Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Swru022008 John Clay2 Re Jeremy Jacobs The Composting Association
Swru022008 John Clay2 Re Jeremy Jacobs The Composting Association
Swru022008 John Clay2 Re Jeremy Jacobs The Composting Association
Swru022008 John Clay2 Re Jeremy Jacobs The Composting Association
Swru022008 John Clay2 Re Jeremy Jacobs The Composting Association
Swru022008 John Clay2 Re Jeremy Jacobs The Composting Association
Swru022008 John Clay2 Re Jeremy Jacobs The Composting Association
Swru022008 John Clay2 Re Jeremy Jacobs The Composting Association
Swru022008 John Clay2 Re Jeremy Jacobs The Composting Association
Swru022008 John Clay2 Re Jeremy Jacobs The Composting Association
Swru022008 John Clay2 Re Jeremy Jacobs The Composting Association
Swru022008 John Clay2 Re Jeremy Jacobs The Composting Association
Swru022008 John Clay2 Re Jeremy Jacobs The Composting Association
Swru022008 John Clay2 Re Jeremy Jacobs The Composting Association
Swru022008 John Clay2 Re Jeremy Jacobs The Composting Association
Swru022008 John Clay2 Re Jeremy Jacobs The Composting Association
Swru022008 John Clay2 Re Jeremy Jacobs The Composting Association
Swru022008 John Clay2 Re Jeremy Jacobs The Composting Association
Swru022008 John Clay2 Re Jeremy Jacobs The Composting Association
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Swru022008 John Clay2 Re Jeremy Jacobs The Composting Association

688

Published on

Jeremy Jacobs - The Composting Association

Jeremy Jacobs - The Composting Association

Published in: Business, News & Politics
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
688
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
18
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • Transcript

    • 1. An overview of biowaste management opportunities Jeremy Jacobs Development Director The Composting Association
    • 2. The Composting Association <ul><li>The Who </li></ul>
    • 3. The WHO <ul><li>UK’s leading not for profit membership organisation which promotes the use of Biological treatment activities. </li></ul><ul><li>Information focal point for all stakeholders involved in biowaste treatment </li></ul><ul><li>Promotes the long term sustainability of the biowaste industry </li></ul>
    • 4. “ Promoting the Sustainable Management of Biodegradable Resources” <ul><li>Information </li></ul><ul><li>Certification schemes </li></ul><ul><li>compost </li></ul><ul><li>compostable packaging </li></ul><ul><li>Conferences & seminars </li></ul>Trade association Broad range of members Proactive policy work Composting News Publications
    • 5.  
    • 6. Composting processes WASTE ORGANIC MATERIALS + £ gate fee SORTING SHREDDING ACTIVE COMPOSTING SCREENING COMPOST + £ product value CURING <ul><li>(By hand; mechanical) </li></ul>Rejects <ul><li>High capacity shredder </li></ul>Introduce oxygen 60 - 70 °C <ul><li>Windrow turner </li></ul><ul><li>Front end loader </li></ul><ul><li>Forced aeration </li></ul><ul><li>In-vessel system </li></ul>“ Maturation phase” Temperature  ambient <ul><li>Trommel, power </li></ul><ul><li>or star screen </li></ul>Rejects
    • 7. © The Composting Association What can be composted ? May be anywhere between 30 - 50 % (w/w) municipal waste suitable for composting } } Some paper & card Garden wastes and kitchen putrescibles (botanical origin) 17% Kitchen waste 18 % Paper 3 % Fines 3 % Textiles 16 % Other 8 % Metal 7 % Glass 7 % Plastics BIODEGRADABLE 20% Garden waste
    • 8. Recycling, Energy & Strategies <ul><li>Waste Strategy for England 2007 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Targets for local authorities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>C&I waste </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Focus on Anaerobic Digestion by DEFRA </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Energy White Paper </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Energy security </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Biomass – possible threat </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Proposed 2 x ROCs and subsidies for AD </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Peak oil” debate </li></ul></ul>
    • 9. UK Composting Industry <ul><ul><ul><li>3.4 million tonnes organic wastes composted in 2005/06 </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>1 million tonnes compost supplied to agriculture </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Main feedstocks and processing types: </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Green waste – open windrow </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Green/food waste – enclosed/in-vessel </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Green waste = 81% of wastes composted in 2005/06 </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Food waste = 12% of wastes composted in 2005/06 </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>National quality standard – BSI PAS 100 & QP </li></ul></ul></ul>
    • 10. Background <ul><li>Sustained growth in composting over last decade </li></ul>
    • 11. Regulations and Industry Standards <ul><ul><ul><li>Regulatory Controls : </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Animal By-Products Regulations – enforced by SVS (now called Animal Health) </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Waste Management Licensing Regulations – enforced by EA/SEPA </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Some sites run under an exemption (volume related) </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Industry standards : </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>BSI PAS 100 and Quality Protocol – audited by independent certification bodies managed by The Composting Association </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Now contracted out to two Certification bodies </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Heavily regulated industry </li></ul></ul></ul>
    • 12. BSI PAS 100: 2005 <ul><li>Developed from Composting Association’s Standards for Compost </li></ul><ul><li>To develop good operational practices </li></ul><ul><li>To provide end-users with minimum product quality assurances </li></ul><ul><li>To help develop sustainable markets </li></ul><ul><li>To specify in contracts with local authorities </li></ul>
    • 13. © The Composting Association Indicative CAPEX Source: Strategy Unit 2002
    • 14. © The Composting Association Large scale composting Open-air turned-windrows
    • 15. IN VESSEL FACILITIES
    • 16. © The Composting Association Some environmental impacts of composting
    • 17. Designated markets Domestic use horticulture Land restoration Agriculture & field horticulture Soil manufacture and blending (Landscape)
    • 18. © The Composting Association Conclusions <ul><li>Composting has many and varied legislative drivers </li></ul><ul><li>Significant additional capacity is required to meet National and Local objectives and targets </li></ul><ul><li>Composting is a rapidly expanding industry </li></ul><ul><li>There are a wide range of existing and developing technologies </li></ul><ul><li>Composting has environmental impacts that can be controlled and mitigated </li></ul><ul><li>Robust markets for quality composts are becoming established </li></ul>
    • 19. Thank you Further information at: www.compost.org.uk

    ×