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  • The Criteria are built on a number of interrelated Core Values and Concepts. These values and concepts are embedded beliefs and behaviors found in high-performing organizations. They are the foundation for integrating key performance and operational requirements within a results-oriented framework that creates a basis for action and feedback. This figure shows the role of the Core Values and Concepts. The Criteria are built on them. Core Values and Concepts are embedded in the systematic processes addressed in Criteria Categories 1 through 6. These systematic processes yield the performance results found in Criteria Category 7. Let’s take a closer look at these Core Values and Concepts.
  • Visionary Leadership: An organization’s senior leaders have a central role in setting directions and creating a customer focus. They must convey clear and visible values and high expectations. The organization’s defined values and strategies should help guide all of its activities and decisions. Senior leaders serve as role models and reinforce ethics, values, and expectations while building leadership, commitment, and initiative throughout the organization. Senior leaders should be responsible to the organization’s governance body for their actions and performance. Customer-Driven Excellence: Performance and quality are judged by an organization’s customers. Thus, your organization must take into account all product features and characteristics and all modes of customer access and support that contribute value for your customers and lead to customer acquisition, satisfaction, preference, and loyalty; to positive referrals; and, ultimately, to business expansion. Customer-driven excellence has both current and future components. It demands close attention to the voice of the customer, anticipation of marketplace changes, and a customer-focused culture. Therefore, it demands organizational agility. Organizational and Personal Learning: Organizational learning refers to continuous improvement of existing approaches and significant change or innovation, leading to new goals and approaches. Personal learning refers to education, training, and other opportunities for the continuous growth and development of your workforce, including senior leaders and volunteers. Learning is directed not only toward developing better products and services but also toward being more responsive, adaptive, innovative, and efficient—giving your organization marketplace sustainability and performance advantages and giving your workforce satisfaction and the motivation to excel.
  • Valuing Workforce Members and Partners: An organization’s success depends increasingly on an engaged workforce and on the diverse backgrounds, knowledge, skills, creativity, and motivation of its workforce and partners. Valuing the people in your workforce means committing to their engagement, satisfaction, development, and well-being. Internal partners may include unions and employees, while external partners may include customers, suppliers, and education or community organizations. Such partnerships may be a source of strategic advantage for an organization. Agility: Success in today’s ever-changing, globally competitive environment demands agility—a capacity for rapid change and flexibility. Organizations face ever-shorter cycles for the introduction of new/improved products, as well as for faster and more flexible responses to customers. Cycle time has become a key process measure. Focus on the Future: The pursuit of sustainable growth and sustained performance leadership requires a strong future orientation and a willingness to make long-term commitments to key stakeholders, such as your customers, workforce, suppliers, partners, and stockholders, as well as the public and your community. Managing for Innovation: Innovation is no longer strictly the purview of research and development departments. Organizations should be led and managed so that innovation becomes part of the learning culture, is integrated into daily work, and reaches across the entire organization. Innovation should lead the organization to new dimensions of performance.
  • Management by Fact: Performance improvement requires measurement and analysis. The measures selected should best represent the factors that lead to improved customer, operational, financial, and societal performance. Analysis of data entails determining trends, projections, and cause and effect in support of planning, improving operations, accomplishing change management, and comparing your organizational performance with that of competitors or with “best practices” benchmarks. Societal Responsibility: Leaders should stress responsibilities to the public, ethical behavior, and the need to consider societal well-being and benefit, which refers to leadership and support—within the limits of an organization’s resources—of publicly important purposes. Leaders should be role models in focusing on ethics and the protection of public health, safety, and the environment. They should go beyond mere compliance in these areas and focus on opportunities for improvement. Planning should anticipate adverse impacts that may arise and make available the information and support needed to maintain public awareness. Also, organizations should emphasize resource conservation and waste reduction at the source. Focus on Results and Creating Value: Results should be used to create and balance value for your key stakeholders. The use of a balanced composite of leading and lagging performance measures offers an effective means to communicate short- and longer-term priorities, monitor actual performance, and provide a clear basis for improving results. Systems Perspective: A systems perspective means managing the whole organization, as well as its key processes, to achieve results—and strive for performance excellence. The seven Baldrige Criteria Categories, the Core Values, and the Scoring Guidelines form the building blocks and the integrating mechanism for the system. This systems perspective is depicted in the following slide.
  • The framework provides a high-level overview of the Baldrige Criteria for Performance Excellence and illustrates how the Criteria provide a systems perspective for managing your organization to achieve performance excellence. From top to bottom, the framework has three basic elements—the Organizational Profile, the system operations, and the system foundation (Measurement, Analysis, and Knowledge Management). The Organizational Profile (the umbrella at the top of the figure) sets the context for the way your organization operates. Your environment, key working relationships, and strategic challenges and advantages serve as an overarching guide for your organizational performance management system. The system operations (middle of the figure) comprise two linked triads. The leadership triad—Leadership, Strategic Planning, and Customer Focus—emphasizes the importance of a leadership focus on strategy and customers. The results triad—Workforce Focus, Process Management, and Results—focuses on your workforce and key processes that accomplish the work of the organization that yields your overall performance results. ALL actions point toward Results. The horizontal arrow in the center of the framework links the two triads, a linkage critical to organizational success. The arrow indicates the central relationships between Leadership (Category 1) and Results (Category 7), as well as the importance of feedback in an effective performance management system. The system foundation (bottom of the figure) is composed of Measurement, Analysis, and Knowledge Management, which are critical to the effective management of your organization and to a fact-based, knowledge-driven system for improving performance and competitiveness.
  • This graphic is an aid for assessing and scoring Process Items (Categories 1 through 6). In each case, the arrows indicate the degree of consistency and coordination among organizational units. The circular shapes shown next to the arrows depict the relative clarity or definition of an organization’s goals. The steps are as follows: Reacting to Problems . Here operations are characterized by activities rather than by processes, and they are largely responsive to immediate needs or problems. In Early Systematic Approaches , the organization is at the beginning stages of conducting operations by processes with repeatability, evaluation and improvement, and some early coordination among organizational units. Aligned Approaches occur in the third step toward a mature process. At this stage, operations are repeatable and are regularly evaluated for improvement, with learnings shared and with coordination among organizational units. Integrated Approaches occur at the final stage of a mature process. The arrows indicate the evolution of the organization into an interconnected unit. At this stage, not only are processes repeatable, but also, in collaboration with other affected units, they are regularly evaluated for change and improvement. This collaboration and interconnection help organizations achieve efficiencies across units.
  • Whether being used as part of a self-assessment or as part of a Baldrige Award application, the Organizational Profile provides a snapshot of the organization, the key influences on how it operates, and the key challenges it faces. The placement of the Organizational Profile at the front of the Criteria sets the organizational context for responding to the Criteria Items. The Organizational Profile helps everyone (e.g., organizations using the Criteria for self-assessment, application writers, and reviewers) understand what is most relevant and important to the organization’s business and to its performance. The Organizational Profile is the starting point for self-assessment and for writing an Award application. If you identify topics for which conflicting, little, or no information is available, it is possible that your assessment need not go any further and you can use these topics for action planning. By addressing the questions in the Organizational Profile, potential gaps in key information can be identified, and areas that affect key performance requirements and results can be brought into focus. P.1 Organizational Description asks “What are your key organizational characteristics?” It asks an organization to describe its operating environment, including identifying its core competencies, and its key relationships with customers, stakeholders, suppliers, partners, and collaborators. It also asks for a description of your governance system. P.2 Organizational Situation asks “What is your organization’s strategic situation?” It asks an organization to describe its competitive environment, key strategic challenges and advantages, and system for performance improvement. It includes a request to identify available sources of comparative and competitive data to emphasize the need for these sources and to provide a context for later responses.
  • All responses to the Items within the boxed Categories (1 through 6) should address Process. Responses to the Results Items should address performance levels, trends, comparisons, and integration, as well as the breadth and importance of the results. Because the bottom line for any organization is results, almost half of the application points are for results. Results must be supported by linkages to the appropriate Process Items to show cause and effect. Results may be the bottom line, but they are accomplished through a successful performance management system that is guided from the top.
  • Category 1 (Leadership) examines how senior leaders’ personal actions guide and sustain your organization. It also examines your organization’s governance system and how the organization fulfills its legal, ethical, and societal responsibilities, as well as supports its key communities. 1.1 Senior Leadership asks “How do your senior leaders lead?” It focuses on how senior leaders set organizational vision and values; create an environment that fosters, requires, and results in legal and ethical behavior; create a sustainable organization; and create an environment for organizational improvement. It also asks how senior leaders communicate with and engage the workforce, create a focus on action to accomplish organizational objectives, and create and balance value for patients and other stakeholders in their performance expectations. 1.2 Governance and Societal Responsibilities asks “How do you govern and fulfill your societal responsibilities?” It examines several key aspects of your organization’s governance system and approach to leadership. It also asks how your organization assures legal and ethical behavior and fulfills its societal responsibilities. In addition, it asks you to describe how your organization supports its key communities.
  • Category 2 (Strategic Planning) addresses how your organization develops strategic objectives and action plans. It also examines how the chosen strategic objectives and action plans are deployed and changed if circumstances require it, and how progress is measured. Decisions about your organization’s core competencies are key strategic decisions. 2.1 Strategy Development asks “How do you develop your strategy?” It examines how your organization establishes its strategy to address its strategic objectives and leverage its strategic advantages. It addresses your long-term organizational sustainability, including your needed core competencies, and your ability to execute the strategic plan. It also examines how key strategic objectives balance the needs of all key stakeholders. 2.2 Strategy Deployment asks “How do you deploy your strategy?” It examines how your organization converts its strategic objectives into action plans to accomplish these objectives and how it deploys and assesses progress on its action plans. It also asks for your key performance measures or indicators and the performance projections for both your short- and longer-term planning horizons.
  • Category 3 (Customer Focus) examines how your organization engages its customers for long-term marketplace success. This engagement strategy includes how your organization builds a customer-focused culture. Also examined is how your organization listens to the voice of its customers and uses this information to improve and identify opportunities for innovation. 3.1 Customer Engagement asks “How do you engage customers to serve their needs and build relationships?” It asks how your organization determines product offerings and mechanisms to support customers’ use of your products. It examines how communication mechanisms vary for different customer groups and market segments. It also examines how your organization builds a customer-focused culture, including how your workforce performance management system reinforces this culture and how you build and manage relationships with customers to increase their engagement with you. 3.2 Voice of the Customer asks “How do you obtain and use information from your customers?” It examines how your organization listens to its customers, acquires satisfaction and dissatisfaction information, and uses customer information to improve its marketplace success. It also examines how customer listening mechanisms vary for different customer groups, market segments, and phases of the customer life cycle, as well as how you manage complaints. In addition, it asks how you use customer, market, and product offering information to identify and anticipate current and future customer groups and market segments, to identify key customer requirements, to improve marketing, and to identify opportunities for innovation.
  • Category 4 (Measurement, Analysis, and Knowledge Management) examines how your organization selects, gathers, analyzes, manages, and improves its data, information, and knowledge assets and how it manages its information technology. It also addresses how your organization reviews its performance and uses these reviews to improve its performance. 4.1 Measurement, Analysis, and Improvement of Organizational Performance asks “How do you measure, analyze, and then improve organizational performance?” It covers your performance data and information at all levels and in all parts of the organization. This Item also emphasizes the purpose and use of the results of analyses and reviews, including using them to make strategic decisions for your organization. 4.2 Management of Information, Knowledge, and Information Technology asks “How do you manage your information, organizational knowledge, and information technology?” It addresses the availability and quality of needed data, information, hardware, and software for your workforce, suppliers, partners, collaborators, and customers. It also examines how your organization builds and manages its knowledge assets and the continued availability of data, information, hardware, and software in the event of an emergency.
  • Category 5 (Workforce Focus) addresses how your organization engages, manages, and develops your workforce to utilize its full potential in alignment with the organization’s overall mission, strategy, and action plans. It also examines your organization’s ability to assess workforce capability and capacity needs and to build a workforce environment conducive to high performance. 5.1 Workforce Engagement asks “How do you engage your workforce to achieve organizational and personal success?” It examines how your organization engages, compensates, and rewards your workforce to achieve high performance. It also examines how members of the workforce, including senior leaders, are developed to achieve high performance. In addition, it addresses how your organization assesses workforce engagement and uses the results to achieve higher performance. 5.2 Workforce Environment asks “How do you build an effective and supportive workforce environment?” It addresses how your organization manages workforce capability and capacity to accomplish its work and how it maintains a safe, secure, and supportive work climate.
  • Category 7 (Results) addresses your organization’s performance and improvement in six key areas. It also examines your performance levels relative to those of competitors and other organizations providing similar products and services. This Category includes a specific focus on results related to the effectiveness of your senior leaders. 7.1 Product Outcomes asks “What are your product performance results?” It also asks for segmented results and appropriate comparative data. 7.2 Customer-Focused Outcomes asks “What are your customer-focused performance results?” It examines results for customer satisfaction, dissatisfaction, and engagement.
  • 7.3 Financial and Market Outcomes asks “What are your financial and marketplace performance results?” These results might include aggregate measures of financial return, measures of financial viability or budgetary performance, and measures of marketplace performance, such as market share or position, market or market share growth, and new markets entered. 7.4 Workforce-Focused Outcomes asks “What are your workforce-focused performance results?” It examines results relating to workforce engagement and satisfaction, workforce and leader development, workforce capability and capacity, and the workforce climate. It asks for results that address the diversity of the workforce and the organization’s workforce groups and segments.
  • 7.5 Process Effectiveness Outcomes asks “What are your process effectiveness results?” It examines your key operational performance results that contribute to the achievement of organizational effectiveness, including your organization’s readiness for emergencies. These results address the operational performance of your work systems and key work processes, including productivity and cycle time. 7.6 Leadership Outcomes asks “What are your leadership results?” It examines your organization’s key governance and senior leadership results, including evidence of strategic plan accomplishments, fiscal accountability, legal compliance, ethical behavior, societal responsibility, and support of key communities.
  • These tools also share the concept of continuous improvement. The Baldrige Criteria help you identify areas within your organization that are most ripe for improvement, and continuous improvement is an integral part of the cyclical steps of Lean and Six Sigma. For example, in a Lean environment, you work continuously to identify and eliminate waste-generating processes. In the control stage of a Six Sigma project, you generate and monitor data continuously to identify needs for further improvement.
  • Integrating the Baldrige Criteria and Other Improvement Tools Any organization—no matter its sector or size— can use the Baldrige Criteria as a roadmap for performance excellence. In fact, many organizations begin their improvement efforts by using the Criteria for self-assessment. Through the Baldrige Criteria, you pinpoint strengths and opportunities for improvement, but the Criteria allow you to choose the most suitable tools for carrying out improvements. For example, you might use Baldrige to develop an overall performance map, identify areas for improvement, and track results use Six Sigma, Lean, or other tools to design operations or improve processes

Malcolm baldrige Malcolm baldrige Presentation Transcript

  • Baldrige PerformanceBaldrige PerformanceExcellence ProgramExcellence ProgramBy: MBA, Sajad NazariBy: MBA, Sajad NazariJanus Aries SimbilloJanus Aries Simbillonazary_sajjad@yahoo.comnazary_sajjad@yahoo.com
  • What is the Baldrige Program?What is the Baldrige Program?► Operates as a unique public-private partnershipOperates as a unique public-private partnership► Educates organizations on performanceEducates organizations on performanceexcellence managementexcellence management► Manages the Malcolm Baldrige National QualityManages the Malcolm Baldrige National QualityAwardAwardBaldrige is Performance Excellence: OrganizationsBaldrige is Performance Excellence: OrganizationsAchieve and the U.S. SucceedsAchieve and the U.S. Succeeds
  • PurposePurpose► It enhances the competitiveness, quality, andIt enhances the competitiveness, quality, andproductivity of U.S. organizations for the benefit ofproductivity of U.S. organizations for the benefit ofall citizens.all citizens.► It develops and disseminates evaluation criteriaIt develops and disseminates evaluation criteriaand manages the Malcolm Baldrige Nationaland manages the Malcolm Baldrige NationalQuality Award in close cooperation with the privateQuality Award in close cooperation with the privatesector.sector.► It also provides global leadership inIt also provides global leadership inpromoting performance excellence and in thepromoting performance excellence and in thelearning and sharing of successful performancelearning and sharing of successful performancepractices, principles, and strategies.practices, principles, and strategies.
  • HistoryHistoryThe Malcolm Baldrige National Quality ImprovementThe Malcolm Baldrige National Quality ImprovementAct of 1987, Public Law 100-107Act of 1987, Public Law 100-107► Created Award Program toCreated Award Program to identify/recognize role-model businessesidentify/recognize role-model businesses establish criteria for evaluating improvement effortsestablish criteria for evaluating improvement efforts disseminate/share best practicesdisseminate/share best practices► Expanded to health care and education (1998)Expanded to health care and education (1998)► Expanded to nonprofit (+ Government) sector –Expanded to nonprofit (+ Government) sector –(2005)(2005)
  • The Man BehindThe Man Behind► Howard Malcolm Baldrige, Jr. (October 4, 1922 – July 25, 1987) was theHoward Malcolm Baldrige, Jr. (October 4, 1922 – July 25, 1987) was the26th United States Secretary of Commerce.26th United States Secretary of Commerce.► During his tenure, Baldrige played a major role in developing and carrying outDuring his tenure, Baldrige played a major role in developing and carrying outAdministration trade policy.Administration trade policy.► He took the lead in resolving difficulties in technology transfersHe took the lead in resolving difficulties in technology transferswith China and India.with China and India.► He held the first Cabinet-level talks with the Soviet Union in seven years whichHe held the first Cabinet-level talks with the Soviet Union in seven years whichpaved the way for increased access for U.S. firms to the Soviet market.paved the way for increased access for U.S. firms to the Soviet market.► Leading the Administrations effort to pass the Export Trading Company Act ofLeading the Administrations effort to pass the Export Trading Company Act of1982, Baldrige was named by the President to chair a Cabinet-level Trade Strike1982, Baldrige was named by the President to chair a Cabinet-level Trade StrikeForce to search out unfair trading practices and recommend ways to end thoseForce to search out unfair trading practices and recommend ways to end thosepractices.practices.► Baldriges award-winning managerial excellence contributed to long-termBaldriges award-winning managerial excellence contributed to long-termimprovement in economy, efficiency, and effectiveness in government. Withinimprovement in economy, efficiency, and effectiveness in government. Withinthe Commerce Department, Baldrige reduced the budget by more than 30% andthe Commerce Department, Baldrige reduced the budget by more than 30% andadministrative personnel by 25%.administrative personnel by 25%.► Baldrige died July 25, 1987, in John Muir Hospital, Walnut Creek, California,Baldrige died July 25, 1987, in John Muir Hospital, Walnut Creek, California,after a rodeo accident in Brentwood, Contra Costa County, in Northernafter a rodeo accident in Brentwood, Contra Costa County, in NorthernCalifornia.California.
  • Performance ExcellencePerformance ExcellenceAn integratedAn integrated approachapproach to organizationalto organizationalperformance management thatperformance management that resultsresults inindelivery of ever-improving value to customersdelivery of ever-improving value to customersand stakeholders, contributing to organizationaland stakeholders, contributing to organizationalsustainabilitysustainabilityimprovement of overall organizationalimprovement of overall organizationaleffectiveness and capabilitieseffectiveness and capabilitiesorganizational and personal learningorganizational and personal learning
  • Program ParticipantsProgram Participants►86 Award recipients (91 Awards)86 Award recipients (91 Awards)►1,458 Baldrige Award applications1,458 Baldrige Award applications►More than 5,800 trained ExaminersMore than 5,800 trained Examiners►Widespread participationWidespread participation►Private-sector contributions providePrivate-sector contributions provideover 90 percent of Program supportover 90 percent of Program support
  • Award Recipients’ ContributionsAward Recipients’ Contributions►Increase competitiveness of U.S.Increase competitiveness of U.S.organizationsorganizations►Give presentations to all sectorsGive presentations to all sectors►Give presentations at The Quest forGive presentations at The Quest forExcellence® and the regional conferencesExcellence® and the regional conferences►Influence customers/suppliersInfluence customers/suppliers►Host seminars and workshopsHost seminars and workshops►Write articlesWrite articles
  • Applying for the Baldrige AwardApplying for the Baldrige Award►ManufacturingManufacturing►ServiceService►Small business (manufacturing or service)Small business (manufacturing or service)►Education (for-profit and nonprofit)Education (for-profit and nonprofit)►Health care (for-profit and nonprofit)Health care (for-profit and nonprofit)►Nonprofit, including charities andNonprofit, including charities andgovernment agenciesgovernment agencies
  • The Baldrige CriteriaThe Baldrige Criteria► Are considered a validated organizational performance assessmentAre considered a validated organizational performance assessmenttooltool► Define performance excellenceDefine performance excellence► Are used to identify Award recipientsAre used to identify Award recipients► Are used by diverse organizations in all sectors of the U.S. economyAre used by diverse organizations in all sectors of the U.S. economy► Comprise an Organizational Profile and seven Categories—anComprise an Organizational Profile and seven Categories—anintegrated management frameworkintegrated management framework► Are updated regularly (currently every two years)Are updated regularly (currently every two years)
  • Seven Categories of theSeven Categories of theBusiness/Nonprofit CriteriaBusiness/Nonprofit Criteria►LeadershipLeadership►Strategic PlanningStrategic Planning►Customer FocusCustomer Focus►Measurement, Analysis, and KnowledgeMeasurement, Analysis, and KnowledgeManagementManagement►Workforce FocusWorkforce Focus►Process ManagementProcess Management►ResultsResults
  • Core Values and ConceptsCore Values and Concepts► Visionary LeadershipVisionary Leadership An organization’s senior leaders have a central role inAn organization’s senior leaders have a central role insetting directions and creating a customer focus. Theysetting directions and creating a customer focus. Theymust convey clear and visible values and highmust convey clear and visible values and highexpectations.expectations.► Customer-Driven ExcellenceCustomer-Driven Excellence Performance and quality are judged by anPerformance and quality are judged by anorganization’s customers.organization’s customers.► Organizational and Personal LearningOrganizational and Personal Learning Organizational learning refers to continuousOrganizational learning refers to continuousimprovement of existing approaches and significantimprovement of existing approaches and significantchange or innovation, leading to new goals andchange or innovation, leading to new goals andapproaches.approaches.
  • Core Values and ConceptsCore Values and Concepts► Valuing Workforce Members and PartnersValuing Workforce Members and Partners An organization’s success depends increasingly on an engaged workforceAn organization’s success depends increasingly on an engaged workforceand on the diverse backgrounds, knowledge, skills, creativity, andand on the diverse backgrounds, knowledge, skills, creativity, andmotivation of its workforce and partners.motivation of its workforce and partners.► AgilityAgility Success in today’s ever-changing, globally competitive environmentSuccess in today’s ever-changing, globally competitive environmentdemands agility—a capacity for rapid change and flexibility.demands agility—a capacity for rapid change and flexibility.► Focus on the FutureFocus on the Future The pursuit of sustainable growth and sustained performance leadershipThe pursuit of sustainable growth and sustained performance leadershiprequires a strong future orientation and a willingness to make long-termrequires a strong future orientation and a willingness to make long-termcommitments to key stakeholderscommitments to key stakeholders► Managing for InnovationManaging for Innovation Innovation is no longer strictly the purview of research and developmentInnovation is no longer strictly the purview of research and developmentdepartments.departments.
  • Core Values and ConceptsCore Values and Concepts► Management by FactManagement by Fact Performance improvement requires measurement and analysis.Performance improvement requires measurement and analysis.► Societal ResponsibilitySocietal Responsibility Leaders should stress responsibilities to the public, ethical behavior, andLeaders should stress responsibilities to the public, ethical behavior, andthe need to consider societal well-being and benefit, which refers tothe need to consider societal well-being and benefit, which refers toleadership and support—within the limits of an organization’s resources—leadership and support—within the limits of an organization’s resources—of publicly important purposes.of publicly important purposes.► Focus on Results and Creating ValueFocus on Results and Creating Value Results should be used to create and balance value for your keyResults should be used to create and balance value for your keystakeholders.stakeholders.► Systems PerspectiveSystems Perspective A systems perspective means managing the whole organization, as well asA systems perspective means managing the whole organization, as well asits key processes, to achieve results—and strive for performanceits key processes, to achieve results—and strive for performanceexcellence.excellence.
  • Baldrige Criteria Framework:Baldrige Criteria Framework:A Systems PerspectiveA Systems Perspective
  • Steps Toward MatureSteps Toward MatureProcessesProcesses
  • Organizational ProfileOrganizational ProfileP.1 Organizational DescriptionP.1 Organizational DescriptionP.2 Organizational SituationP.2 Organizational Situation►Starting point for self-assessment andStarting point for self-assessment andapplication preparationapplication preparation►Basis for early action planningBasis for early action planning
  • Category Point ValuesCategory Point Values11 LeadershipLeadership 12012022 Strategic PlanningStrategic Planning 858533 Customer FocusCustomer Focus 858544 Measurement, Analysis, andMeasurement, Analysis, andKnowledge ManagementKnowledge Management 909055 Workforce FocusWorkforce Focus 858566 Process ManagementProcess Management 858577 ResultsResults 450450TOTAL POINTSTOTAL POINTS 1,0001,000
  • 1. Leadership (120 pts.)1. Leadership (120 pts.)Addresses Senior Leaders’ Actions, Governance, and SocietalAddresses Senior Leaders’ Actions, Governance, and SocietalResponsibilitiesResponsibilities► 1.1 Senior Leadership (70 pts.)1.1 Senior Leadership (70 pts.) Asks “How do your senior leaders lead?”Asks “How do your senior leaders lead?” ItIt focuses on how senior leaders set organizational vision and values;focuses on how senior leaders set organizational vision and values;create an environment that fosters, requires, and results in legal and ethicalcreate an environment that fosters, requires, and results in legal and ethicalbehavior; create a sustainable organization; and create an environment forbehavior; create a sustainable organization; and create an environment fororganizational improvement.organizational improvement.► 1.2 Governance and Societal Responsibilities1.2 Governance and Societal Responsibilities(50 pts.)(50 pts.) Asks “How do you govern and fulfill your societal responsibilities?”Asks “How do you govern and fulfill your societal responsibilities?” It examines several key aspects of your organization’s governance systemIt examines several key aspects of your organization’s governance systemand approach to leadership.and approach to leadership.
  • 2. Strategic Planning (85 pts.)2. Strategic Planning (85 pts.)Addresses Strategic and Action Planning andAddresses Strategic and Action Planning andDeployment of PlansDeployment of Plans► 2.1 Strategy Development (40 pts.)2.1 Strategy Development (40 pts.) Asks “How do you develop your strategy?”Asks “How do you develop your strategy?” It examines how your organization establishes its strategy toIt examines how your organization establishes its strategy toaddress its strategic objectives and leverage its strategicaddress its strategic objectives and leverage its strategicadvantages.advantages.► 2.2 Strategy Implementation (45 pts.)2.2 Strategy Implementation (45 pts.) Asks “How do you deploy your strategy?”Asks “How do you deploy your strategy?” It examines how your organization converts its strategic objectivesIt examines how your organization converts its strategic objectivesinto action plans to accomplish these objectives and how it deploysinto action plans to accomplish these objectives and how it deploysand assesses progress on its action plans.and assesses progress on its action plans.
  • 3.Customer Focus (85 pts.)3.Customer Focus (85 pts.)Addresses How an Organization EngagesAddresses How an Organization Engagesits Customers and Listens to theits Customers and Listens to theVoice of the CustomerVoice of the Customer► 3.1 Voice of the Customer (45 pts.)3.1 Voice of the Customer (45 pts.) Asks “How do you engage customers to serve their needsAsks “How do you engage customers to serve their needsand build relationships?”and build relationships?” It asks how your organization determines product offeringsIt asks how your organization determines product offeringsand mechanisms to support customers’ use of your products.and mechanisms to support customers’ use of your products.► 3.2 Customer Engagement (40 pts.)3.2 Customer Engagement (40 pts.) Asks “How do you obtain and use information from yourAsks “How do you obtain and use information from yourcustomers?”customers?” It examines how your organization listens to its customers,It examines how your organization listens to its customers,acquires satisfaction and dissatisfaction information, andacquires satisfaction and dissatisfaction information, anduses customer information to improve its marketplaceuses customer information to improve its marketplacesuccess.success.
  • 4. Measurement, Analysis, and4. Measurement, Analysis, andKnowledge Management (90Knowledge Management (90pts.)pts.)Addresses Analysis, Review, and Improvement ofAddresses Analysis, Review, and Improvement ofOrganizational Performance and Management of Data,Organizational Performance and Management of Data,Knowledge, and Information ResourcesKnowledge, and Information Resources► 4.1 Measurement, Analysis, and Improvement of4.1 Measurement, Analysis, and Improvement ofOrganizational Performance (45 pts.)Organizational Performance (45 pts.) Asks “How do you measure, analyze, and then improve organizationalAsks “How do you measure, analyze, and then improve organizationalperformance?”performance?” It covers your performance data and information at all levels and in allIt covers your performance data and information at all levels and in allparts of the organization.parts of the organization.► 4.2 Management of Information, Knowledge, and4.2 Management of Information, Knowledge, andInformation Technology (45 pts.)Information Technology (45 pts.) Asks “How do you manage your information, organizational knowledge,Asks “How do you manage your information, organizational knowledge,and information technology?”and information technology?” It addresses the availability and quality of needed data, information,It addresses the availability and quality of needed data, information,hardware, and software for your workforce, suppliers, partners,hardware, and software for your workforce, suppliers, partners,collaborators, and customers.collaborators, and customers.
  • 5. Workforce Focus (855. Workforce Focus (85pts.)pts.)Addresses How an Organization Engages,Addresses How an Organization Engages,Develops, and Manages Its Workforce and BuildsDevelops, and Manages Its Workforce and Buildsan Effective Workforce Environmentan Effective Workforce Environment► 5.1 Workforce Environment (40 pts.)5.1 Workforce Environment (40 pts.) Asks “How do you engage your workforce to achieve organizationalAsks “How do you engage your workforce to achieve organizationaland personal success?”and personal success?” It examines how your organization engages, compensates, andIt examines how your organization engages, compensates, andrewards your workforce to achieve high performance.rewards your workforce to achieve high performance.► 5.2 Workforce Engagement (45 pts.)5.2 Workforce Engagement (45 pts.) Asks “How do you build an effective and supportive workforceAsks “How do you build an effective and supportive workforceenvironment?”environment?” It addresses how your organization manages workforce capabilityIt addresses how your organization manages workforce capabilityand capacity to accomplish its work and how it maintains a safe,and capacity to accomplish its work and how it maintains a safe,secure, and supportive work climate.secure, and supportive work climate.
  • 6. Process Management (856. Process Management (85pts.)pts.)Addresses How an Organization Designs Its Work Systems;Addresses How an Organization Designs Its Work Systems;Prepares for Emergencies; and Designs, Manages, andPrepares for Emergencies; and Designs, Manages, andImproves Its Work ProcessesImproves Its Work Processes► 6.1 Work Systems (45 pts.)6.1 Work Systems (45 pts.) Asks “How do you design your work systems?”Asks “How do you design your work systems?” It addresses how your organization designs its work systems andIt addresses how your organization designs its work systems anddetermines its key processes to deliver customer value, prepare fordetermines its key processes to deliver customer value, prepare forpotential emergencies, and achieve organizational success andpotential emergencies, and achieve organizational success andsustainability.sustainability.► 6.2 Work Processes (40 pts.)6.2 Work Processes (40 pts.) Asks “How do you design, manage, and improve your keyAsks “How do you design, manage, and improve your keyorganizational work processes?”organizational work processes?” It examines how your organization designs, implements, manages, andIt examines how your organization designs, implements, manages, andimproves its key work processes to deliver customer value and achieveimproves its key work processes to deliver customer value and achieveorganizational success and sustainability.organizational success and sustainability.
  • 7. Results (450 pts.)7. Results (450 pts.)Addresses an Organization’s PerformanceAddresses an Organization’s Performanceand Improvement in Key Areas and Includesand Improvement in Key Areas and IncludesCurrent Performance Levels, Trends, andCurrent Performance Levels, Trends, andComparative DataComparative Data► 7.1 Product and Process Outcomes (100 pts.)7.1 Product and Process Outcomes (100 pts.) Asks “What are your product performance results?”Asks “What are your product performance results?” It also asks for segmented results and appropriate comparativeIt also asks for segmented results and appropriate comparativedata.data.► 7.2 Customer-Focused Outcomes (90 pts.)7.2 Customer-Focused Outcomes (90 pts.) asks “What are your customer-focused performance results?”asks “What are your customer-focused performance results?” It examines results for customer satisfaction, dissatisfaction, andIt examines results for customer satisfaction, dissatisfaction, andengagement.engagement.
  • 7. Results (450 pts.)7. Results (450 pts.)► 7.3 Financial and Market Outcomes (80 pts.)7.3 Financial and Market Outcomes (80 pts.) Asks “What are your financial and marketplace performanceAsks “What are your financial and marketplace performanceresults?”results?” These results might include aggregate measures of financial return,These results might include aggregate measures of financial return,measures of financial viability or budgetary performance, andmeasures of financial viability or budgetary performance, andmeasures of marketplace performance, such as market share ormeasures of marketplace performance, such as market share orposition, market or market share growth, and new markets entered.position, market or market share growth, and new markets entered.► 7.4 Workforce-Focused Outcomes (80 pts.)7.4 Workforce-Focused Outcomes (80 pts.) Asks “What are your workforce-focused performance results?”Asks “What are your workforce-focused performance results?” It examines results relating to workforce engagement andIt examines results relating to workforce engagement andsatisfaction, workforce and leader development, workforcesatisfaction, workforce and leader development, workforcecapability and capacity, and the workforce climate.capability and capacity, and the workforce climate.
  • 7. Results (450 pts.)7. Results (450 pts.)► 7.5 Process Effectiveness Outcomes (20 pts.)7.5 Process Effectiveness Outcomes (20 pts.) Asks “What are your process effectiveness results?”Asks “What are your process effectiveness results?” It examines your key operational performance results thatIt examines your key operational performance results thatcontribute to the achievement of organizational effectiveness,contribute to the achievement of organizational effectiveness,including your organization’s readiness for emergencies.including your organization’s readiness for emergencies.► 7.6 Leadership and Governance Outcomes (80 pts.)7.6 Leadership and Governance Outcomes (80 pts.) Asks “What are your leadership results?”Asks “What are your leadership results?” It examines your organization’s key governance and seniorIt examines your organization’s key governance and seniorleadership results, including evidence of strategic planleadership results, including evidence of strategic planaccomplishments, fiscal accountability, legal compliance, ethicalaccomplishments, fiscal accountability, legal compliance, ethicalbehavior, societal responsibility, and support of key communities.behavior, societal responsibility, and support of key communities.
  • Program AchievementsProgram Achievements►Created a national and internationalCreated a national and internationalstandard for performance excellencestandard for performance excellence►Produced role modelsProduced role models►Shared best management practicesShared best management practices►Generated award programsGenerated award programs►Raised U.S. competitivenessRaised U.S. competitiveness►Established outreach and educationEstablished outreach and educationsystemssystems
  • 2012 Baldrige Award Recipients2012 Baldrige Award Recipients►Lockheed Martin Missiles and FireLockheed Martin Missiles and FireControlControl, Grand Prairie, Texas, Grand Prairie, Texas(manufacturing)(manufacturing)►MESA Products Inc.MESA Products Inc. , Tulsa, Okla. (small, Tulsa, Okla. (smallbusiness)business)►North Mississippi Health ServicesNorth Mississippi Health Services ,,Tupelo, Miss. (health care)Tupelo, Miss. (health care)►City of IrvingCity of Irving , Irving, Texas (nonprofit), Irving, Texas (nonprofit)
  • Improvement ToolsImprovement Tools►These improvement tools areThese improvement tools arecomplementary, not mutually exclusive. Forcomplementary, not mutually exclusive. Forexample, Baldrige, Lean, and Six Sigma allexample, Baldrige, Lean, and Six Sigma all focus on resultsfocus on results use a team approachuse a team approach require management by factrequire management by fact are customer- and market-focusedare customer- and market-focused require strong leadership for  long-termrequire strong leadership for  long-termeffectivenesseffectiveness
  • DifferencesDifferences► the Baldrige Criteria serve as a comprehensivethe Baldrige Criteria serve as a comprehensiveframework for performance excellence. They focusframework for performance excellence. They focuson business results as well as organizationalon business results as well as organizationalimprovement and innovation improvement and innovation systemssystems..► Lean and Six Sigma methodologies drive wasteLean and Six Sigma methodologies drive wasteand inefficiencies out of and inefficiencies out of processes.processes.► ISO 9000 is a series ofISO 9000 is a series of standardsstandards for an efficient for an efficientquality conformance system.quality conformance system.► Overall, ISO 9000 registration covers less than 10Overall, ISO 9000 registration covers less than 10percent of the Baldrige Criteria.percent of the Baldrige Criteria.
  • Integration of the Baldrige CriteriaIntegration of the Baldrige Criteriaand Other Improvement Toolsand Other Improvement Tools►use Baldrige to develop an overalluse Baldrige to develop an overallperformance map, identify areas forperformance map, identify areas forimprovement, and track resultsimprovement, and track results►use Six Sigma, Lean, or other tools touse Six Sigma, Lean, or other tools todesign operations or improve processesdesign operations or improve processes
  • “Dont lower your expectations to meet your performance. Raise yourlevel of performance to meet your expectations. Expect the best ofyourself, and then do what is necessary to make it a reality.”Ralph Marston