The Art Copywriting

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about copy writing for difft types of ads

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The Art Copywriting

  1. 1. TheArt ofCopywriting<br />
  2. 2. Presented by –Priyam GuptaNazneenWahabManaliThombreKhushboo GandhiAyushi JainMonisha .I<br />
  3. 3. “The cat sat on the mat” <br />
  4. 4. is not a story.<br />
  5. 5. “The cat sat on the dog’s mat,”<br />
  6. 6. now that’s a story.(Gerry Miller, creative director, Dentsu)<br />
  7. 7. Advertising is both art and science.<br />
  8. 8.
  9. 9. Creation stage encompasses of :<br /><ul><li>Idea generation
  10. 10. Copywriting
  11. 11. Illustrating
  12. 12. Layout</li></li></ul><li>The Creative Process<br /><ul><li>Fact finding :
  13. 13. Problem finding
  14. 14. Preparation
  15. 15. Idea finding :
  16. 16. Idea production
  17. 17. Idea development</li></li></ul><li>
  18. 18.
  19. 19. Keil’’s six myths of creative people : <br />Creative people are sophisticated and wordly. They are cultured, well read, and snobbish.<br />Creative people are more intelligent than others.<br />Creative people are disorganized<br />Creative people are witty and seldom boring.<br />Creative people are more involved with liquor and drugs than others are.<br />Drugs and alcohol stimulates creative thinking.<br />
  20. 20. COPY WRITING<br />
  21. 21. Stages of Advertising development<br />
  22. 22. JOHN CAPLES, member of advertising hall of fame .<br />Caples states that:<br /> “ best ads are written from the heart.” “write down every idea that comes to your head, every selling phrase every key word. Write down the good and wild ideas.<br /> Don’t try to edit your ideas at the start. <br /> Don’t put a brake on your imagination”<br />
  23. 23. Advertisement created by Caples (US school of Music)<br />
  24. 24. Checklist of important guidelines for copywriting given by john caples<br />Cash in on your personal experience.<br />Organize your experience.<br />Write from the heart.<br />Learn from the experience of others<br />Talk with the manufacturer<br />Study the product<br />Review previous advertising for the product<br />Study competitors ads<br />Study testimonials from customers<br />Solve the prospects problem<br />Put your subconscious mind to work<br />Ring the changes on a successful idea<br />
  25. 25. Use of successful idea<br />Example : retirement annuity<br />
  26. 26. Principles <br />General copy principles<br />Print copy principles<br />Television copy principles<br />Radio copy principles<br />Outdoor copy principles<br />Retail copy principles<br />Business to business ads<br />Advertising on the internet<br />
  27. 27. General copy principles<br />No specific rules for good copy.<br />Effective copy:<br /><ul><li>is simple
  28. 28. one or two key ideas
  29. 29. idea unique to the brand
  30. 30. ads should flow naturally and smoothly from beginning to end</li></li></ul><li>Do’s for good copy <br />Use facts and figures<br />Frequently mention the brand name and key benefit<br />Conclude the ad by linking back to the beginning. <br />Keep the format simple, uncluttered and straightforward<br />Message should always be true to the product<br />
  31. 31.
  32. 32. DON’Ts for good copy<br /><ul><li>Too much information
  33. 33. Too many scene changes
  34. 34. Scenes not well integrated
  35. 35. complicated language</li></li></ul><li>Print copy principles.<br />
  36. 36. Key element: HEAD LINE (eg: FREE) <br />
  37. 37.
  38. 38. Headline and visual <br /> should complement<br /> each other to tell the<br /> story.<br />
  39. 39.
  40. 40. BODY COPY: detailed and specific(support the headline , readable and interesting) <br />
  41. 41. Use of subheads and captions<br />
  42. 42. Extra recall information: both picture and word<br />make your little one happy, this birthday<br />
  43. 43. Message of ads should be memorable<br />ICY VODKA<br />
  44. 44. Television copy principles<br />Advantage of visual nature - use of demonstration, pack close-up and like.<br />Message contained in picture is important.<br />High recall score if contain more frequent visual representation of brand name, package, and key product attributes.<br />High persuasion score(no. of shot goes up, recall, persuasion goes down)<br />Camera angle: bigger picture-favorable ad<br />
  45. 45. Radio copy principles<br />Write copy to create picture in the minds eye of listener.<br />Use of human voice, sound effect, humor, music.<br />Mention brand name and key selling benefit early and often.<br />Short words and short sentences<br />
  46. 46.
  47. 47. Outdoor copy principles<br />Copy and visual: short, simple, strong and obvious.<br />More recalls if have fewer words.<br />On right hand sides of highways<br />
  48. 48. Retail copy principles<br />Must contain specifics about the merchandise being offered(exact size, colours, prices)<br />
  49. 49. Business to business ads<br />Should be informative, offer specifics, serious but not boring.<br />Case histories: (how advertised brand helped someone else in similar situations. <br />
  50. 50. Long copy ads are good, but should focus on single benefit and should have single dramatic image.<br />Coupon or phone no.<br />
  51. 51. Advertising on the internet<br />Advertisements on internet and worldwideweb<br />Another avenue of electronic commerce<br />Homepages to be accesed by web browsers,<br />
  52. 52. ILLUSTRATING<br /><ul><li> Illustrating involves generation of pictures.
  53. 53. Involves decisions as to what “identification marks” to include.
  54. 54. These fall into one of the three categories:</li></ul>Company or trade name <br />Brand name<br />Trademarks<br />
  55. 55. 1.Company or trade name:eg<br />Del monte<br />Levi strauss<br />
  56. 56. Trademarks,service marks and certification marks like “Good Housekeeping” seal of approval must also be considered for inclusion in the visual materials.<br />
  57. 57. Using a caricature or identifying symbol<br />The Green Giant<br />Pillsbury doughboy<br />Mr.Peanut<br />
  58. 58. Characteristics of a trademark:<br /><ul><li> it is brief
  59. 59. Easy to remember
  60. 60. Easily readable
  61. 61. Easily speakable
  62. 62. Easily adapted to any media
  63. 63. Suitable for export
  64. 64. Subtle
  65. 65. Has no pleasant connotations
  66. 66. Lends to pictorialization</li></li></ul><li>Crucial decisions of Print Advertising<br /><ul><li>Visual content
  67. 67. Color
  68. 68. Artwork
  69. 69. Identification mark</li></li></ul><li>Crucial descisions of TV advertising<br />More emphasis is laid on action and the dynamics of each scene<br />How one scene will blend with the next.<br /> How video materials will serve to enhance and reinforce the audio message<br />Which will be mainly attention getters<br />Which will carry the copy points etc.<br />E.g.: American Express<br />
  70. 70. LAYOUT<br /><ul><li>The layout activity involves bringing all the pieces together before the advertising is sent out for production.
  71. 71. It involves descision as to how the various components of headline, illustration,copy,and identification marks are to be arranged and positioned on the page.
  72. 72. The size of the advertisement will obviously have an effect on this descision.
  73. 73. The layout activity will differ in case of print and broadcast</li></li></ul><li>
  74. 74.
  75. 75. 5 COSIDERAIONS TO BE TAKEN INTO ACCOUNT WHIL DEVELOPING PRINT LAYOUT<br />
  76. 76. 1. BALANCE: The arrangement of elements to achieve a pleasing distribution or visual impression.<br />2. CONTRAST: Using different sizes,shapes densities, ad colors to enhance attention value and readability.<br />3. PROPORTION: The relation of objects to the background in which they appear and to each other.<br />4. GAZE-MOTION: The headline,illustration,copy and identification marks in that order will usually provide the most logical sequence for gaze-motion.<br />
  77. 77. 5.UNITY: The qualities of balance , contrast, proportion, and gaze-motion should be combined to develop unity of thought,appearance and design in the layout.<br />EG :COUPON<br />Unity is best achieved by :<br /><ul><li>keeping the layout simple (use of “white space”)
  78. 78. keeping the layout unclutterd
  79. 79. to ease the reader’s task in comprehending the advertisement.</li></li></ul><li>STEPHEN BAKER-DRAWS DITINCTION BETWEEN “ARRANGING ELEMENTS ON A PAGE” AND “VISUALIZING AN IDEA”<br /> THE FORMER IS A DESIGNER’S (OR LAYOUT MAN’S ) FEAT,HIS INNATE SENSE OF COMPOSITION,BALANCE,COLOR IS BROUGHT FULLY INTO PLAY. ON THE OTHER HAND,PRESENTING THE CLEAREST VIASUAL INTERPRETATION REQUIRES A STRONG DESIRE TO COMMUNICATE WITH THE AUDIENCE, A FLAIR FOR THE DRAMATIC,THE ABILITY TO THINK IN PICTORAIL TERMS(USUALLY REFERRED TO AS “VISUAL SENSE”) AND,PROBABLY,MOST SIGNIFICANT,A FIRM ADVERTISING OF THE ADVERTISERS GOAL<br />
  80. 80. CLASSIFICATION OF PRINT AD LAYOUT STYLES<br />PICTURE WINDOW(ALSO CALLED AYER #1)<br />MONDRIAN/GRID<br />TYPE SPECIMEN<br />COPY-HEAVY<br />FRAME<br />SILHOUETTE<br />MULTIPANEL<br />CIRCUS<br />REBUS<br />
  81. 81. Mondrain/Grid<br />Picture Window<br />
  82. 82. Copy-heavy<br />Type-specimen<br />
  83. 83. Frame<br />Silhouette<br />
  84. 84. Multipanel<br />Circus<br />
  85. 85. FORMS OF LAYOUT OF A TELEVISION COMMERCIAL<br />PRIMITIVE<br />COMPREHENSIVE<br />
  86. 86. TYPES OF TELEVISION COMMERCIALS<br />STORY LINE<br />PROBLEM<br />CHRONOLOGY<br />SPECIAL EFFECTS<br />TESTIMONIAL<br />SATIRE<br />SPOKESPERSON<br />DEMONSTRATION<br />SUSPENSE<br />SLICE-OF-SLICE<br />ANALOGY<br />FANTASY<br />PERSONALITY<br />
  87. 87. In testimonials ,spokesperson and demonstration commercials the credibility of the source and/or the mode of presentation are likely to be most important<br />structures <br />In storyline , problem solution, chronology and analogy structures, focus would tend to center more o n the type of argument(for eg : one-versus two sided or refutation)or the order of argument(primacy-recency , stating a conclusion) dimensions <br />
  88. 88. Orientation <br />TESTIMONIAL PERSONALITY<br />SPOKESPERSON SLICE-OF-LIFE<br />STORY-LINE FANTASY<br />DEMONSTRATION SPECIAL EFFECTS<br />PROBLEM SOLUTION SATIRE<br />CHRONOLOGY SUSPENSE<br />ANALOGY<br />EMOTIONAL <br />ORIENTATION<br />FACTUAL <br />ORIENTATION<br />
  89. 89. HENRY LASKEY,ELLEN DAY,MELVIN CRASK<br />
  90. 90.
  91. 91.
  92. 92. Styles of Creative Giants of Advertising…… <br />David Ogilvy: The Brand Image<br /><ul><li>Concerned with developing and retaining a prestige image.
  93. 93. It pays to protect favorable image in the long run.
  94. 94. Every advertisement should contribute in enhancing the brand image.
  95. 95. Bargain Basement image of the brand lowers the esteem of the product.</li></li></ul><li><ul><li>Personality of the brand is particularly important if brands are similar eg beer, detergents, cigarettes.
  96. 96. The manufacturer who dedicates his advertising to building the most sharply defined personality for his brand will get the largest share of the market at the highest profit.</li></li></ul><li><ul><li>Ogilvy’s most well known campaign is the use of prestigious individuals to convey the desired image for the product.
  97. 97. He actually used clients to represent their own product:</li></ul>Commander Whitehead for Schweppes Tonic<br />Helena Rubinstein for her line of cosmetics<br />
  98. 98. <ul><li>Ogilvy used to obtain testimonials from celebrities.
  99. 99. He used Queen Elizabeth and Winston Churchill in “Come to Britain” advertisements.
  100. 100. Also a campaign for the Reader’s Digest featured many national figures explaining that they relied on such a magazine because of their busy schedule. </li></li></ul><li><ul><li>Ogilvy puts forth eleven commandments for creating advertising campaigns:</li></ul>What you say is more important than how you say it.<br />Unless your campaign is built around a great idea, it will flop.<br />Give the facts.<br />Make advertisements that people want to read.<br />Be well mannered, but don’t clown.<br />Make your advertising contemporary.<br />
  101. 101. 7. Committees can criticize advertisements, but they cannot write them.<br />8. If you are lucky enough to write a good advertisement, repeat it until it stops pulling.<br />9. Never write an advertisement which you don’t want your own family to read.<br />10. Don’t be a copy cat.<br />11. The image and the brand comprises of the total brand personality.<br />
  102. 102. William Bernbach: Execution<br /><ul><li>In Bernbach style, the execution dominates. Execution can become content, it can be just as important as what you say.
  103. 103. There are certain execution characteristics that can be identified:</li></ul>Bernbach did not talk down to an audience. An audience is respected.<br />The approach is clean and direct.You must be as simple, and as swift and as penetrating as possible.<br />Advertisement should stand out from others. Nobody is going to see the ad if it is not said with freshness, originality and imagination.<br />Humor sells and can be used to gain attention.<br />
  104. 104. THE UNIQUE SELLING PROPOSITION<br />Each product develops its own USP and uses whatever repetition is necessary to communicate the USP to the audience.<br />The concept was given by Rosser Reeves.<br />Rosser believed when a good USP is found, the development of the actual advertisement becomes relatively an easy process.<br />
  105. 105. THREE GUIDELINES TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF USP<br />First, the proposition needs to involve a specific product benefit.<br />Second, it must be unique, one that competitors are not using.<br />Third, it must sell. It therefore must be important enough to influence the decision process.<br />
  106. 106. Reeves approach towards usp<br />Reeves relied heavily on product research to support specific claims(elaborate experiments) E.g. Ted Bates and Colgate<br />Once an effective USP is found, it should be retained over a long duration.<br />Such a philosophy requires vigorous defending, especially when a client gets tired of a campaign. <br />
  107. 107. Criticism of reeves approach<br />The approach was undoubtedly successful. However, the approach is highly controversial.<br />The style and its repetition was objectionable to the audience.<br />The use of USP was troublesome in political campaigns.<br />
  108. 108. LEO BURNETT<br />The Common Touch<br />
  109. 109. BURNETT’S APPROACH<br />According to Burnett “not only is great copy deceptively simple- but so are great ideas.<br />The best copywriters have the ability to put known and believable things into new relationships.<br />
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