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American History 3 (Chicgao)
American History 3 (Chicgao)
American History 3 (Chicgao)
American History 3 (Chicgao)
American History 3 (Chicgao)
American History 3 (Chicgao)
American History 3 (Chicgao)
American History 3 (Chicgao)
American History 3 (Chicgao)
American History 3 (Chicgao)
American History 3 (Chicgao)
American History 3 (Chicgao)
American History 3 (Chicgao)
American History 3 (Chicgao)
American History 3 (Chicgao)
American History 3 (Chicgao)
American History 3 (Chicgao)
American History 3 (Chicgao)
American History 3 (Chicgao)
American History 3 (Chicgao)
American History 3 (Chicgao)
American History 3 (Chicgao)
American History 3 (Chicgao)
American History 3 (Chicgao)
American History 3 (Chicgao)
American History 3 (Chicgao)
American History 3 (Chicgao)
American History 3 (Chicgao)
American History 3 (Chicgao)
American History 3 (Chicgao)
American History 3 (Chicgao)
American History 3 (Chicgao)
American History 3 (Chicgao)
American History 3 (Chicgao)
American History 3 (Chicgao)
American History 3 (Chicgao)
American History 3 (Chicgao)
American History 3 (Chicgao)
American History 3 (Chicgao)
American History 3 (Chicgao)
American History 3 (Chicgao)
American History 3 (Chicgao)
American History 3 (Chicgao)
American History 3 (Chicgao)
American History 3 (Chicgao)
American History 3 (Chicgao)
American History 3 (Chicgao)
American History 3 (Chicgao)
American History 3 (Chicgao)
American History 3 (Chicgao)
American History 3 (Chicgao)
American History 3 (Chicgao)
American History 3 (Chicgao)
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American History 3 (Chicgao)

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History 111 American

History 111 American

Published in: Health & Medicine
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  • 1. Reasons for EuropeanMigrations to the Americas in the 17c
  • 2. English ColonizationThe Charter of the Virginia Company:  Guaranteed to colonists the same rights as Englishmen as if they had stayed in England.  This provision was incorporated into future colonists’ documents.  Colonists felt that, even in the Americas, they had the rights of Englishmen!
  • 3. England Plants theJamestown “Seedling”Late 1606  VA Co. sends out 3 shipsSpring 1607  land at mouth ofChesapeake Bay.  Attacked by Indians and move on.May 24, 1607  about 100 colonists [allmen] land at Jamestown, along banks ofJames River  Easily defended, but swarming with disease-causing mosquitoes.
  • 4. Chesapeake BayGeographic/environmental problems??
  • 5. Jamestown Fort & Settlement Map
  • 6. Jamestown Fort & Settlement (Computer Generated)
  • 7. Jamestown Housing
  • 8. Jamestown Settlement
  • 9. Jamestown Chapel, 1611
  • 10. The Jamestown Nightmare 1606-1607  40 people died on the voyage to the New World. 1609  another ship from England lost its leaders and supplies in a shipwreck off Bermuda. Settlers died by the dozens! ―Gentlemen‖ colonists would not work themselves.  Game in forests & fish in river uncaught. Settlers wasted time looking for gold instead of hunting or farming.
  • 11. Captain John Smith: The Right Man for the Job??There was no talk…but dig gold, wash gold, refine gold, load gold…
  • 12. PocahontasPocahontas ―saves‖ A 1616Captain John Smith engraving
  • 13. English Migration: 1610-1660
  • 14. River Settlement PatternLarge plantations [>100 acres].Widely spread apart [>5 miles]. Social/Economic PROBLEMS???
  • 15. High Mortality RatesThe ―Starving Time‖: 1607: 104 colonists By spring, 1608: 38 survived 1609: 300 more immigrants By spring, 1610: 60 survived 1610 – 1624: 10,000 immigrants 1624 population: 1,200 Adult life expectancy: 40 years Death of children before age 5: 80%
  • 16. Chief PowhatanPowhatan Confederacy  Powhatan dominated a few dozen small tribes in the James River area when the English arrived.  The English called all Indians in the area Powhatans.  Powhatan probably saw the English as allies in his struggles to control other Indian tribes in the region.
  • 17. Culture Clash in the ChesapeakeRelations between Indians & settlersgrew worse.  General mistrust because of different cultures & languages.  English raided Indian food supplies during the starving times.1610-1614  First Anglo-Powhatan War  De La Warr had orders to make war on the Indians.  Raided villages, burned houses, took supplies, burned cornfields.
  • 18. Powhatan Uprising of 1622
  • 19. John RolfeWhat finally made the colony prosperous??
  • 20. Tobacco PlantVirginia’s gold and silver. -- John Rolfe, 1612
  • 21. Early Colonial Tobacco1618 — Virginia produces 20,000 pounds of tobacco.1622 — Despite losing nearly one-third of its colonists in an Indian attack, Virginia produces 60,000 pounds of tobacco.1627 — Virginia produces 500,000 pounds of tobacco.1629 — Virginia produces 1,500,000 pounds of tobacco.
  • 22. Indentured ServitudeHeadright System Indentured Contract, 1746
  • 23. Indentured ServitudeHeadright System:  Each Virginian got 50 acres for each person whose passage they paid.Indenture Contract:  5-7 years.  Promised ―freedom dues‖ [land, £]  Forbidden to marry.  1610-1614: only 1 in 10 outlived their indentured contracts!
  • 24. Richard Frethorne’s 1623 LetterIn-Class Activity: 1. Describe the life of the indentured servant as presented in this letter. 2. What are some of the problems he and the other servants experienced? 3. What are their biggest fears? 4. What does a historian learn about life in the 17c Chesapeake colony?
  • 25. Why was 1619 a pivotal year for the Chesapeake settlement?
  • 26. VirginiaHouse of Burgesses
  • 27. Growing Political Power The House of Burgesses established in 1619 & began to assume the role of the House of Commons in England  Control over finances, militia, etc. By the end of the 17c, H of B was able to initiate legislation. A Council appointed by royal governor  Mainly leading planters.  Functions like House of Lords.  High death rates ensured rapid turnover of members.
  • 28. Virginia Becomes a Royal Colony James I grew hostile to Virginia  He hated tobacco.  He distrusted the House of Burgesses which he called a seminary of sedition. 1624  he revoked the charter of the bankrupt VA Company.  Thus, VA became a royal colony, under the king’s direct control!
  • 29. English Tobacco Label First Africans arrived in Jamestown in 1619.  Their status was not clear  perhaps slaves, perhaps indentured servants.  Slavery not that important until the end of the 17c.
  • 30. 17c Population in the Chesapeake100000 80000 60000 White 40000 Black 20000 0 1607 1630 1650 1670 1690 WHY this large increase in black popul.??
  • 31. The Atlantic Slave Trade
  • 32. Goods Traded with Africa
  • 33. The “Middle Passage”
  • 34. Colonial SlaveryAs the number of slavesincreased, white colonists reacted toput down perceived racial threat.  Slavery transformed from economic to economic and racial institution.  Early 1600s  differences between slave and servant were unclear.By the mid-1680s, black slavesoutnumbered white indenturedservants.
  • 35. Colonial SlaveryBeginning in 1662  ―Slave Codes‖  Made blacks [and their children] property, or chattel for life of white masters.  In some colonies, it was a crime to teach a slave to read or write.  Conversion to Christianity did not qualify the slave for freedom.
  • 36. Frustrated FreemenLate 1600s  large numbers ofyoung, poor, discontented men in theChesapeake area.  Little access to land or women for marriage.1670  The Virginia Assemblydisenfranchised most landless men!
  • 37. Nathaniel Bacon’s Rebellion: 1676 Led 1,000 Virginians in a rebellion against Governor Berkeley  Rebels resented Berkeley’s close relations with Indians.Nathaniel Bacon  Berkeley monopolized the fur trade with the Indians in the area. Governor  Berkley refused to William retaliate for Indian Berkeley attacks on frontier settlements.
  • 38. Bacon’s RebellionRebels attacked Indians, whetherthey were friendly or not to whites.Governor Berkeley driven fromJamestown.They burned the capital.  Rebels went on a rampage of plundering.Bacon suddenly died of fever.Berkeley brutally crushed the rebellionand hanged 20 rebels.
  • 39. Results of Bacon’s RebellionIt exposed resentments betweeninland frontiersmen and landlessformer servants against gentry oncoastal plantations.  Socio-economic class differences/clashes between rural and urban communities would continue throughout American history.Upper class planters searched forlaborers less likely to rebel  BLACKSLAVES!!
  • 40. Bacon’s Rebellion• Black slaves, white indentured servants unite against elite – Bacon dies before rebellion can occur• Elite realize danger of freed, white indentured servants – Planters switch to enslaved black labor force• Whites freedom, prosperity rest on denying blacks freedom• Master class – Slaveholders
  • 41. England’s American Empire Takes Shape: Monarchy Restored and Navigation Controlled• The 1660 Navigation Act shaped British colonial commerce for generations: – Trade could not be conducted to or from English colonies in foreign-owned ships. – Foreign products (salt, wine, oil) could be transported only in English ships or ships with mainly English crews. – “Enumerated articles” could not be shipped directly from colonies to a foreign land – had to go to England first (included tobacco and cotton)
  • 42. England’s American Empire Takes Shape: Monarchy Restored and Navigation Controlled• Other measures, such as the Navigation Act of 1663 and the Plantation Duty Act of 1673, further tightened England’s control over colonial trade .• English customs officers sent to the colonies to oversee trade activity and enforce rules• Profits from English North America great - allowed for the reconstruction of London into a most “fashionable” city after devastating 1666 fire
  • 43. England’s American Empire Takes Shape: Dutch New Netherland Becomes New York• English Navigation Acts negatively impacted Dutch trade activity, sparked series of conflicts known as Anglo-Dutch Wars• Peace of Westminster in 1674 awarded England gains in Africa and America• One lasting consequence was English access to slave trade of Africa – reshaped American colonies at enormous cost in human life
  • 44. Salem’s Wartime Witch Hunt• Occurred in Essex County, Massachusetts in 1692• Europe experienced wide-spread witch hunt, but only number of isolated cases in New England in 1600s• Three-fourths of those accused (and even more of those executed) were women• Hallucinogenic actions and violent behaviors of young women in Salem Village raised fears of Satan.
  • 45. Salem’s Wartime Witch Hunt• False accusations and confessions abound• Hysteria ensued – convictions based on “spectral evidence” presented in court• 200 people accused and twenty put to death through public executions• Economic disparities between accusers and accused• No central authority in place to control situation

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