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Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large
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Mount Cross: Naturalists at Large

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Custom outdoor education trips for your school.

Custom outdoor education trips for your school.

Published in: Education, Technology
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  • 1. Who do we serve ?Our education programsfor over two hundred ofCalifornias public andindependent schools haveintroduced thousands ofstudents to environmentsas diverse as the…
  • 2. Pygmy Forest of Sonoma Catalina Island Giant Forest of Sequoia Sonoran Desert Colorado River
  • 3. What doesNaturalists at Large do ?
  • 4. We work with eachschool every stepof the way toidentify theiroutdoor educationgoals and thentailor a program tomeet those specificneeds.
  • 5. Trail Group sizes of 9 to 14 students Always with one instructor and one adult from your school
  • 6. Naturalists at Largeprovides a complete outdoor curriculumfor primary through high school level students. We can accommodate trips for 15 students to over 200.
  • 7. Naturalists at Large draws it’s instructorsfrom all over the United States. These aremen and women with 4-year universitydegrees who have proven experienceworking with youth in the outdoors and inthe classroom.
  • 8. With their high comfort and experience inthe outdoors, their passion for teaching,and a commitment to safety first, we havethe foundation for a fantastic experiencefor you and your students.
  • 9. All of our instructors are CPR and WildernessFirst Aid Certified. 80 % of them holdadvanced certifications such as WildernessEmergency Medical Training, Wilderness FirstResponders and Wilderness Advanced FirstAid.RESPONSE TIMES: for Emergency ServicesAmbulance: 5-7 minutesMedivac Helicopter: availableLaw Enforcement: 5 minutes
  • 10. Join us at...
  • 11. MountCrossCamp
  • 12. 20minutesnorth of SantaCruz onhighway 9.
  • 13. Welcome !
  • 14. The camp features challengecourses, playing fields, aswimming pool, modern well keptaccommodations, and wholesomemeals. A variety of programs canbe put together using theseelements. Students can do theropes course and climbing wall inaddition to outdoor andenvironmental education.
  • 15. Located in the Coastal RedwoodForest of the Santa Cruz Mountains
  • 16. Take a close up view of theSanta Cruz MountainsExperience, which can beprovided by Naturalists atLarge for you and yourstudents.
  • 17. Mount Cross and the CoastalRedwood Forest are awonderful backdrop for thestudy of Redwood Ecology,Environmental Science andthe development of classunity through challengingactivity.
  • 18. Dine beneath towering redwoods.
  • 19. We will have plenty of foodwaiting for you.
  • 20. Meals are wholesome affairs providing the nutritionThere’s a variety of menu needed for activeoptions from which to choose participants
  • 21. Allergies and Special Food Needs Program meals offer vegetarian food options. For those with specific needs due to allergies or personal reasons, we suggest discussion with your faculty. Naturalists at Large can help guide those with special diets to supplement their meals in ways which everyone can most easily manage.
  • 22. There are some choices in lodging at Mount Cross. Madrone Cabins are a circle of seven, single-room, heated cabins. There is a men’s and women’s restroom/shower building located in the center. Each cabin has five bunk beds to accommodate up to ten people.
  • 23. The lodge has semi-private rooms varying in size accommodating 1-4 persons, shared restrooms and showers, a central meeting area for 20 -25 people, and a kitchenette.The dorm has twofaculty rooms on eachside, as well asrestroom and showerfacilities in the middleof the dorm. Each roomhas either six or sevenbunk beds.
  • 24. You will walk, play andlearn among…majestic redwoods andrefreshing streams.
  • 25. Small Groups of 10-14students and 2 adults
  • 26. Group Challenges
  • 27. The low elementsof the courseinclude the WildWoosey, SpidersWeb, The Wall,Islands, a TrustFall, and NitroCrossing. Initiatives and…
  • 28. ProblemSolving
  • 29. The Naturalists at Largeropes program is designedto introduce all studentsto this exciting activity.Students learn to worktogether and cooperatetowards a common goal.Ropes instruction iscomplemented bychallenge and initiativegames that will fostergreater group interaction.
  • 30. The high-ropes course at Mt. Cross consists ofa Burma Bridge, a Catwalk, a Multi-VineTraverse, a Trapeze Leap, a Giants Ladder,Islands in the Sky, and a Tube Net.
  • 31. Lessons learned includetrust in fellow students,increased ability tofocus, and developmentof self-esteem. The fewclimbing skills acquiredby the students focuson a safe and successfulexperience. Theorganization of groundschool preparation andropes sites are designedwith this philosophy inmind.
  • 32. The new climbing wall is fun and challenging
  • 33. Natural History HikesStudy of human impact on old-growth and second-growth redwoodsIntroduction to environmentalscience conceptsCoastal range natural history andecology
  • 34. Students will discover theunique natural and human historyof the area, develop groupcooperation through sharedexperiences, enhance leadershipabilities, and learn basic outdoorskills. Naturalists at Largeprograms are designed to givethe students a "sense of place". This is accomplished by introducing them to the natural and cultural history of the surrounding area while they explore the trails and study the various habitats.
  • 35. Journaling Plant Identification
  • 36. WildlifeObservation
  • 37. Stream Study
  • 38. The Mount Cross Camp is a fully selfcontained site with a variety of hiking trails,a year round stream and all camp facilitiesnestled within it’s own private land.
  • 39. SeasonalSwimming Pool
  • 40. RecreationAreas
  • 41. Students are constantlyencouraged to solve problemsposed by the Naturalists atLarge instructors, comprisedof both intellectual problemsand well thought-out and wellexecuted physical problems(i.e. initiative activities). Eachtrail group is with a Naturalistsat Large naturalist-instructor,and a faculty or parentchaperon each day for theentire program.
  • 42. And a few other optional activities… Animal Tracking Map & Compass Orienteering Journal & Reflective Activity
  • 43. Creativity Relaxation & StretchingFun Games
  • 44. And after the sunset,there’s still things to do…
  • 45. Campfire
  • 46. Night Walk
  • 47. Star studies andthe night sky
  • 48. Mount Cross Camp puts you in close proximity to great destinations for optional off-site activities.MontereyAquarium Elkhorn Slough Kayak
  • 49. Point Lobos Punta de Ano NuevoNatural Bridges
  • 50. The following is a sample three-day schedule that has been usedby several schools. Four-day andfive-day trips often add off-siteoptions and allow for a more in-depth experience of the region.All Naturalists at Large trips aretailored to meet each school’soutdoor education goals.
  • 51. (Day one)11:00 Arrive at Mount CrossCamp Bus greeters. Orientation tosite, Staff and Faculty meetingBreak into trail groups / smallgroup orientation andintroductions.12:00 Lunch1:00 Move in to lodging2:00 Begin Initiatives & Challenges6:30 Dinner7:30 Evening Program: Nightawareness and trust activities9:00 Students released to faculty
  • 52. (Day two)7:30 Breakfast9:00 Groups A & B do redwoodecology hike, group initiatives.Groups C & D do low ropes12:00 Lunch by groups1:00 Groups C & D do redwoodecology hike, group initiatives.Groups A & B do low ropes4:30 Return to camp6:00 Dinner7:30 Evening Program: Starstudy / Campfire9:00 Students releasedto faculty
  • 53. (Day three)7:30 Breakfast8:15 Pack8:45 All gear staged andready to load on bus9:00 Groups C & D do streamstudy and games. Groups A &B do high ropes11:30 Lunch by trail groups12:00 Groups A, B do streamstudy and games. Groups C & Ddo high ropes2:30 Return to camp for debrief3:00 Load gear on bus3:30 School departs
  • 54. DISCOVER IT !
  • 55. Ask about… Allergies, Medications, and Special Dietary Needs
  • 56. Equipment RemindersFollow your equipment list.Pack together. Adult and student can doublecheck the contents of the gear bag.All clothing should fit in a medium size duffle.A day pack is essential to move about the programwith water, some food, extra layers of clothing,and personal incidentals.
  • 57. Rain gear is a must. (water-proof shell) RainPonchos are fine.Comfortable closed toed shoes are required.Light weight hikers or tennis shoes with a fewpairs of good outdoor socks (non-cotton).A good water bottle (quart or liter).The proper sleeping bag (check your equipmentlist for specifics).
  • 58. Plastic bag protection. A half dozen, 1 or 2gallon storage ziplocks are good for protectingclothing in a gear bag from moisture. Along witha couple hefty 15 to 30 gallon bags to line yourgear bag and sleeping bag (& daypack).Don’t send gear that you could not afford lostor broken (expensive cameras, cell phones, andother electronics). A handy disposable camerawould be just fine.Follow your equipment list, ask questions,borrow from friends.
  • 59. For more information check us out at …

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