made from chick peas, garlic, and tahini. T _ 6. 27
  41. 41. Chapter 4 | Salads and Garnishing Part 3—Garnishes T _ 1. F _ 2. A garnish is an essential part of the dish and should be carefully planned. T _ 3. T _ 4. F _ 5. Napping is a technique used to drizzle a design on the dessert plate or on a dessert. T _ 6. Instructor Debrief Review the correct answers with the students. Once you have completed Chapter 4, ask the students to complete the activity again. Then, ask them the following questions: 1. How have their scores improved? 2. What are three things they learned in the chapter that surprised them? 3. After reading the chapter, are they going to try any new salads or dips? 28
  42. 42. Chapter 4 | Salads and Garnishing Activity 4.2 Crossword Puzzle—Salad Time Instructor Setup Have students review the material in Chapter 4: Salads and Garnishing. After reviewing the material, have them prepare to complete the crossword puzzle by filling in the statements. Instructor Debrief Review the answers with students, and discuss any outstanding questions. 29
  43. 43. Chapter 4 | Salads and Garnishing Activity 4.3 Lab—Lunch and Dinner Salads Instructor Setup Review and follow instructions found in the Lab Activities section at the front of the book. Review the information provided in Chapter 4 about the parts of a salad and the different types of salads. Instructor Debrief After the students have completed the lab, lead them in a discussion about the following: 1. What did you like about the recipe? 2. Was this something you would try to make at home? 3. Did anything go wrong with the recipe? If so, what? 4. What would you do differently if you were going to prepare this recipe again? 5. Were there any substitutions or changes that you would make to the recipe? Activity 4.4 Lab—Side Salads Instructor Setup Review and follow instructions found in the Lab Activities section at the front of the book. Instructor Debrief After the students have completed the lab, lead them in a discussion about the following: 1. What did you like about the recipe? 2. Was this something you would try to make at home? 3. Did anything go wrong with the recipe? If so, what? 4. What would you do differently if you were going to prepare this recipe again? 5. Were there any substitutions or changes that you would make to the recipe? Activity 4.5 Webquest—Salad Anyone? Instructor Setup Review the chapter with the students, and explain that they will be going on a Webquest. A Webquest is a journey on the Web, designed to provide specific information about a product or topic. This Webquest will focus on salads. 30
  44. 44. Chapter 4 | Salads and Garnishing Optional Activity 1 After students have completed the Webquest, ask them to find an additional Web site that adds to the class knowledge base about salads. Students could find a site with a video on salad preparation, a Web site about different types of lettuce, or some type of teaching activity. Have students share the site with the class, and explain why they selected the site. If desired, the students could also post to a class Wiki or to a delicious.com account (online bookmarking site) for future reference. Optional Activity 2 Have each student create a single PowerPoint slide highlighting an interesting fact about lettuce, salad, or salad preparation. Students should be encouraged to use creativity while maintaining accuracy. The slides can then be put together in a class slide show and students could vote on the most creative, most interesting, most useful, etc. Lettuce 1. leaf; cos (or romaine); crisphead; butterhead; and stem (or asparagus) 2. vitamin C; calcium; iron; and copper Food Facts 1. They believed that lettuce induced sleep. 
 2. 70% 3. The Waldorf salad was created at the Waldorf Astoria Hotel in 1896 by Oscar Tschirky. The original Waldorf salad only contained apples, celery, and mayonnaise. Gelatin Salads 1. The 1930s. 2. Answers will vary. Activity 4.6 Lab—Dressings and Dips Instructor Setup Review and follow instructions found in the Lab Activities section at the front of the book. Review basic food-preparation concepts from Chapter 4: Salads and Garnishes. Select a recipe for the class to prepare. Review the recipe, and read the lab introduction to the class. Optional Activity Create a chart listing each type of dressing with columns for taste, texture, mouth feel, rating, heavy or light, and serving suggestions. Ask students to fill in the chart after tasting each dressing. Prior to rating the items, lead the students in a discussion to set criteria for each category. 31
  45. 45. Chapter 4 | Salads and Garnishing Instructor Debrief After the students have completed the lab, lead them in a discussion about the following: 1. What did you like about the recipe? 2. Was this something you would try to make at home? 3. Did anything go wrong with the recipe? If so, what? 4. What would you do differently if you were going to prepare this recipe again? 5. Were there any substitutions or changes that you would make to the recipe? Activity 4.7 Comparing Fresh and Premade Dips and Dressings Instructor Setup Review the nutritional information studied in Chapter 2 with the class, and ask students to brainstorm the differences that they have noticed in items made from scratch as compared to store-bought items. Have students work in teams to conduct a nutritional and taste comparison of fresh dips and sauces and store-bought dips and sauces. This activity can be done in conjunction with Activity 4.6, or save portions of the dips/dressings to be used in this activity. Supplies Required Freshly Prepared + Recipes Guacamole Hummus Casear Dressing Roquefort (Blue Cheese) dressing Store Bought + Nutritional Breakdown Guacamole Hummus Caesar Dressing Roquefort (Blue Cheese) dressing Optional Activity 1 Collect a variety of labels for variations on these items, such as low-fat, regular, and flavored. Have students compare and contrast the nutritional values and also the difference in taste, texture, mouth appeal, etc. Optional Activity 2 Have students calculate the cost of one (or more) of the recipes, and compare it to the cost of the premade item. Ask students to conduct a make-or-buy analysis and determine whether they would make the dip/dressing fresh or purchase it if they needed to serve 100 portions per day. Have students explain the rationale for their decision. Instructor Debrief Have students share their presentations with the class, and then lead the class in a discussion about the following: 1. Was there a noticeable difference in taste between the fresh item and the premade item? 2. Was there a noticeable cost difference between the fresh item and the premade item? If so, which was least expensive? 3. If price were no object, as a chef, which item would you choose to serve in your restaurant? Why? 32
  46. 46. Chapter 4 | Salads and Garnishing Activity 4.8 Lab—Advanced Garnishes Instructor Setup Review and follow instructions found in the Lab Activities section at the front of the book. Review basic garnish techniques, and then explain to the students that they will be learning additional garnishes for desserts, soups, and salads. Supplies Required ■■ Thin-bladed knife (paring knife) ■■ Cutting board ■■ Scallions ■■ Cucumbers ■■ Small sweet pickles ■■ Grapes ■■ Sugar Instructor Debrief After students have had an opportunity to practice these garnishes, lead the class in a discussion about the following: 1. Why is it important for a chef to know a wide variety of garnishes? 2. When planning a dish, what role does the garnish play? 3. When determining food costs, is it necessary to include the cost of the garnish in the cost of the dish? Why or why not? 4. What other types of edible garnishes could you make using readily available produce? Activity 4.9 Lab—Chocolate Dessert Garnishes Instructor Setup Review the section on dessert garnishes with the class. Explain that they will be working with chocolate to create several garnishes that can be used to enhance a variety of desserts. Before beginning the chocolate work, have the students brainstorm other garnishes that can be used to garnish desserts when chocolate is not appropriate. Lead students in a discussion about the importance of tempering chocolate and why chocolate must be tempered if using non-candy coating for chocolate work. If time permits, demonstrate the tempering process to students; otherwise, use candy coating for the activities. 33
  47. 47. Chapter 4 | Salads and Garnishing Supplies Required ■■ Block of semisweet chocolate ■■ Grater or microplane ■■ Paring knife ■■ White baking chocolate/candy coating ■■ Tempered chocolate/candy coating ■■ Piping bag ■■ Waxed paper ■■ Baking sheet ■■ Offset spatula ■■ Pastry bag ■■ Writing tip Note: If working with chocolate instead of candy coating, the chocolate will need to be tempered before using it in the activities. Instructor Debrief After the students have completed their work with the chocolate, lead them in a discussion about the following: 1. What was the most challenging part of working with chocolate? 2. How difficult (or easy) was it to pipe the chocolate designs? 3. What other ways could you use chocolate for dessert garnishes? Activity 4.10 Research—Edible Flowers Instructor Setup Have students brainstorm a list of unusual garnishes that can be used with soups, desserts, and entrées. Then, explain that edible flowers can be used as decorative garnishes. Have students research a variety of edible flowers and create a chart that can be displayed listing the type of flower and how it may be used to garnish a dish. Additional Activity If budget permits, bring in two or three different types of edible flowers for students to taste. Instructor Debrief After students have completed the chart and made their presentations, lead them in a discussion about the following: 1. Prior to this activity, did you know that edible flowers were available and used in restaurants? 2. What was the most interesting thing you learned about edible flowers? 3. If you had an opportunity, would you try a flower? 34
  48. 48. Chapter 5 | Purchasing and Inventory Chapter 5 Activity 5.1 Test Your Knowledge of Purchasing and Inventory IQ Instructor Setup Before beginning the chapter, have students complete the “Test Your Knowledge of Purchasing and Inventory IQ” test. Part 1—Introduction to Purchasing T _ 1. F _ 2. The first goal of purchasing is to make sure that the operation has enough of the correct product to sell. T _ 3. T _ 4. F _ 5. Bids are specialized, written price lists created by the supplier for the restaurant and are used to ensure accuracy and minimize miscommunications. T _ 6. Part 2—Making Purchasing Decisions T _ 1. F _ 2. A product specification is written by the operation to describe the standards required by the operation to meet their quality needs. T _ 3. F _ 4. A production sheet is used by the chef to list all the menu items that will be needed for service on a particular day. T _ 5. T _ 6. F _ 7. There are many economic factors that influence the price of an item, including time, form, and service. (Answers may vary.) 35
  49. 49. Chapter 5 | Purchasing and Inventory Part 3—Managing Purchases F _ 1. The receiving process includes three critical elements: inspecting, accepting, and, in some cases, rejecting deliveries. T _ 2. T _ 3. F _ 4. When storing perishable items in the cooler, raw meats should be kept separate from ready-to-eat foods and should be organized properly. T _ 5. F _ 6. Inventory shrinkage refers to the difference between inventory value and the total cost of goods issued. Instructor Debrief Review the correct answers with the students. Once you have completed Chapter 5, ask the students to complete the activity again. Then, ask them the following questions: 1. How have their scores improved? 2. What were three things they learned in the chapter that surprised them? 3. After reading the chapter, what part of the purchasing process struck them as being the most difficult to control? Why? 36
  50. 50. Chapter 5 | Purchasing and Inventory Activity 5.2 Crossword Puzzle—Purchasing Instructor Setup Have students review the material in Chapter 5. After reviewing the material, have them prepare to complete the crossword puzzle by filling in the statements. Instructor Debrief Review the answers with the students, and discuss any outstanding questions. Activity 5.3 Career Exploration—The Buyer Instructor Setup The role of the buyer is unique within many hospitality operations and requires several skills, including product knowledge, the ability to negotiate, excellent communication skills, and the ability to stay current with trends in the industry. Have students brainstorm a list of skills and possible companies within the hospitality industry that might hire a full-time buyer. Then, have students research the role of the buyer. Additional Activity Invite the buyer (chef, owner, manager) from a local operation to discuss the challenges of being a buyer and to share insight into the buying process. 37
  51. 51. Chapter 5 | Purchasing and Inventory Instructor Debrief After the students have completed the research and submitted their papers, lead the class in a discussion by asking the following questions: 1. Would you rather be the owner of a small operation responsible for all aspects from buying to menu creation, or would you rather work for a large operation that allows you to focus on just one element of the buying process? 2. What do you think would be the most stressful part of being a buyer? 3. What do you think would be the most exciting part of being a buyer? 4. What ethical issues do you think a buyer might face? Activity 5.4 Product Specifications Instructor Setup Review the importance of quality standards in the operation, and discuss the different items that might be included on a product-specification sheet. Explain to students that they can get detailed information about many products used in the restaurant operation from many Web sites, including the following: ■■ U.S. Department of Agriculture: www.usda.gov ■■ The Produce Guide: www.theproduceguide.com ■■ Seafood Selector from the Environmental Defense Fund: www.edf.org/page.cfm?tagID=1521 ■■ What to Look for When Buying Meat: www.askthemeatman.com/what_to_look_for_when_buying_beef_10300.htm To assist the students in this activity, you may choose to assign the students the same type of restaurant, i.e., quick-service restaurant or family-style restaurant, or you may assign students a different type of restaurant so you can compare the different types of specs the students might write. Types of restaurant options: ■■ Quick-service ■■ ■■ Casual ■■ Steak house ■■ 38 Family-style Fine dining
  52. 52. Chapter 5 | Purchasing and Inventory Instructor Debrief After students have completed their product specifications, lead the class in a discussion about the following: 1. Did everyone in the class have the same product spec? If not, why? 2. How did you determine the quality and types of products to order for this activity? 3. Would it have been useful to know the type of restaurant you were creating the product specs for before beginning the activity? Why? Activity 5.5 Lab—Make-or-Buy Analysis Instructor Setup This is not a traditional lab, as the students will only be making one item. In addition to preparing cookies, they will also conduct a cost analysis and use that to determine which is the more cost-effective method—making oatmeal raisin cookies or purchasing them. Before beginning the activity, have students brainstorm all the costs involved in baking cookies. (Be sure to address not only food costs, but labor costs and equipment.) Additional Activity In addition to preparing the cookies, bring in samples of similar cookies from a bakery and/or premade cookies. Cut the cookies into fourths, and have students do a taste comparison. Instructor Debrief After students have completed the process of baking cookies and gathering data, lead them in a discussion about the process. 1. Based on your data, which do you think the manager of Easy Street Café should do: make or buy the cookies? 2. How did you reach your conclusion? 3. Should cost be the only factor to consider when conducting a make-or-buy analysis? If no, what else should be considered? 4. As a customer, would you prefer a made-from-scratch cookie or a premade cookie from a vendor? Does it matter? Activity 5.6 Practice Purchase Order Instructor Setup Have students complete the sample purchase order by calculating the correct prices. 39
  53. 53. Chapter 5 | Purchasing and Inventory Additional Activity Create a spreadsheet using Excel or a similar program, and have students practice writing formulas and calculating correct prices. Purchase Order Item 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 Description Canned peas California carrots, U.S. Extra Fancy, No. 1 Cod fillets, boneless, no skin Cheddar cheese, Wisconsin aged Tomato juice Olives, ripe Fresh cabbage Washington apples, fresh Rome Beauty Red tomatoes, U.S. No. 1 Hamburger, IMPS No. 136 Eggs, fresh, in shell, U.S. AA Garlic powder Kosher dill pickles Fresh-frozen crab meat Green onions Shrimp, headless, frozen, in shell (21–30) Quantity 6 cases 6 cases 40 lb 2 cases 3 cases 4 qt 5 cases 2 cases 2 cases 150 lb 2 cases 2 cans 2 gal 45 lb 20 bunches 18 packages Unit Cost $11.75/case $ 7.87/case $2.35/lb $1.35/lb $8.98/case $12.55/qt $13.75/case $19.65/case $5.85/case $1.64/lb $0.98/doz $0.76/can $9.67/gal $27.50/lb $0.34/bunch $25.00/lb Sub-total Tax (9.25%) Delivery Total Extension $ 70.50 $47.22 $94.00 (8 lb/case) $21.60 $26.94 $50.20 $68.75 $39.30 $11.70 $246.00 15 doz/case $29.40 $1.52 $19.34 $1,237.50 $6.80 (5 lb/package) $2,250.00 $4220.77 $390.42 $75.00 $4,686.19 Instructor Debrief Review the correct answers with the students. Then, lead the class in a discussion about the following: 1. Which items were most confusing to calculate? Why? 2. Why do only some items list quality grades? Activity 5.7 Put Your Order In Order Instructor Setup Have students complete the activity following the directions. Part 1 1. You should bring the error to the attention of the delivery driver. Then, prepare a request for credit memo, and have it signed by the driver. This will provide the information needed to ensure your account is credited for the overcharge. 40
  54. 54. Chapter 5 | Purchasing and Inventory 2. The two most common methods are physical inventory (sometimes called periodic inventory) and perpetual inventory. In the physical-inventory method, the entire stock is physically reviewed on a regular basis. From this review, the operation determines the reorder point for each inventory item. In the perpetualinventory method, employees record items when they are received and record when they are used. Both methods tell how much stock is on hand. Both methods have a paper trail. Differences include actually counting of items in the physical inventory at a set time as compared to recording items every day in the perpetual inventory. (Answer may vary.) 3. Issuing is when employees remove items from the storeroom following proper approval and recordkeeping procedures. Pilfering is the illegal removal (stealing) of inventory items. Part 2 Order Item 7. A 5. B 8. C 6. D 4. E 1. F 9. G 3. H 2. I Instructor Debrief Review the correct answers with the students. Discuss any outstanding questions related to the purchasing process, and then lead the class in a discussion about the following: 1. Are there any steps in the purchasing process that seem unnecessary to you? If yes, why? 2. What steps do you think are most important? Why? 3. How are any of these steps similar to how you shop for something for yourself? Activity 5.8 Poster—Preventing Spoilage and Cross-Contamination Instructor Setup Review the proper procedures for storing food in the cooler with the class, referring to section 5.3 in the textbook as needed. Then, lead the class in a brainstorming session regarding the potential problems that may arise from improper storage. Have the students share their posters with the class, and as a group determine the best poster. 41
  55. 55. Chapter 5 | Purchasing and Inventory Instructor Debrief After the students have shared their posters, lead them in a discussion about the following: 1. How important is proper storage of food in the refrigerator? 2. What are some potential problems that can arise from improper storage of food? 3. If you were to go home and review your refrigerator, would you find items properly stored or not? If not, what is the biggest challenge to maintaining good storage practices? Activity 5.9 Calculating the Cost of Purchasing Instructor Setup Review the process for calculating food costs with the students. If necessary, refer to Section 5.3 in the text. Have students complete the worksheet. Part 1 Date 9/1 9/7 9/14 9/21 9/28 10/1 (9/1–9/30) Action Opening inventory: Delivery (cost of goods received) Delivery (cost of goods received) Delivery (cost of goods received) Delivery (cost of goods received) Total Ending inventory Total cost of food Amount $45,271.00 +$5,567.00 +$12,059.00 +$10,456.00 +4,523.00 $77,876.00 $32,678.00 $45,198.00 Part 2 1. 30.1% 2. 25.82% 3. $150,000.00 - $45,198.00 = $104,802.00 Gross profit (profit before other costs) Instructor Debrief Review the correct answers with the students, and answer any questions they might have regarding the process of calculating food costs. Then, lead the class in a discussion about the following: 1. Is it possible for a restaurant to have food costs that are too low? If yes, what does that do to the quality of the food? 2. Do you think the type of restaurant (i.e., quick service, fine dining) makes a difference on the food cost percentage? Why? 42
  56. 56. Chapter 5 | Purchasing and Inventory Activity 5.10 Receiving Guidelines Instructor Setup Review the section on receiving with the students, and then explain that they will be writing receiving guidelines for a new restaurant. Instructor Debrief After the students have completed this task, lead them in a discussion about the following: 1. Why is it important to have posted practices for receiving? 2. What are some possible problems that can occur if proper receiving practices are not followed? 3. How important is it to have an exact record of all deliveries? If these figures are not correct, what are some potential problems that can occur later in the operating month? 43
  57. 57. Chapter 6 | Meat, Poultry, and Seafood Chapter 6 Activity 6.1 Test Your Meat, Poultry, and Seafood IQ Instructor Setup Before beginning the chapter, have students complete the “Test Your Meat, Poultry, and Seafood IQ” test. Part 1—Meat T _ 1. F _ 2. There are several USDA grades for meat, and those labeled Prime are the best possible grade. T _ 3. F _ 4. Offal meat is not used as often in the United States. It includes organ meat, such as sweetbreads, liver, kidney, and tripe. T _ 5. F _ 6. When receiving meat deliveries, meat that is brown or green in color should be rejected. T _ 7. T _ 8. Part 2—Poultry F _ 1. The USDA is responsible for grading poultry, and grades of A, B, or C are given based on a number of guidelines, including shape, defects, and form. T _ 2. T _ 3. F _ 4. Poultry that has purple or green around the neck should be rejected for not being fresh. T _ 5. F _ 6. Poultry should be cooked to an internal temperature of 165°F to kill all traces of Salmonella spp. 44
  58. 58. Chapter 6 | Meat, Poultry, and Seafood Part 3—Seafood T _ 1. F _ 2. The two main categories of fish are fin fish (any fish with a backbone) and shellfish (any fish with an outer shell). T _ 3. T _ 4. F _ 5. Shellfish must have shellstock identification tags, and these must be kept for at least 90 days from the date the last item delivered was served. F _ 6. The best way to cook fin fish is to pair the fish with a cooking technique that works best with the flesh type of the fish—pair an oily fish with dry heat and poach a lean fish. Part 4—Charcuterie and Garde Manger F _ 1. Charcuterie is a French term that means “cooked flesh.” It refers to sausages and other prepared pork products. T _ 2. T _ 3. F _ 4. Mousseline is made from veal, poultry, or fish. Instructor Debrief Review the correct answers with the students. Once you have completed Chapter 6, ask the students to complete the activity again. Then, ask them the following questions: 1. How have their scores improved? 2. What are three things they learned in the chapter that surprised them? 3. After reading the chapter, are they going to try any new food items? Activity 6.2 Editorial—The Importance of Meat for Good Nutrition Instructor Setup Review several editorials and letters to the editor from local and national newspapers. Students may bring in print articles or find them from a variety of online news sources. Have students review different writing styles, 45
  59. 59. Chapter 6 | Meat, Poultry, and Seafood and lead the class in a discussion about persuasive writing. Then, ask the students to write a letter to the editor addressing one of the following topics: ■■ The role that beef (or other meats) play in a healthy diet ■■ The benefits and risks of eating meat ■■ How to properly store and handle meat ■■ The importance of limiting (or increasing) the use of organic beef ■■ Vegetarian diets Instructor Debrief Have students share their editorials with their classmates. If there is a student newspaper or local newspaper, encourage students to submit their article for publication. After reading the editorials, lead the students in a discussion about the following: 1. What was the most challenging part of writing the editorial? 2. Why is it important to share this type of information with the general public? 3. What did you learn about healthy eating while researching information for your editorial? 4. Do you think that this type of writing can persuade people to change their habits? Activity 6.3 Lab—Cooking with Beef Instructor Setup Review and follow instructions found in the Lab Activities section at the front of the book. Review basic food preparation concepts from Section 6.1, “Meat.” Select a meat recipe for the class to prepare. Review the recipe, and read the lab introduction to the class. Instructor Debrief After the students have completed the lab, lead them in a discussion about the following: 1. What did you like about the recipe? 2. Was this something you would try to make at home? 3. Did anything go wrong with the recipe? If so, what? 4. What would you do differently if you were going to prepare this recipe again? 5. Were there any substitutions or changes that you would make to the recipe? 46
  60. 60. Chapter 6 | Meat, Poultry, and Seafood Activity 6.4 Match the Cut to the Best Cooking Technique Instructor Setup Review the three methods of cooking meat with the students from Section 6.1, “Meat,” in their textbook. Lead them in a discussion about how choosing the proper cooking method for the meat can bring out the full flavor and enhance the dining experience. Beef 2. Rib Roast 2. Tenderloin 1. Flank Steak 3. Brisket Veal 4. Rib 4. Veal Shank 1. Veal Loin Chop 2. Kidney Pork 4. Boston Butt 3. Ham 5. Bacon 4. Spareribs Instructor Debrief Answers may vary depending on the students’ experiences with cooking; however, they should be close. After students have shared their answers, lead the class in a discussion about the following: 1. Is there just one “right” method for cooking different types of meat? 2. Why do some cuts of meat lend themselves to certain cooking methods better than others? 3. What happens if the chef chooses the wrong cooking method for a piece of meat? Activity 6.5 Lab—How to Cut Chicken 8 Ways Instructor Setup Review the section on poultry from the text, and then lead the class in a discussion about fabricating chicken for preparation. Ask students to brainstorm different uses for the four main parts of the chicken (post-fabrication: legs, thighs, breasts, and wings). 47
  61. 61. Chapter 6 | Meat, Poultry, and Seafood Additional Activity After the students have completed breaking down the chicken, introduce them to different concepts for cooking each part of the chicken. Instructor Debrief After the students have completed breaking down their chicken and cleaning their station, lead them in a discussion about the following: 1. Prior to this activity, have you ever broken down a chicken for cooking? If yes, did you use the same procedure or a different method? 2. Why is it important to know how to break down a chicken into its essential parts? 3. What could a chef do with the remaining chicken parts? Why is it important to use as much of the chicken as possible? Activity 6.6 Lab—Cooking with Poultry Instructor Setup Review and follow instructions found in the Lab Activities section at the front of the book. Review basic food-preparation concepts from Chapter 6: Meat, Poultry, and Seafood. Select a poultry recipe for the class to prepare. Review the recipe, and read the lab introduction to the class. Instructor Debrief After the students have completed the lab, lead them in a discussion about the following: 1. What did you like about the recipe? 2. Was this something you would try to make at home? 3. Did anything go wrong with the recipe? If so, what? 4. What would you do differently if you were going to prepare this recipe again? 5. Were there any substitutions or changes that you would make to the recipe? Activity 6.7 Research—Sushi Instructor Setup Sushi is gaining in popularity, and sushi bars are no longer just found in Japanese restaurants. Instead, many popular grocery chains also offer fresh sushi as an option for their customers. Lead students in a discussion about sushi, and have students brainstorm different types of sushi and/or sashimi they have heard of or eaten. The following sites will provide more information for students who may not be familiar with sushi: ■■ EatSushi: www.eatsushi.com 48
  62. 62. Chapter 6 | Meat, Poultry, and Seafood ■■ Types of sushi and sashimi: www.thenibble.com/reviews/main/fish/seafood/sushi-glossary.asp ■■ Sushi secrets: www.sushisecrets.com/learnsushi.html Additional Activity Purchase some sushi kits and the appropriate ingredients, and have students make their own sushi. Consider inviting a local sushi chef to class to demonstrate how to make sushi, and discuss some of the special skills needed by a sushi chef. Instructor Debrief After the students have completed their research and presented their ads, lead them in a discussion about the following: 1. What is the difference between sushi and sashimi? 2. Prior to this activity, how familiar were you with sushi and sashimi? If you have eaten either before, what is your favorite? 3. During your research, what were two interesting things you learned? 4. After conducting your research, would you be tempted to try making sushi on your own? Activity 6.8 Lab—Cooking with Seafood Instructor Setup Review and follow instructions found in the Lab Activities section at the front of the book. Review basic food-preparation concepts from Chapter 6: Meat, Poultry, and Seafood. Select a seafood recipe for the class to prepare. Review the recipe, and read the lab introduction to the class. Instructor Debrief After the students have completed the lab, lead them in a discussion about the following: 1. What did you like about the recipe? 2. Was this something you would try to make at home? 3. Did anything go wrong with the recipe? If so, what? 4. What would you do differently if you were going to prepare this recipe again? 5. Were there any substitutions or changes that you would make to the recipe? 49
  63. 63. Chapter 6 | Meat, Poultry, and Seafood Activity 6.9 Presentation—Sustainable Seafood Instructor Setup Begin the discussion by asking students if they know what sustainable agriculture means. If not, explain the concept of sustainability, and discuss the importance of renewing resources in order to continue meeting the needs of consumers. Additional information regarding sustainable seafood can be found at these sites (students should be encouraged to explore the sites to learn more): ■■ Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch: www.montereybayaquarium.org/cr/seafoodwatch.aspx ■■ NOAA Fisheries: www.oar.noaa.gov/k12/html/fisheries2.html Note: Additional activities and discussion regarding sustainability are introduced in Chapter 9. Instructor Debrief After the students have completed their presentations, lead them in a discussion about the following: 1. What was the most surprising fact you learned about the seafood served today? 2. What steps can a chef take to help create awareness about depleting natural resources? 3. What were two unusual items you learned about the fish you selected? Activity 6.10 Menu Design—Sausages around the World Instructor Setup Lead students in a discussion about the different types of sausages that might be encountered in the kitchen and the role of the charcuterie. Have students brainstorm a list of sausages from around the world. Then, have students work in teams of two to four to create an international sausage buffet. Instructor Debrief After the students have submitted their assignments, lead the class in a discussion about the following: 1. What, if anything, did the countries you selected for your sausage menus have in common? 2. What was the most unusual type of sausage you discovered while planning the menu? 3. Which sausage would you be least likely to try? Why? Most likely? Why? 50
  64. 64. Chapter 7 | Marketing Chapter 7 Activity 7.1 Test Your Knowledge of Marketing IQ Instructor Setup Before beginning the chapter, have students complete the “Test Your Knowledge of Marketing IQ” test. Part 1—Introduction to Marketing T _ 1. T _ 2. F _ 3. The marketing mix refers to the combination of marketing activities that go together to create, develop, and sell a product. T _ 4. F _ 5. A SWOT analysis is a way that management can understand its current position and take advantage of marketing opportunities. T _ 6. Part 2—Market Analysis, Identity, and Communication T _ 1. F _ 2. The sampling method of marketing research uses focus groups, or small groups of people, to test a specific product or service. T _ 3. T _ 4. F _ 5. Positioning, in terms of marketing, refers to how an operation sets itself apart from the competition. T _ 6. Part 3—The Menu as Marketing Tool T _ 1. F _ 2. An à la carte menu offers all items individually priced, while a prix fixe menu offers multiple items for one price. T _ 3. 51
  65. 65. Chapter 7 | Marketing T _ 4. T _ 5. F _ 6. Items designated as “plow horse” are popular but may not be profitable, so removing these items should be done with caution. Instructor Debrief Review the correct answers with the students. Once you have completed Chapter 7, ask the students to complete the activity again. Then, ask them the following questions: 1. How have their scores improved? 2. What were three things they learned in the chapter that surprised them? 3. After reading the chapter, will they look at menus in a different perspective? 52
  66. 66. Chapter 7 | Marketing Activity 7.2 Crossword Puzzle—Marketing Instructor Setup Have students review the material in Chapter: 7 Marketing. After reviewing the material, have them prepare to complete the crossword puzzle by completing the statements. Instructor Debrief Review the answers with students and discuss any outstanding questions. Activity 7.3 Creating a Marketing Plan Instructor Setup The students will be using the hypothetical Easy Street Café for most of the activities in this chapter. The Easy Street Café is a 100-seat casual-dining establishment serving burgers and sandwiches, but is known throughout the area for its homemade desserts. The students will be applying the marketing concepts from this chapter to the café. 53
  67. 67. Chapter 7 | Marketing Begin by asking students about the difference between advertising and marketing. Have them brainstorm some advertising ideas and then some marketing ideas. Topics may include special promotions, public-relations activities, advertising, and surveying customers. Discuss the elements of a marketing plan with the students. Have students work in teams of two to four. Instructor Debrief After the students have shared their marketing plans with the class, lead them in a discussion about the following: 1. Can a restaurant be successful without a formal marketing plan? 2. What are the benefits of having a marketing plan? 3. How will a restaurant know if their marketing plan has been a success? Activity 7.4 Research Customer Habits Instructor Setup Review Section 7.2 in the text on the four methods of conducting market research, and then have the students brainstorm ways to gather information from customers about a new menu item a restaurant plans to introduce in the future. Ask them to brainstorm ideas for how to research customer feelings about a total change in concept for a restaurant, for example, changing from a steak house to a seafood restaurant. Instructor Debrief After the students have completed their surveys and discussed how to use a focus group, ask for volunteers to share their surveys with the class. Then, lead them in a discussion about the following: 1. Why is it important to collect customer feedback regarding new menu items or changes to the restaurant? 2. How can a manager/owner be sure that customers are providing honest feedback? 3. What are some methods that can be used to encourage customers to return their surveys? 4. Find examples of surveys used at local restaurants or online, and discuss what characteristics make a good survey. Activity 7.5 Design a Sales Promotion for Easy Street Café Instructor Setup Review the different methods of communicating with guests about sales and opportunities within the restaurant. Lead the students in a discussion about the difference between advertising and sales promotions, and then have the class brainstorm a list of sales promotions that have been used effectively in the community. 54
  68. 68. Chapter 7 | Marketing Instructor Debrief Have students share their promotional materials with the class, and have them explain how they chose their promotional method. After the students have shared their promotion, lead the class in a discussion about the following: 1. How has the art of creating promotions changed with changing technologies? 2. Is a sales promotion designed for a social networking site different than a traditional print campaign? 3. Why would a restaurant want to create a variety of sales promotions? How can they track the effectiveness of these promotions? Activity 7.6 Classroom Media Group, Inc. Instructor Setup Divide students into teams. Following the directions, have each team develop one of the following for the Easy Street Café: ■■ Newspaper advertisement ■■ 30-second radio commercial ■■ 30-second television commercial ■■ Web page Instructor Debrief As students present their final creations to the class, ask the class the following questions: 1. Who is the target market for the ad, commercial, or Web site? 2. What is the unique selling point for this restaurant? 3. How clear is the message of the ad (commercial, Web site)? How could it be improved? Invite actual restaurant managers to view and critique the ads/commercials/Web sites created by the class. Activity 7.7 Conducting a SWOT analysis Instructor Setup Review the SWOT analysis information with the class. Have them brainstorm examples for each of the four categories (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, threats) by using a local restaurant as an example. Explain to the students that there are several resources online that explain SWOT, and the following provide additional examples of SWOT analysis in action: ■■ Restaurant Doctor UK: www.restaurantdoctoruk.co.uk/SWOTanalysis.htm ■■ Pasta Restaurant Marketing Plan: www.mplans.com/pasta_restaurant_marketing_plan/situation_analysis_fc.php 55

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