Jeremy Jacobs Comp Ass 231107 (2)

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  • Jeremy Jacobs Comp Ass 231107 (2)

    1. 1. An overview of biowaste management opportunities Jeremy Jacobs Development Director The Composting Association
    2. 2. The Composting Association <ul><li>The Who </li></ul>
    3. 3. The WHO <ul><li>UK’s leading not for profit membership organisation which promotes the use of Biological treatment activities. </li></ul><ul><li>Information focal point for all stakeholders involved in biowaste treatment </li></ul><ul><li>Promotes the long term sustainability of the biowaste industry </li></ul>
    4. 4. “ Promoting the Sustainable Management of Biodegradable Resources” <ul><li>Information </li></ul><ul><li>Certification schemes </li></ul><ul><li>compost </li></ul><ul><li>compostable packaging </li></ul><ul><li>Conferences & seminars </li></ul>Trade association Broad range of members Proactive policy work Composting News Publications
    5. 6. Composting processes WASTE ORGANIC MATERIALS + £ gate fee SORTING SHREDDING ACTIVE COMPOSTING SCREENING COMPOST + £ product value CURING <ul><li>(By hand; mechanical) </li></ul>Rejects <ul><li>High capacity shredder </li></ul>Introduce oxygen 60 - 70 °C <ul><li>Windrow turner </li></ul><ul><li>Front end loader </li></ul><ul><li>Forced aeration </li></ul><ul><li>In-vessel system </li></ul>“ Maturation phase” Temperature  ambient <ul><li>Trommel, power </li></ul><ul><li>or star screen </li></ul>Rejects
    6. 7. © The Composting Association What can be composted ? May be anywhere between 30 - 50 % (w/w) municipal waste suitable for composting } } Some paper & card Garden wastes and kitchen putrescibles (botanical origin) 17% Kitchen waste 18 % Paper 3 % Fines 3 % Textiles 16 % Other 8 % Metal 7 % Glass 7 % Plastics BIODEGRADABLE 20% Garden waste
    7. 8. Recycling, Energy & Strategies <ul><li>Waste Strategy for England 2007 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Targets for local authorities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>C&I waste </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Focus on Anaerobic Digestion by DEFRA </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Energy White Paper </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Energy security </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Biomass – possible threat </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Proposed 2 x ROCs and subsidies for AD </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Peak oil” debate </li></ul></ul>
    8. 9. UK Composting Industry <ul><ul><ul><li>3.4 million tonnes organic wastes composted in 2005/06 </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>1 million tonnes compost supplied to agriculture </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Main feedstocks and processing types: </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Green waste – open windrow </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Green/food waste – enclosed/in-vessel </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Green waste = 81% of wastes composted in 2005/06 </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Food waste = 12% of wastes composted in 2005/06 </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>National quality standard – BSI PAS 100 & QP </li></ul></ul></ul>
    9. 10. Background <ul><li>Sustained growth in composting over last decade </li></ul>
    10. 11. Regulations and Industry Standards <ul><ul><ul><li>Regulatory Controls : </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Animal By-Products Regulations – enforced by SVS (now called Animal Health) </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Waste Management Licensing Regulations – enforced by EA/SEPA </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Some sites run under an exemption (volume related) </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Industry standards : </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>BSI PAS 100 and Quality Protocol – audited by independent certification bodies managed by The Composting Association </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Now contracted out to two Certification bodies </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Heavily regulated industry </li></ul></ul></ul>
    11. 12. BSI PAS 100: 2005 <ul><li>Developed from Composting Association’s Standards for Compost </li></ul><ul><li>To develop good operational practices </li></ul><ul><li>To provide end-users with minimum product quality assurances </li></ul><ul><li>To help develop sustainable markets </li></ul><ul><li>To specify in contracts with local authorities </li></ul>
    12. 13. © The Composting Association Indicative CAPEX Source: Strategy Unit 2002
    13. 14. © The Composting Association Large scale composting Open-air turned-windrows
    14. 15. IN VESSEL FACILITIES
    15. 16. © The Composting Association Some environmental impacts of composting
    16. 17. Designated markets Domestic use horticulture Land restoration Agriculture & field horticulture Soil manufacture and blending (Landscape)
    17. 18. © The Composting Association Conclusions <ul><li>Composting has many and varied legislative drivers </li></ul><ul><li>Significant additional capacity is required to meet National and Local objectives and targets </li></ul><ul><li>Composting is a rapidly expanding industry </li></ul><ul><li>There are a wide range of existing and developing technologies </li></ul><ul><li>Composting has environmental impacts that can be controlled and mitigated </li></ul><ul><li>Robust markets for quality composts are becoming established </li></ul>
    18. 19. Thank you Further information at: www.compost.org.uk

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