N.C. Center for Public Policy Research	<br />Public Policy Boot Camp<br />Mebane Rash and Sam Watts<br />April 14, 2011<br />
2011-12 Biennium of the N.C. General Assembly…The Basics<br /><ul><li>“Long” session started January 26, 2011.
“Short” session will start in May 2012:</li></ul>Bills that have passed one house, recs from a study commission, or relate...
During session, the legislators meet on Monday evening, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays.
120 members of the N.C. House.
50 members of the N.C. Senate.
All legislators serve 2 year terms.
No term limits.</li></li></ul><li>2011-12 Biennium of the N.C. General Assembly…The Basics<br /><ul><li>First time the Rep...
Priorities:</li></ul>	100 Day Agenda<br />	The Budget<br />	Redistricting<br /><ul><li>10-Year Election</li></li></ul><li>...
2011-12 Biennium of the N.C. General Assembly…The Basics<br /><ul><li>Fiscal Research Division
Research Division
Program Evaluation Division
Legislative Drafting Division</li></li></ul><li>2011-12 Biennium of the N.C. General Assembly…The Basics<br />Dates of Key...
2011-12 Biennium of the N.C. General Assembly…The Basics<br />
The Legislative Building<br />
The Legislative Office Building<br />
The House of Representatives:67 Republicans, 1 Unaffiliated, 52 Democrats<br />
Leadership of the House<br /><ul><li>Speaker:  Speaker Thom Tillis
Speaker Pro Tempore:  Rep. Dale R. Folwell
Majority Leader:  Rep. Paul Stam
Majority Whip:  Rep. Ruth Samuelson
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Public Policy Boot Camp Video

  1. 1. N.C. Center for Public Policy Research <br />Public Policy Boot Camp<br />Mebane Rash and Sam Watts<br />April 14, 2011<br />
  2. 2.
  3. 3. 2011-12 Biennium of the N.C. General Assembly…The Basics<br /><ul><li>“Long” session started January 26, 2011.
  4. 4. “Short” session will start in May 2012:</li></ul>Bills that have passed one house, recs from a study commission, or related to the budget.<br /><ul><li>This is a citizen, part-time legislature.
  5. 5. During session, the legislators meet on Monday evening, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays.
  6. 6. 120 members of the N.C. House.
  7. 7. 50 members of the N.C. Senate.
  8. 8. All legislators serve 2 year terms.
  9. 9. No term limits.</li></li></ul><li>2011-12 Biennium of the N.C. General Assembly…The Basics<br /><ul><li>First time the Republicans have controlled the legislature since 1870.
  10. 10. Priorities:</li></ul> 100 Day Agenda<br /> The Budget<br /> Redistricting<br /><ul><li>10-Year Election</li></li></ul><li>Republican Legislative Agenda<br />If the people of North Carolina entrust Republicans with a majority in the General Assembly on November 2, 2010, we commit to govern the State by focusing on these priorities:<br />1. Years of overspending by Democrats have given North Carolina the highest tax rates in the Southeast and a budget deficit of at least $3 billion; we will balance the State budget without raising tax rates.<br />2. High taxes are killing jobs. We will make our tax rates competitive with other states.<br />Within the first 100 legislative days you, Republicans will work to:<br />3. Pass The Healthcare Protection Act, exempting North Carolinians from the job-killing, liberty-restricting mandates of the federal Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (“Obama-Care”).<br />4. Fight to protect jobs by keeping our Right to Work laws intact.<br />5. Reduce the regulatory burden on small business.<br />6. Fund education in the classroom, not the bureaucracy.<br />7. Eliminate the cap on charter schools.<br />8. Pass the Honest Election Act, requiring a valid photo ID to vote.<br />9. Pass the Eminent Domain constitutional amendment to protect private property rights.<br />10. End pay-to-play politics and restore honesty and integrity to state government.<br />
  11. 11. 2011-12 Biennium of the N.C. General Assembly…The Basics<br /><ul><li>Fiscal Research Division
  12. 12. Research Division
  13. 13. Program Evaluation Division
  14. 14. Legislative Drafting Division</li></li></ul><li>2011-12 Biennium of the N.C. General Assembly…The Basics<br />Dates of Key Budget Votes:<br />April 22 House of Representatives<br />May 13 The Senate<br />June 1 Final Budget Votes<br />
  15. 15. 2011-12 Biennium of the N.C. General Assembly…The Basics<br />
  16. 16. The Legislative Building<br />
  17. 17. The Legislative Office Building<br />
  18. 18. The House of Representatives:67 Republicans, 1 Unaffiliated, 52 Democrats<br />
  19. 19. Leadership of the House<br /><ul><li>Speaker: Speaker Thom Tillis
  20. 20. Speaker Pro Tempore: Rep. Dale R. Folwell
  21. 21. Majority Leader: Rep. Paul Stam
  22. 22. Majority Whip: Rep. Ruth Samuelson
  23. 23. Deputy Majority Whips: </li></ul> Rep. Pat McElraft and Rep. Jonathan C. Jordan <br /><ul><li>Joint Caucus Leader: Rep. Marilyn Avila
  24. 24. Republican Freshman Leader: Rep. Mike Hager
  25. 25. Minority Leader: Rep. Joe Hackney
  26. 26. Deputy Minority Leader: Rep. William L. Wainwright
  27. 27. Minority Whips: Rep. Rick Glazier; Rep. Larry D. Hall; </li></ul> Rep. Ray Rapp; Rep. Deborah K. Ross; Rep. Michael H. Wray <br /><ul><li>Democratic Freshman Leader: Rep. Diane Parfitt</li></li></ul><li>Committees of the House<br /><ul><li>Agriculture
  28. 28. Appropriations
  29. 29. Banking
  30. 30. Commerce and Job Development
  31. 31. Education
  32. 32. Elections
  33. 33. Environment
  34. 34. Ethics
  35. 35. Finance
  36. 36. Government
  37. 37. Health and Human Services
  38. 38. Homeland Security, Military, and Veterans Affairs
  39. 39. Insurance
  40. 40. Judiciary
  41. 41. Public Utilities
  42. 42. Redistricting
  43. 43. Rules, Calendar, and Operations of the House
  44. 44. State Personnel
  45. 45. Transportation</li></li></ul><li>The Senate:31 Republicans, 19 Democrats<br />
  46. 46. Leadership of the Senate<br /><ul><li>President: Lt. Governor Walter Dalton
  47. 47. President Pro Tempore: Sen. Philip Berger
  48. 48. Deputy President Pro Tempore: </li></ul> Sen. James Forrester <br /><ul><li>Majority Leader: Sen. Harry Brown
  49. 49. Majority Whip: Sen. Jerry Tillman
  50. 50. Majority Caucus Secretary: Sen. Fletcher Hartsell
  51. 51. Caucus Liaison: Sen. Jean Preston
  52. 52. Democratic Leader: Sen. Martin Nesbitt, Jr.
  53. 53. Deputy Democratic Leader: Sen. Linda Garrou
  54. 54. Deputy Democratic Leader: Sen. Floyd McKissick
  55. 55. Deputy Democratic Leader: Sen. Don Vaughan
  56. 56. Democratic Whip: Sen. Josh Stein
  57. 57. Democratic Caucus Secretary: Sen. Eleanor Kinnaird
  58. 58. Democratic Caucus Chair: Sen. Charlie Dannelly</li></li></ul><li>Committees of the Senate<br /><ul><li>Agriculture / Environment / Natural Resources
  59. 59. Appropriations / Base Budget
  60. 60. Commerce
  61. 61. Committee of the Whole Senate
  62. 62. Education / Higher Education
  63. 63. Finance
  64. 64. Health Care
  65. 65. Insurance
  66. 66. Joint Regulatory Reform Committee
  67. 67. Judiciary I
  68. 68. Judiciary II
  69. 69. Mental Health & Youth Services
  70. 70. Pensions & Retirement and Aging
  71. 71. Program Evaluation
  72. 72. Redistricting
  73. 73. Rules and Operations of the Senate
  74. 74. State and Local Government
  75. 75. Transportation
  76. 76. Ways & Means</li></li></ul><li>Bill Deadlines<br />
  77. 77. Bill Deadlines<br />
  78. 78.
  79. 79. Veto Politics<br /><ul><li>Governor can sign bill, not sign it and it becomes law after 10 days, or veto it
  80. 80. Goes back to house of origin
  81. 81. Need 3/5 vote to override: </li></ul> 30 in Senate, 72 in Hosue<br /><ul><li>Senate has enough Republicans to override veto
  82. 82. House Republicans are short 4 votes</li></li></ul><li>13 Ways To Get Lucky in the Legislature<br /><ul><li>Be specific.
  83. 83. Do your homework.
  84. 84. Write it down.
  85. 85. Work at the committee level.
  86. 86. Take the legislators to see the problem.
  87. 87. Use your numbers.
  88. 88. Form an alliance or coalition.
  89. 89. Don’t ever threaten.
  90. 90. Visit the policymaker in person.
  91. 91. Meet with opposition/compromise.
  92. 92. Watch out for “we need to study this a little more.”
  93. 93. Be prepared for the 3 questions: what will it cost, has it been tried, will it work?
  94. 94. Thank the policymaker.</li></li></ul><li>For More Information:<br />Mebane Rash and Sam Watts<br />N.C. Center for Public Policy Research<br />5 West Hargett Street, Suite 701<br />PO Box 430 <br />Raleigh, NC 27602 Find us on:<br />(919) 832-2839 www.twitter.com/nccppr<br />mrash@nccppr.org www.facebook.com/nccppr<br />samwatts@nccppr.org www.youtube.com/nccppr<br />www.nccppr.org www.linkedin.com: nccppr<br />a 501 (c)(3) nonprofit organization <br />

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