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Reading the Next Book
Reading the Next Book
Reading the Next Book
Reading the Next Book
Reading the Next Book
Reading the Next Book
Reading the Next Book
Reading the Next Book
Reading the Next Book
Reading the Next Book
Reading the Next Book
Reading the Next Book
Reading the Next Book
Reading the Next Book
Reading the Next Book
Reading the Next Book
Reading the Next Book
Reading the Next Book
Reading the Next Book
Reading the Next Book
Reading the Next Book
Reading the Next Book
Reading the Next Book
Reading the Next Book
Reading the Next Book
Reading the Next Book
Reading the Next Book
Reading the Next Book
Reading the Next Book
Reading the Next Book
Reading the Next Book
Reading the Next Book
Reading the Next Book
Reading the Next Book
Reading the Next Book
Reading the Next Book
Reading the Next Book
Reading the Next Book
Reading the Next Book
Reading the Next Book
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Reading the Next Book

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Moving books onto the network and the ramifications for how we define reading, and our privacy.

Moving books onto the network and the ramifications for how we define reading, and our privacy.

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  • 1. Reading the Next Book Peter Brantley Sept/Oct 2007 DLF
  • 2.
    • “ a book is a machine to think with.”
    • I. A. Richards
    • Principles of Literary Criticism
    • 1924
  • 3.
    • the book is a social construction —
    • a very successful commodity form
    • that is a
    • physical representation of content
    • that has been
    • remarkably successful for almost all
    • modern-era human cultures
  • 4.
    • reading, then, is a social product :
    • a combination of a commodity artifact
    • (i.e., the book as a physical object),
    • the way human language works,
    • an understanding of space, quiet.
  • 5.
    • analog culture is being uplifted to digital
    • ... and so ...
    • what is a “book”
    • is being wholly redefined
    • into a new kind of commodity
    • — and so then also is “reading”
    • being wholly redefined, subtly.
  • 6.
    • reading [ to oneself ]
    • was once the epitome
    • of a solitary act,
    • but
    • now reading, as a product,
    • is becoming a social act,
    • woven into the network fabric.
  • 7.
    • the transition is imminent
    • (but implied)
    • by the increasing digitization
    • of text production
  • 8.
    • books are morphing into digital
    • through two different paths:
      • digital production of the new
      • scanning of the old
  • 9.
    • direct digital production
    • (by publishers)
    • attractive cost savings over time
    • but complex, expensive to implement
    • therefore often a slow transition
  • 10.
    • scanning printed material :
    • a) externally - Goog, Msft, Ingram
    • ( content > external party control)
    • b) internally - publisher initiated
    • ( content > internal group control)
  • 11.
    • access modes are split in Twain:
    • Old : package format
    • (bin w/drm: legacy ebook)
    • 
    • New : network access
    • (reflowable text/html: IDPF epub)
  • 12.
    • advantage adheres to -
    • text/html + network access
  • 13.
    • text/html advantages:
    • native media easier to maintain than binary
    • user enrichment is straightforward (on/off)
    • content can be redrawn by the user
    • easy accessibility = support for blind
    • device-independent, adaptive re-formatting
    • text is less demanding of hardware
  • 14.
    • network advantages
    • print on demand
    • social - sharing, recommending, rating
    • content enhancement (georef, temporal)
    • licensing revenue attractive (vs purchase)
    • highly granular usage data aggregation
    • local caching with sync straightforward
    • constant content updates through push
    • greater account storage available
  • 15.
    • and Google .... ?
    • Google presents page images
    • Text-copy support is limited.
    • GOOG does not currently support “.epub”.
    • ( but they could at the very least for PD text)
    • Eventual conflicts with Ingram and Amazon are likely for the future discovery of content.
  • 16.
    • How do users pay
    • for digital services?
    • “ Show me the money!!”
  • 17.
    • public domain might be free
    • that is a social responsibility
    • > we must make it happen <
    • everyone benefits through access
    • the rest will be paid, somehow
  • 18.
    • revenue models :
    • advertising-supported
    • - or -
    • expect PPV for individuals
    • licensing for organization/enterprise
  • 19.
    • what can’t easily generate revenue
    • is the broad class of “orphan works”:
    • not obviously in public domain
    • could be in-copyright
    • probably out of print
    • rights holder is uncertain
  • 20.
    • if Google settles with publishers ...
    • for in-copyright, out of print books
    • expect a licensing scheme
    • (voluntary collective licensing)
    • revenue sharing between
    • publishers and Google
  • 21.
    • library books
    • digitized
    • by Google
    • then resold
    • by Google
    • licensed
    • by libraries
  • 22. all online models are a mixed blessing particularly for reading !! “ Architecture is politics ... ” - Mitch Kapor
  • 23.
    • PRIVACY
  • 24.
    • in the digital world
    • privacy does not inherently exist
    • it must be explicitly designed for.
    • & because engineering is expensive
    • user control of information may be
    • the rarest artifact on the network.
  • 25.
    • if we should not be careful
    • privacy
    • becomes a corporate commodity
    • (not even a public commodity)
    • negotiable for purchase
  • 26.
    • libraries had protected
    • and still protect
    • in their contracts
    • but agglomeration of information
    • will certainly only increase with time
    • and the power of awareness with it
  • 27.
    • StreetView
    • capture pictures of people
    • on the street, in shops, in homes
    • is this a privacy violation?
  • 28.
    • Canada's Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act, which went into effect on January 1, 2004.
    • Street View &quot;does not appear to meet the basic requirements of knowledge, consent, and limited collection and use as set out in the legislation.&quot;
      • Canadian privacy commissioner,
      • letter to Google, Sept 2007
  • 29.
    • &quot;We would launch Street View in Canada in keeping with the principles and requirements of Canadian law ... we'll have to focus on finding ways to make sure that individual's faces are not identifiable in pictures taken in Canada and that license plate numbers are not identifiable in Canada.”
    • -- Peter Fleischer,
    • Google's global privacy counsel
  • 30. the majority of network data collection is invisible to the user.
    • my mobile phone service provider:
    • / knows where I am
    • / who I talk to
    • / when I talk to them
    • / who my friends are
  • 31.
    • the down
    • s
    • i
    • d
    • e
    • life experience is recorded
    • information use is tracked,
    • advantage adheres to those
    • who insert dams to pool events
    • within the flow of information
  • 32.
    • accepting loss of privacy
    • with an ability to opt-out
    • yields an enhanced product offering
  • 33.
    • privacy issue is not dissimilar
    • from copyright
    • Google Book Search
    • Google digitizes copyrighted material
    • provides an innovative useful service
    • and there is an opt-out option
  • 34.
    • Both are appropriations
    • (without any apology)
    • (with givebacks upon request)
    • that
    • enable
    • useful services.
  • 35.
    • [Information flow]
    • (on-line)
    • things people >>
    • do
    • >> corporations >>
    • >> governments >>
    • ??
  • 36.
    • how well, really,
    • do national governments
    • actually control
    • corporations?
    • and
    • what is the relation of
    • people to government?
  • 37.
    • and therefore the relation of
    • people to their identity
    • people to their privacy
    • people to their rights
  • 38.
    • as reading becomes a
    • social act
    • embedded within
    • the network
  • 39.
    • all this is present
    • in how we decide
    • >> together <<
    • to shape reading --
    • with our new books
  • 40.
    • contact info:
    • email: peter at diglib org
    • thanks !

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