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Cataloguers - adventurers of the library world

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Zine talk presented on the 31st October 2013 at the ALIA National Library & Information Technicians Symposium 2013 held at the National Library of Australia.

Zine talk presented on the 31st October 2013 at the ALIA National Library & Information Technicians Symposium 2013 held at the National Library of Australia.


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  • 1. Cataloguers – adventurers of the library world! Elaine Bulluss & Debbie Cox
  • 2. Zines: what are they and a potted zine history
  • 3. What is a zine? • Name abbreviation of maga{zine} • Underground publications • Small i.e. Usually less than 20 pages • Usually self-published • Non-commercial • Monograph or serial • Be: – About anything – Made by anything
  • 4. Zines “Zines may assume a recognisably magazine derived format (evidencing their etymological origins) or be something else print-based entirely. Zines may be sequential, an ongoing series, or a one off creation”. Eloise Peace (Zine creator)
  • 5. Zinesters • Can be anybody who: – Creates and/or collects zines – And/or runs zine distros • Uncensored creators
  • 6. Eurovision Song Contest Zines
  • 7. Zine distros and events
  • 8. Quick Zine History • Gutenberg Press 1450: pamphlets, chapbooks and tracts = zines?? • 1920’s to 1960’s golden age of the Fanzine • 1970’s alternative music scene, mainly Punk • 1990’s Riot Grrl movement • Late 1990’s death and rebirth • 21st Century: Bio-zines, Perzines and lots more
  • 9. Fanzines
  • 10. Punk/Queer zine Political zine
  • 11. Perzine Art zines
  • 12. Other notable things about zines • Social networks very important • Zine making is a culture • Content ranges from literary to trashy • Production values range from professional to basic • Can aim to provoke • Most zinesters are under 30
  • 13. How zines are treated at the National Library
  • 14. Collecting The NLA: • Does not rely on Legal Deposit to collect zines • Collects a representative range of zines • Has acquired several formed collections of zines
  • 15. Collecting
  • 16. Cataloguing • Each zine is catalogued individually with a full record • Zines often lack many of the most basic publication details i.e. Enumeration, pagination, statements of responsibilities etc. • Our cataloguer’s judgement is exercised regularly
  • 17. Internet resources
  • 18. Internet resources
  • 19. Internet resources and events
  • 20. “Goldfish acid”
  • 21. “1:25pm, City park, under tree. Raining”
  • 22. In-house tools
  • 23. Cataloguing Zines - Other issues • Privacy • Preservation • End processing
  • 24. Preservation
  • 25. No Staples Please!
  • 26. End processing
  • 27. The Fringe Publishing Blog • National Library Blog • Communicating to Zinesters • Advertising zines and other fringe material in our collection
  • 28. “Cyäegha”
  • 29. Zine reading
  • 30. Questions?