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  • NOTE TO TEAM:These bullets make up the boilerplate that should be included in all external presentations. It ties in FIT with ICTC and covers the key differentiators for FIT.
  • Source: C21 Canada. “C21 Presents: Shifting Minds. A 21st century vision of public education for Canada.” May 2012.Disengagement crisis among learners from traditional learning & teaching modules“The majority of students in the upper grades are not intellectually engaged in the classroom.”OECD, European Union, UNESCO and others have determined that multi-literate, creative and innovative people are the drivers of the 21st Century “We need Canadian citizens and their governments at all levels to understand the imperative for modernizing our educational systems to meet the new realities of the knowledge and digital eras.”Reinvigorating the Canadian educational system impacts economic, social, environmental and financial aspirations of Canadians.
  • Original Slide Content: By 2016, Canada will need more than 106,000 ICT workersSystemic shortage of soft skills required for a 21st Century ICT A pervasive mismatch between the capabilities needed by employers and the skills and experience of many ICT job-seekers.Youths are not choosing ICT as a career choiceNot perceived as fun, viable or profitable career choiceDo not see the opportunities available in ICTIt is no longer enough to be a technical expert: the industry now needs workers with multidisciplinary skills. ICT professionals are increasingly required to understand the business of their companies—the marketing, operations and HR management aspects, for example. Employers are on the hunt for personnel who have specific combinations of ICT experience as well as expertise in domains.In the next five years, Canada is going to see a new, radically different ICT job market emerge.By 2016, Canada will need more than 106,000 ICT workers.In most regions, there will be systemic shortages of ICT workers with the capabilities needed by employers.At the heart of these systemic shortages is a pervasive mismatch between the capabilities needed by employers and the skills and experience of many ICT job-seekers.The consequences of this pervasive mismatch will beSerious recruitment challenges for employers, andDrawn out and often frustrating job searches for many ICT job-seekers, especially those with <5years of experience. PLUS: Youth do not fully comprehend the opportunities available for those with an ICT background
  • Behind the pervasive mismatch is a change in the nature of ICT careers.Declining needs: ‘Commodity Skills’ – application use (Microsoft, etc). Companies assuming you already know how to use Word, Excel, etc.ICT technical capabilities only.Growing needs:ICT skills combined with soft skills (communications, team work) and ‘context skills’, i.e., understanding the business needs and processes to which ICT is applied,ICT skills combined with technical skills from other domains, e.g., ehealth, manufacturing, finance, etc..
  • ICTC’s objective in pursuing the FIT program is to enhance the supply of ICT workers to the labour market in Canada. Current projections indicate that net demand for ICT workers will be in the neighbourhood of 20,000 per year with domestic graduates filling somewhere between 50% and 70% of requirements.
  • FOCUS is a secondary-school program for Grades 11 and 12Delivered through hands-on learningBased on teamwork, creating and running simulated businesses Allows greater knowledge and work skills necessary to make ICT a career choice Based on learning outcomes validated by business, industry and educatorsThe core FOCUS program focuses on:Developing PC maintenance skillsNetwork Administration technical proficiencyMedia, Graphics and Communications explorationsEmployability/essential skillsBusiness/entrepreneurship aptitudeDeveloping work experience skillsThe FIT program aims to help students…Acquire an understanding of the workplace environment Develop relevant business and technical skillsMake effective and informed career choices in the ICT fieldIncorporate business and technical competencies into their future learning
  • Research in 2010 suggested the costs could be anywhere from 20% to 200%Survey conducted by Harris Interactive, 41% said a bad hire cost more than $25,000 and 25% identified the cost was over $50,000.Associated costs are anywhere between 20% to 200%Survey by Harris Interactive: 41% said a bad hire cost more than $25,000 and 25% identified the cost was over $50,000.Factors contributing to the cost of a bad hire:Writing and replacing a job ads, screening candidates, phone calls and emails, arranging and conducting interviews, checking referencesTraining, client impact, cultural impact, relocation, signing bonuses, and timeLess productivityLost time to recruit and train another workerCost to recruit and train another worker Employee morale negatively affectedNegative impact on client solutions
  • The Information and Communications Technology Council (ICTC) is a centre of expertise in ICT research and labour market intelligence, policy development, and program management. Through our strong network of industry, academia and government, we enable the development of Canada’s future skilled and innovative talent, empowering industries to maintain a competitive advantage in a global market.ICTC’s unique position:Authoritative, best-in-class ICT business intelligenceIndependent, neutral policy advisorEstablished networks of partners (government, industry, academia, and international)Strong program management and delivery
  • ICTC is a leader in developing workforce solutions, enabling Canadian businesses to access the right talent with the right skills needed to drive innovation and productivity in an increasingly competitive environment.In order to ensure Canada is able to meet the demand of future ICT labour needs, we consider all labour market sources including domestic and international. Our programs provide unique and targeted solutions for recruiting, retaining and integrating women, aboriginals, youth and internationally educated professionals into ICT workforce.The objective of ICTC’s Standards and Certification is to identify and develop competency profiles and career pathways for key in-demand occupations and domain knowledge areas (DKAs). The profiles will facilitate the development of human resource strategies targeted at training and recruitment, thereby ensuring an adequate supply of qualified workers for this growing sector.The I-ADVACE certification program - is an industry-wide certification program designed to validate and recognize the technical knowledge, industry experience, business and interpersonal skills of ICT professionals. The goal? To equip professionals with a unique, integrated certification that meets national industry standards. No other certification program combines technical and soft skills like I-ADVANCE™ does.
  • What are we doing in some of these provinces right now?Nova Scotia – MoE, 5 school boardsQuebec – different pathway through CEGEP, helping the francophone communities across Canada (& NB)Ontario – some of our original pilot schools and largest boards in Canada. SHSM program (sector focus).Manitoba – First FIT school, FIT Launch, Dep Min of Ed, sign MOU, feature 4 FIT schools (Van, TO, Calgary, Ottawa) & a student testemonial from Taylor McDougall from James M Hill Memorial High School last year, currently attending Concordia University as a Film Production major,thought I knew what I was going to do after I graduated. I was planning to go into theatre, it was something I had done all my life and it seemed like the obvious choice. I had all the required credits to get into my program, so I took a couple FIT recognized technology courses. This changed her pathway.Saskatchewan – First school board & FIT crosswalk.British Columbia – MoE piloting a pathway model using ICT and the FIT program as one of two pilots.
  • FOCUS is a secondary-school program for Grades 11 and 12Delivered through hands-on learningBased on teamwork, creating and running simulated businesses Allows greater knowledge and work skills necessary to make ICT a career choice Based on learning outcomes validated by business, industry and educatorsThe core FOCUS program focuses on:Developing PC maintenance skillsNetwork Administration technical proficiencyMedia, Graphics and Communications explorationsEmployability/essential skillsBusiness/entrepreneurship aptitudeDeveloping work experience skillsThe FIT program aims to help students…Acquire an understanding of the workplace environment Develop relevant business and technical skillsMake effective and informed career choices in the ICT fieldIncorporate business and technical competencies into their future learning
  • This diagram summarizes how FIT is effective in giving students the skills, knowledge and abilities they need to build a career path in IT.The Information and Communication Technology Council is the Canadian not-for-profit sector council that manages FIT.We champion collaboration among all stakeholders and are a catalyst for action and solutions on labour market issues, leading the development of Canada’s ICT workforce.ICTC is committed to working with governments, education and industry to ensure young people are prepared for what the future holds in terms of employment.We are dedicated to ensuring Canada’s ICT sector is made up of a prepared, diverse and highly educated workforce.We:Define HR issuesFacilitate shift from school to workRecruit, retain workersDevelop occupational standards, competenciesPromote the workplace as a learning placeDevelop sector, career awareness strategies
  • Students enrolled in FIT:Become keenly aware of the influence and impact technology has in our daily livesUnderstand the role of ICT in all types of enterprisesIdentify and explore career opportunities within ICTApply specific ICT skills to develop solutions
  • Students learn most effectively through personal observation, investigation and action. A special business simulation model allows FIT students to practise the techniques they’re acquiring, making their skills more readily applicable to the workforce.Real work experience is possible through FIT-assisted summertime, youth apprenticeship or co-op placements
  • FIT students complete high school with tangible benefitsadvanced standing for future studies ready to write major ICT certification examsvaluable career-ready skills certified accreditation that is recognized by employers across Canada
  • This slide demonstrates how the student is supported by these three partners. The student is at the center with her existing IT skills – those she has acquired by virtue of the world she lives in. FIT works because it’s a program where ICTC, education and industry work together to help students become successful, digital, global citizens.The student is supported by ICTC through FIT, and by education through a 21st century learning environment. Then, armed with her essential ICT and business skills, the student is able to proceed down a career path into any industry in any sector.What results is a better, more well-rounded student entering post-secondary or the workforce.
  • Network & Operations Support Concentration IT Essentials Discover/ Exploration Industry Credential (e.g. A+ and Net+ Certification) Work Experience FIT Certificate Software Design & Development Concentration ICTC approved programming languageIndustry Credential (e.g. Java Certification)Work Experience FIT Certificate Interactive Media ConcentrationPathways through High School Industry Credential (e.g. Adobe Certifications) Work Experience FIT Certificate Business & Information Analysis ConcentrationEnhanced business and technical skills to analyze business needs and propose solutionsReviewing possible Industry CredentialWork ExperienceFIT Certificate
  • The approach was one of simplicity.
  • As a team, we identified a room to designate solely to the Tech Support side of the program then establish a core group of teachers and a coordinator. The team consists of the following:Having the same core group of professionals makes tracking/monitoring student’s progress within the FIT Program more efficient
  • In order for students to flow through the program successfully, we establish a tracking form which is used at the end of first semester then again at the end of second semester. Through coordination with our guidance department, we track students using a spreadsheet based on the information of the tracking sheet, paying close attention to graduates then looking at course placement for those graduating the next year.We also, through the help of Guidance and our administration, indicate the FIT Tracking in all subject areas within our course registration booklet. Course have the “FIT” wording beside them to help students choose the area of study.
  • The major concerns were firstly set up. Our technician put in long hours to sort out the logistics of secure set up then to enable access through Frederiction. As well, the administration test was long and required about 12 hours of prep prior to writing. Our other concern was the test the students were doing covered 16 chapters of the of CISCO material for IT Fundalmentals. The curriculum for the IT Course only covered the first 10 chapters. As a result of this, we submitted a local option course which we will run second semester to cover the final 6 Chapters and combine practice testing in order to better prepare our students for final industry standard testing.
  • Now that we have all the competencies available and the gaps identified what do we need to do?Having a method or process that teachers can take advantage of is the next importance.The most effective way is a web site and IRP or Integrated Resource Package.For Canada wide usage and for you to use it.And now we will tell you how easy it is for you to do this.
  • Transcript

    • 1. FOCUS IT/FOCUS TIInnovative Teaching, Real Learning Click to edit Master subtitle style
    • 2. Table of Content Educational Crisis Canada’s Future Who is ICTC Why FIT Works Introducing FIT Why FIT What is FIT How FIT Works Testimonials www.focusit.ca/www.ictc-ctic.ca
    • 3. Educational CrisisDisengagement crisis among learners from traditional learning & teaching modules“The majority of students in the upper grades are not intellectually engaged in the classroom.” Source: C21 Canada. “C21 Presents: Shifting Minds. A 21st century vision of public education for Canada.” May 2012. www.focusit.ca/www.ictc-ctic.ca
    • 4. Canada’s Future Multi-literate, creative and innovativepeople are the drivers of the 21st Century Reinvigorating the Canadian educational system impacts economic, social, environmental and financial aspirations of Canadians Source: C21 Canada. “C21 Presents: Shifting Minds. A 21st century vision of public education for Canada.” May 2012. www.focusit.ca/www.ictc-ctic.ca
    • 5. The Situation  By 2016, Canada will need more than 106,000 ICT workers  Systemic shortage of soft skills  Mismatch between capabilities  Youth are not choosing ICT as a career  Not seen as fun, viable or profitable  Unaware of the opportunities available in ICT  Canadian graduates lack the right blend of skills to compete in the digital economy  21st Century Skillswww.focusit.ca/www.ictc-ctic.ca
    • 6. What is ICT?  Information Communications Technology  A constantly evolving term:  “All the uses of digital technology that already exist to help individuals, businesses and organizations use information.”  “ICT covers any product that will store, retrieve, manipulate, transmit or receive information electronically in a digital form.” http://www.tutor2u.net/business/ict/intro_what_is_ict.htmwww.focusit.ca/www.ictc-ctic.ca
    • 7. 21st Century SkillsWhat are They: Solve real problems Engage with knowledge that matters Be respected See how subjects are interconnected Learn from and with each other and people in their community Connect with experts and expertise Have more opportunities for dialogue and conversationHow to Learn Them: Applied, project-based and interdisciplinary learning Collaborative learning Inquiry and investigation Technology for learning Demonstration of competence Personalized learning Information access, analysis, synthesis and the generation of new ideas www.focusit.ca/www.ictc-ctic.ca
    • 8. Changing ICT Needs Growing Needs:  ICT, Soft-skills & 21st Century Skills  Hybrid ICT & Technical SkillsDeclining Needs: General Application Skills ICT Technical Capabilities www.focusit.ca/www.ictc-ctic.ca
    • 9. Problem Definition & Potential Opportunity  ICTC’s objective is to enhance the supply of ICT workers to the labour market in Canada by educating youth on the benefits of STEAM:  Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts & Math ICTC has the platform and research to highlight impending skill-set shortage; however, we must reach a variety of stakeholders at every level to change the misconceptions of STEAM careers:    www.focusit.ca/www.ictc-ctic.ca
    • 10. Atlantic Canada Employment Growth: 2000 to 2012 Computer Engineers Business Analysts Computer Programmers User Support Technicians 220Employment Growth Index: Year 2000 = 100 200 180 160 140 120 100 80 60 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 www.focusit.ca/www.ictc-ctic.ca
    • 11. How This Affects Business The cost of a Bad Hire:  Of new hires 46% fail within 18 months  Another 45% are only fair to marginal performers  That means that 81% of new hires are a disappointment Associated costs are anywhere between 20% to 200% Factors contributing to the cost of a bad hire:  Less productivity, lost time, cost to recruit and train, employee morale, and negative impact on client solutions Source: http://www.recruitingblogs.com/profiles/blogs/bad-hires-stats-costs-avoidance-poor-excuses-and-other-thoughts www.focusit.ca/www.ictc-ctic.ca
    • 12. Who is ICTC  The Information and Communication Technology Council (ICTC):  Dedicated to ensuring Canada’s ICT sector is made up of a prepared, diverse and highly educated workforce  Centre of expertise in ICT research and labour market intelligence, policy development, and program management  Network of industry, education & government:  Develop Canada’s future skilled and innovative talent  Empower industries to maintain a competitive advantage in a global marketwww.focusit.ca/www.ictc-ctic.ca
    • 13. Talent Programs Women in IT Youth Initiatives  Focus on IT  Career Focus Standards  I-ADVANCETM Career Transitions  Bridge Training for Internationally Educated Professionals Aboriginal Inclusion www.focusit.ca/www.ictc-ctic.ca
    • 14. Introducingwww.focusit.ca/www.ictc-ctic.ca
    • 15. FIT SCHOOLS - 124 2 27 1 11 32 2 (5) 18www.focusit.ca/www.ictc-ctic.ca
    • 16. What is FIT?  FOCUS program for Grades 11 and 12  Delivered through hands-on learning  Project- based learning built on teamwork  Increased awareness and understanding along with skill development for an ICT career  Based on learning outcomes validated by business, industry and educators  The core FOCUS program:  Developing PC maintenance skills  Network Administration technical proficiency  Media, Graphics and Communications explorations  Employability/essential skills  Business/entrepreneurship aptitude  Developing work experience skillswww.focusit.ca/www.ictc-ctic.ca
    • 17. Why FIT Workswww.focusit.ca/www.ictc-ctic.ca
    • 18. FIT Students  Aware of impacts of technology  Understand the role of ICT in industry  Explore ICT career opportunities  Apply ICT skills to develop solutionswww.focusit.ca/www.ictc-ctic.ca
    • 19. Innovative & Realistic Learn by seeing, thinking, & doing Practise FIT skills to make them better prepared for 21st century Experience through internships or co-ops www.focusit.ca/www.ictc-ctic.ca
    • 20. The FIT Advantage FIT Graduates:  Potential advanced standing for future studies  Better prepared to write major ICT certification exams  Valuable career-ready skills  Recognized by employers across Canadawww.focusit.ca/www.ictc-ctic.ca
    • 21. How FIT Workswww.focusit.ca/www.ictc-ctic.ca
    • 22. FIT Umbrella FIT approved curriculum: Cisco Networking Academy, Adobe Certified, Java Working with: Junior Achievement, Microsoft, HP, Toon Boom, Oracle, Career Cruising, Pearson Vue, Pearson Ed, Linuxwww.focusit.ca/www.ictc-ctic.ca
    • 23. FIT Creates Pathways  FIT School – sector focus  Career Exploration  To University  To College  To Work  To Entrepreneurship  Industry/Work/Economic Development  Making Canada Strongwww.focusit.ca/www.ictc-ctic.ca
    • 24. FIT Team Members Tracy Biernacki-Dusza National Program Manager Pamela Bahlis Talent Initiatives Coordinator Randy Fisher Education Specialist Emily Jamieson Web Content Specialist Jazmine Fenton FIT Internwww.focusit.ca/www.ictc-ctic.ca
    • 25. FIT Provincial Representatives Wayne Oakley, Atlantic  w.oakley@ictc-ctic.ca Dennis Hitchmough, Ontario  d.hitchmough@ictc-ctic.ca Celine Loslier, Quebec  c.loslier@ictc-ctic.ca Cameron Mateika, Manitoba  c.matieka@ictc-ctic.ca Nancy Burkell, Saskatchewan  n.burkell@ictc-ctic.ca Debbie Vance, Alberta & British Columbia  d.vance@ictc-ctic.ca www.focusit.ca/www.ictc-ctic.ca
    • 26. Finding Your FIT General Technical Competencies General Business Competencies Network & Operations Support Concentration Software Design & Development Concentration Interactive Media Concentration Business & Information Analysis Concentrationwww.focusit.ca/www.ictc-ctic.ca
    • 27. Business & Information Analysis  Business analyst  Analyst-designer  Systems analyst  Information Analyst  Relationship manager  Project Leader  Business Architect  Information Architect  Quality Assurance Analyst  Data Administrator  User education & technical writingwww.focusit.ca/www.ictc-ctic.ca
    • 28. Software Design & Development Analyst-programmer Applications software integrator Programmer Software designer Database design Data Architect Technical Architect User interface designer Games designer E-commerce developer Technology consultant www.focusit.ca/www.ictc-ctic.ca
    • 29. Network & System Operations User technical support expert Help desk operator Problem manager Network planner Security expert Hardware/software platform specialist Computer operator Mobile/wireless communications planner & support expert www.focusit.ca/www.ictc-ctic.ca
    • 30. Interactive Media  Web designer  Web developer  Web master  Database administrator  Social media developer  Games design and developer  User interface designer  E-commerce developerwww.focusit.ca/www.ictc-ctic.ca
    • 31. FIT Competency Example Analytical Thinking 1 COMPETENCY CAPABILITY LEARNING OUTCOME Clearly describes a problem or opportunity and theAnalytical Thinking 1 Analyzes basic situations. impact it has/could have on the organization. Examines a multiple layer problem to understand its trueAnalytical Thinking 1 Analyzes basic situations. source, i.e., root cause analysis.Analytical Thinking 1 Analyzes basic situations. Identifies opportunities stemming from a situation.Analytical Thinking 1 Gathers input/information from different sources. Observes and documents a problem. Identifies and interviews key personnel and documentsAnalytical Thinking 1 Gathers input/information from different sources. significant findings and possible solutions. Explores detailed information related to the problem orAnalytical Thinking 1 Gathers input/information from different sources. opportunity. Investigates possible solutions documenting impacts forAnalytical Thinking 1 Gathers input/information from different sources. each option. Distinguishes between critical, important and irrelevant pieces of information and usesAnalytical Thinking 1 Identifies recurring patterns in the information received. them to reach an appropriate conclusion. Distinguishes between critical, important and irrelevant pieces of information and uses Identifies unique issues that are not relevant to theAnalytical Thinking 1 them to reach an appropriate conclusion. problem/opportunity. Distinguishes between critical, important and irrelevant pieces of information and usesAnalytical Thinking 1 Identifies the critical elements of this situation. them to reach an appropriate conclusion.www.focusit.ca/www.ictc-ctic.ca
    • 32. FIT Competency Example Analytical Thinking 2 COMPETENCY CAPABILITY LEARNING OUTCOME Identifies an organizational problem or opportunity toAnalytical Thinking 2 Clearly articulates a problem or opportunity. explore. Documents in detail the scope and nature of anAnalytical Thinking 2 Clearly articulates a problem or opportunity. organizational problem or opportunity. Understands the organizational context in which theAnalytical Thinking 2 Clearly articulates a problem or opportunity. problem or opportunity is present. Identifies all information used in the process involved andAnalytical Thinking 2 Clearly articulates a problem or opportunity. additional information needed and how it flows through the process. Diagrams the flow of the process involved, the peopleAnalytical Thinking 2 Clearly articulates a problem or opportunity. involved and the information they use. Identifies missing information or problems withAnalytical Thinking 2 Gathers information from the organization to clarify what solutions are possible. information. Identifies handoffs, obstacles, time lags and other issuesAnalytical Thinking 2 Gathers information from the organization to clarify what solutions are possible. affecting the problem.Analytical Thinking 2 Gathers information from the organization to clarify what solutions are possible. Identifies duplication of effort. Identifies organizational considerations affecting aAnalytical Thinking 2 Gathers information from the organization to clarify what solutions are possible. solution. Documents causes and consequences of actions andAnalytical Thinking 2 Gathers information from the organization to clarify what solutions are possible. events that are not readily apparent. Documents two possible process options, their businessAnalytical Thinking 2 Redesigns a process to be more effective or efficient. value, and the changes that would be required.Analytical Thinking 2 Redesigns a process to be more effective or efficient. Recommends and justifies a preferred solution.www.focusit.ca/www.ictc-ctic.ca
    • 33. FIT CrosswalkICTC & FIT National New Brunswick Courses CreatedStandards Teacher Focus Group Directly to FIT Standards• Labour Market • Luc Plourde Information Tech 120 Information • Kathy MacDonald BOM 120• National Occupation • Sarah-Jane Smith Entrepreneurship 110 Codes (NOC) • Charlene Melanson Computer Science 110• Industry Capabilities • Ray O’Donnell Technical Support 110 Identified • Ryan Murphy Digital Tech 120• Development of ICTC • Mike Whelton Capabilities, • Mike Cusack Competencies & • Brian Gray Learning Outcomes• Industry Validated• Education Validatedwww.focusit.ca/www.ictc-ctic.ca
    • 34. New Brunswick Alignment to FIT Curriculumwww.focusit.ca/www.ictc-ctic.ca
    • 35. FIT Early Adopter Mission Statement  St. Malachy’s Memorial High School is committed to educating the whole person. Through a rigorous and comprehensive program of studies we prepare students – academically, socially and morally – to assume their places as conscientious, involved and contributing members of society. Approach – Simplicity!www.focusit.ca/www.ictc-ctic.ca
    • 36. FIT Implementation  The Team:  Beth Horgan, Principal  Mike Whelton, Vice Principal  Ray O’Donnell, SPR For Technology, FIT Coordinator  Ryan Murphy – Teacher, Tech Support/Digital Technology/IT 120/Computer Science  Charlene Melanson – Teacher, Business Organization & Management/Entrepreneurship  Guidance Departmentwww.focusit.ca/www.ictc-ctic.ca
    • 37. FIT Implementationwww.focusit.ca/www.ictc-ctic.ca
    • 38. FIT Implementation Tech Support Facility Peason Vue Testing Centrewww.focusit.ca/www.ictc-ctic.ca
    • 39. FIT Implementation IT Essentials course  10 Chapters  Local option course for final 6 chapterswww.focusit.ca/www.ictc-ctic.ca
    • 40. New Brunswick is a FIT CHAMPIONProvincial AlignmentJamie O’Toole FocusIT Website FIT Teaching Resources (IRP)Pan Canadian Model for Education Interconnected Learning System from Secondary to Post-Secondary www.focusit.ca/www.ictc-ctic.ca
    • 41. FIT Students Say…“It was unique – an open learningenvironment. You learn the academicside, but it’s more about how you manageyour time, assess a project and set goals.”  Ryan Clark, FIT Student“Last Spring I got my acceptance toConcordia’s Mel Hoppenheim School ofCinema, which one of the most reputablefilm schools in Canada. Before I took myFIT Digital Tech class I had never toucheda camera or editing software. It may soundcheesy to say but I honestly wouldn’t behere if I hadn’t taken the course in highschool.”  Taylor McDougall, FIT Student www.focusit.ca/www.ictc-ctic.ca
    • 42. FIT Support Ahead FIT Website Soft Launch  Newsletter  Sections for:  Students/Parents  Teachers  Industry Teacher Resource Section IRP – Integrated Resource Packagewww.focusit.ca/www.ictc-ctic.ca
    • 43. Stay Connected Visit: www.ictc-ctic.ca Contact us: fit-media@ictc-ctic.ca Follow us: @FOCUSITcawww.focusit.ca/www.ictc-ctic.ca

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