Renewable Energy Workshop: Renewables Development Transmission Overview
 

Renewable Energy Workshop: Renewables Development Transmission Overview

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Navigant’s renewable energy experts held a pre-conference technical training session on May 5, 2014 prior to WINDPOWER 2014 in Las Vegas, NV. ...

Navigant’s renewable energy experts held a pre-conference technical training session on May 5, 2014 prior to WINDPOWER 2014 in Las Vegas, NV.

Dwayne Stradford
Associate Director, Navigant
Presentation: Renewables Development Transmission Overview

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Renewable Energy Workshop: Renewables Development Transmission Overview Renewable Energy Workshop: Renewables Development Transmission Overview Presentation Transcript

  • ©2014 Navigant Consulting, Inc. DISPUTES & INVESTIGATIONS • ECONOMICS • FINANCIAL ADVISORY • MANAGEMENT CONSULTING Renewables Development Transmission Overview AWEA WINDPOWER 2014 AWEA Renewable Energy Workshop Las Vegas, NV Dwayne Stradford | Associate Director, Energy Practice May 5, 2014
  • 1©2014 Navigant Consulting, Inc. Confidential and proprietary. Do not distribute or copy. 1©2014 Navigant Consulting, Inc. Agenda • Learning from Past History • Points to Consider in Future Development • Conclusions and Wrap Up
  • 2©2014 Navigant Consulting, Inc. Learning from Past History During the gas-fired plant rush of the late 90’s and early 2000’s, developers typically locked up sites using a strategy of finding a large electric power line crossing a major gas pipeline. This Velocity Suites map shows an overlay of gas lines and power lines near Mead Station (South of Las Vegas, NV).
  • 3©2014 Navigant Consulting, Inc. » However, transmission interconnection studies must be performed in order to determine a project’s viability on the grid » The process typically starts with a feasibility screening to see how large of a power injection that a point of interconnection site can withstand » Based upon the initial screening results, a decision is made whether or not to move forward with a deeper transmission study – Facility Study (FS) determines the additional infrastructure that is required for the project to be constructed and placed in service – System Impact Study (SIS) o Dynamic Stability Analysis would be a more involved study and looking at the site’s stability in relationship with surrounding facilities o Short Circuit Analysis involves studying the ability of surrounding equipment to safely operate under fault conditions and system normal » These detailed interconnection studies may reveal that the developer must spend additional cash on the nearby transmission network to accommodate the entire output capacity – New conductor, new circuit breakers, updated relaying schemes, etc. Learning from Past History
  • 4©2014 Navigant Consulting, Inc. Points to Consider in Future Development However, these transmission locations may not be ideal for injecting power into the system due to: • Expense to build an entirely new tap station off of a high voltage circuit (greater than 200 kV) • No availability to build a generation interconnection circuit into an existing station o Location is not optimal due to existing transmission constraints or lack of available transmission capacity at the proposed point of interconnection Point of Interconnection Renewables should be located where the resources are ideal • Similar to gas power plants, renewable facilities should be located where the solar and wind resources are optimal, in conjunction with available transmission in the vicinity Location
  • 5©2014 Navigant Consulting, Inc. Points to Consider in Future Development Connecting new projects to the grid • On the load side of a known flow gate or interface • Within the transmission source boundaries of a load center • Stable locations with strong voltage profile and reactive capability o Alleviate the stress of maintaining a power factor and/or voltage schedule at the interconnection point Strategy
  • 6©2014 Navigant Consulting, Inc. Points to Consider in Future Development Flow Gate Example in PJM’s Operating Footprint (Kanawha – Matt Funk 345 kV for the loss of Baker – Broadford 765 kV) Kanawha – Matt Funk 345-kV Circuit Baker – Broadford 765-kV Circuit Power flows from west to east Optimal location on this side of the interface to interconnect a facility Considered the load side of the flow gate
  • 7©2014 Navigant Consulting, Inc. Points to Consider in Future Development With more utility size projects coming online, having all NERC reliability compliance policies and procedures in place prior to commercial operation is crucial • Setting up methodologies to capture NERC evidence automatically, e.g., VAR-002 (R2), to maintain voltage and/or reactive limits per the Transmission Operator • Financial penalties for noncompliance Main issues to be aware of from a NERC perspective • VAR standards - maintaining the appropriate power factor range and/or voltage schedule • IRO and TOP Standards – following Directives from the Transmission Operator and Reliability Coordinator NERC Reliability Areas with a good transmission operating history • Research the amount of outages a facility has experienced over the past five to ten years with reasons behind the operations o A circuit that is typically in service is a good place to interconnect a project Operating History
  • 8©2014 Navigant Consulting, Inc. Conclusions and Wrap-up » Preliminary screening of the system to coincide with the ideal locations for renewable output/energy production – Be willing to look at slightly less optimal development sites » Transmission reliability and NERC Reliability Compliance are two major components to consider after commercial operation of the new facility – Establishing connectivity to the grid while avoiding chance of renewable facility being curtailed – Avoidance of punitive financial penalties for noncompliance A future consideration - the renewable energy industry assuming more responsibility for their own mitigation measures – Due to the volatile nature of solar and wind, seek to be more innovative and self- sufficient when it comes to minimizing the electrical impact on the surrounding system – With impending retirements of coal and nuclear assets, seek to collaborate with other projects to use these retiring assets as a socialized asset
  • Key C O N T A C T S ©2010 Navigant Consulting, Inc. Confidential and proprietary. Do not distribute or copy. Key C O N T A C T S ©2010 Navigant Consulting, Inc. Confidential and proprietary. Do not distribute or copy. Key C O N T A C T S ©2010 Navigant Consulting, Inc. Confidential and proprietary. Do not distribute or copy. Key C O N T A C T S ©2014 Navigant Consulting, Inc. Confidential and proprietary. Do not distribute or copy. 9 Dwayne Stradford | Associate Director dwayne.stradford@navigant.com 202.481-8347 direct