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121206- IDEA 12 Conference (Melbourne)- Delia Browne
 

121206- IDEA 12 Conference (Melbourne)- Delia Browne

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  • Do you remember the world without the internet and all the innovations affecting the internet? Think of how much has changed since 1998.
  • The internet has revolutionised modern education and completely changed the way teaching and learning happens in Australian schools. Eg, the new Australian Curriculum is solely available online. Teachers no longer just stand at the front of a class and teach. Innovations such as ‘flipped classrooms’ let students study a topic online at home and come to school to do practical work with the teacher as a coach or facilitator. Students are just as likely to be using an iPad as a pencil. Australia’s copyright laws have not kept up with the pace of change in Australian schools. Laws written for the photocopier just don’t work on the internet. Flipped classrooms need fresh thinking!
  • The outdated copyright laws are: complex; inflexible; and costing Australian schools millions of dollars every year
  • Teachers should not have to divert their time away from teaching to figure out our unreasonably complex copyright laws.
  • Our current educational exceptions are too technologically specific and frequently refer to out-dated technologies which do not reflect the realities of educational practices today These issues make current educational exceptions: inflexible, unable to adapt to the realities of educational practices in a digital age, and in many instances of very little use to educators
  • Our current copyright system discourages educators from taking full advantage of emerging technologies, which diminishes the potential impact of the new DER and NBN disadvantages our students Amending the Copyright Act every few years to recognise new teaching practices and technologies is not the answer. The answer is a more flexible, sensible exception
  • Our copyright laws are costing Australian schools millions of dollars every year The statutory licensing scheme is very expensive. It assumes all materials are remunerable unless specifically excluded. There is no free copying of a reasonable amount in Australia. To copy up to 10%, Australian Schools pay millions each year, while in Courses and materials that are free for all other countries in the world are paid for in Australia when schools use or communicate the material ----for example MOOCs This is all due to our statutory licensing scheme
  • MOOCs Higher Ed MIT OCW- the largest OCW project, sharing course content from all 1,900 MIT courses Stanford getting into the game – last year opened several undergraduate courses for free, this year another 7 courses offered. Eg Introduction to AI – over 100,000 enrollments in 1 st weeks! Anyone can sign up, watch lectures, have their homework graded, and take the exams. Everyone who passes will receive a certificate verifying their completion of the course and marking how they ranked compared to others in the class, including the Stanford students who’ll be attending in person. Taught by professors who are some of the biggest names in the field. Director of Research at Google, the former senior computer scientist at NASA... UC Berkley, Yale, others all doing similar things (See here for further info -> http://singularityhub.com/2011/08/18/100000-sign-up-for-stanfords-open-class-on-artificial-intelligence-classes-with-1-million-next/)
  • This is contrary to a voluntary licensing scheme where schools are open to decide what content they want to use and licence accordingly It is more efficient for the education sector and copyright owners alike to have all uses of copyright materials that are not covered by an open-ended exception to be paid for under voluntary licensing arrangements than the current system of statutory licensing An educational copying regime based on a set of core, non-remunerable public interest uses supported by voluntary licences would be considerably more suitable, efficient and fair than the current regime for the digital environment. It is certain that under whatever model replaces the existing statutory licences, Australian schools will continue to deal directly with rights holders (either directly or through collecting societies), for all uses that are not covered by and/or exceed the limits of any new flexible exception. This may include situations where schools wish to copy in excess of amounts that would be considered ‘fair’ under an exception, or for purposes that would not themselves be considered ‘fair’.
  • This table uses a ‘traffic light’ analysis to compare the situation in Australia (where most uses are automatically remunerable) with the situation in Canada and the US, where these same uses will often amount to Fair Dealing/Fair Use.   In preparing this table, we have had regard to Canadian and US case law on Fair Dealing/Fair Use. We have also had regard to guidelines that have been prepared to assist US and Canadian teachers to determine whether a particular use is fair. We acknowledge that the Fair Dealing/Fair Use analysis involves weighing up certain factors, including the amount copied and the nature of the work. The point of this table is not to suggest that uses that are remunerable in Australia would automatically be treated as “fair” in Canada or the US. Rather, the point of the table is to illustrate the way in which uses that are automatically remunerable in Australia may amount to Fair Dealing/Fair Use in these comparable jurisdictions.   Red = Remunerable, Orange = May be Fair Dealing/Fair Use and Green = Probably Fair Dealing/Fair Use
  • Australian schools already pay significantly more copyright fees than in equivalent countries: Australian schools pay over 14 times more in copyright fees per student than schools in New Zealand. 65% of pages coped from works in Australian schools in 2010 would have been free to use in the United States and Canada. Governments, parents and students expect Australian schools to use new technologies. But our copyright laws penalise schools if they do. For example: The statutory licence applies to all copies and communications made in schools, no matter how minor or incidental. Showing material in class using an interactive whiteboard can involve up to 4 times as many remunerable activities than printing a copy for each student. The default provisions of the statutory licences mean that schools pay millions of dollars in public funds each year just to use materials that are freely available on the internet.
  • Statutory licences: Discourage uses of new technology Require schools to pay millions just to use the internet Are very expensive Do not reflect the public interest Are economically inefficient And create unacceptably high administrative burdens The statutory licences discourage uses of new technologies At the same time as governments are encouraging greater use of digital materials in Australian schools , the statutory licences create strong disincentives to do so. For example:   ‘ Old technology’ would see a teacher print copies of a scene from a play to hand out in class. ‘ New technology’ might see a teacher save a scene from a play found on a website to their laptop’s hard drive, email it to their school email account, upload it to the school’s learning management system and display it on an interactive white board in the classroom.   Using old technology would involve one remunerable act under a statutory licence. Using new technology would involve 4 separately recorded remunerable activities.   Australian schools should not be penalised by the Copyright Act for using new technologies for the benefit of Australian students. Australian schools pay millions of dollars just to use the internet   The application of the statutory licences to all digital materials means that Australian schools pay millions of dollars of public funds to use freely available internet materials (such as online health fact sheets or free tourism maps of Australia). The same content is available on the internet around the world, every day, for free - but must be paid for in Australian schools. The statutory licences are very expensive School copyright costs in Australia are significantly higher than comparable countries (next slide). This means Australian schools pay 14 times more per student to use copyright works than schools in New Zealand. The statutory licences do not reflect the public interest   The Copyright Act fails to provide for virtually any non-remunerable public interest uses in Australian schools. Schools pay for things that individuals can do for free, such as copying short extracts of materials for students’ research or study, or copying off air broadcasts to watch later during school hours. 65% of pages copied and paid for in Australian schools in 2010 under the Part VB licence would have been free to use in the United States or Canada.   The statutory licences are economically inefficient   The statutory licences were designed as a solution to market failure in a photocopying age. They are now being used to create ‘false markets’ in digital works - markets that would not exist ‘but for’ the statutory licences, and markets that do not exist anywhere else in the world. They also sit uncomfortably with public sector obligations regarding expenditure of public funds. For example, public monies paid for orphan works under the licence are not returned to education budgets, but result in windfall gains to other copyright owners.   Statutory licences create unacceptably high administrative burdens   ‘ Smart copying’ practices implemented by schools to contain copyright costs are increasing the burden of administering the licences. This is bad for schools, collecting societies and rights holders (in the form of reduced amounts available for distribution if administrative costs increase). One out of every two records collected under the Part VB survey is now excluded from the licence and will not attract a fee, merely impose an administrative cost. This is an unacceptably high burden and contrary to the intentions of the Franki Committee, which recommended setting up Part VB in part to reduce transaction costs.
  • The second component to fixing our broken system are OER. What are Open Educational Resources? Resources created and released openly – open license is key. Free as in free beer (no cost) and free as in freedom (free to use, repurpose and re-share) Commonly defined as digital materials offered free for educators, students and self learners to use, re-use and re-distribute for teaching, learning and research. They often rely on the use of common "open" licences, such as the Creative Commons licences.   They are different to traditional distribution models which generally require remuneration and largely restrict the rights of end-users to copy, re-use and re-purpose material.
  • Copyright Tensions: Compliance and Costs New technologies facilitate access to, storage and sharing of copyright materials. This makes copyright a serious issue for the education sector as it must: - Ensure systems, teachers and students comply with copyright law - Manage increasing cost implications Eg Schools paid over $80m in 2011 for sector-wide licences (more on direct licences & own content) Schools pay to copy/save freely and publicly available internet content, under the compulsory statutory licence (Copyright Agency and Screenrights) Current sector-wide licences & statutory exceptions do not fit well with ICT use in education: content may not be modified content cannot be shared widely (eg with parents, community, other schools) limit on how much you can copy/communicate Website terms and conditions Website terms and conditions can be unclear, confusing and/or difficult to understand…or absent entirely. Often, ‘educational use’ may not have been specifically considered when website terms and conditions were drafted. In many cases, website terms and conditions refer to 'personal' or 'non-commercial' use, but not to 'educational use' As a result, the intention of the website publisher with regards to educational use of their site is unknown. OER overcomes a lot of these tensions.
  • Open licences key aspect of this – eg Creative Commons Creative Commons works to make it easy for creators to share … to realize the full potential of the internet – universal access to research, education, full participation in culture – to drive a new era of development, growth, and productivity. CC Licenses make it easy and legal to share… and, as we all know, the core part of any OER definition is the educational resource is either Open license In the public domain So anyone can: reuse, revise, remix and redistribute. CC offers free tools that allow artists, musicians, journalists, educators and others share content on more flexible terms than default all rights reserved copyright it’s important to note that CC Licenses are not a substitute for copyright; they’re built on top of copyright law there’s 2 steps to applying a creative commons license to your work Large network within the jurisdiction, public and legal lead volunteers help to make the licenses work in their individual countries’ legal system 55 jurisdictions ported, another 5 in progress 71 active affiliate teams, 2 more in progress The CC Affiliate Network consists of 100+ affiliates working in over 70 jurisdictions to support and promote CC activities around the world. Over 500 million items Wikipedia: over 17 million Wikipedia articles across all languages Flickr: over 244 million CC-licensed photos
  • there are 6 CC licenses that reflect a spectrum of rights for the photos I share on Flickr, I use the Attribution only license, which means that anyone can download, copy, distribute, remix, tweak, and build upon them, even commercially, as long as they give me credit
  • http://www.ndlrn.edu.au/default.asp National Digital Learning Resources Network
  • The licensing regime initially developed for TLF in 2004, and still in operation for TLF Materials, limits the use of TLF Materials by jurisdictions, teachers and schools. Currently, access is provided free for educational purposes, but is restricted to centralised, password-protected, “web portals” maintained by the jurisdictions, and development and re-use of the materials is limited. For example, currently schools are generally prohibited from re-mixing and sharing TLF Materials with other schools, from using theTLF Materials on school websites, and from sharing them directly with parents. Adopting a “Creative Commons” licence for the TLF Materials would permit greater access and use of the resources, encouraging innovation and be more in line with current concepts of “open education” and “free educational use”. This proposal only relates to those materials owned by Education Services Australia on behalf of the NDLRN stakeholders. No change is proposed for the way in which third party materials are licensed. In most cases the CC licence with be Attribute, SA Unless material already branded by a CC licence, in which case same CC licence Candidate resources are resources with no 3 rd party content
  • NSW Dept of Education has released a range of interactive teaching resources under CC licences
  • Catholic Education Office of Western Australia- Kimberley Clipart: Aboriginal Designs and Borders---CC: BY NC ND Certain WestOne Resources are released under a CC licence. For example: “Produce Simple Word Processing Documents”----CC: BY NC SA WestOne: supports the strategic priorities of the Department of Training and Workforce Development through the development of training products and services. WestOne was established in 1999 by the Government of Western Australia to provide the Western Australian training sector with access to quality, flexible learning resources. Some material is offered for educational use but is not for reproduction for commercial purposes without written permission from WestOne Services. Other materials are offered under a Creative Commons Attribution licence. Tracks to Two-Way Learning: Educational resources developed at the school level, released under a CC licence ACARA has released the Australian National Curriculum under a CC licence. Smartcopying website – full of useful educational resources re Creative Commons and OER, as well as much other information about copyright for educators. Itself open to use under a CC licence.
  • More frequently now schools are locally creating their own educational content and releasing the material under a CC licence - As an example the Catholic Education Diocese of Parramatta licence their Learning and Teaching with iPads blog under a CC licence as well as their presentations to conferences - Learning and Teaching with iPads blog under a creative commons licence (BY-NC-SA) ( http://learningwithipads.blogspot.com.au /) - Presentations to a conference is Creative Commons licenced ( http://www.slideshare.net/lnash/ipads-asla-conference) On Aussie Educator there are now multiple avenues to access textbooks at no cost. Some are older versions, some have been written specifically using licences allowing free access such as Creative Commons. Tasmanian Polytechnic has embarked on a project (using WikiEducator) to incorporate OER into teaching. The institute is currently working on a state-wide eLearning Strategy for 2012-2014 which will include policy recommendations to use and contribute to OER. Forthcoming initiatives: Western Australia Department of Education has approval its website material to be licenced under a CC BY licence Victoria’s Department of Education and Early Childhood Development funded TAFE training products are now required to be released under CC licences
  • http://www.unesco.org/new/en/communication-and-information/resources/news-and-in-focus-articles/all-news/news/unesco_world_oer_congress_releases_2012_paris_oer_declaration/
  • UNESCO: whose participants in 2002 expressed “their wish to develop together a universal educational resource available for the whole of humanity” November 2011 launched Guidelines on Open Educational Resources (OER) in Higher Education and associated tools to implement OER initiatives Hosted 2012 Global OER Conference in June OECD: OECD’s OER project that asks why OER is happening, who is involved and what the most important implications are of this global movement. 2007 report explores the OER concept and reasons for government to support OER. ( Giving Knowledge for Free: The Emergence of Open Educational Resources )
  • US: On 27/09/12 California created the nation’s first Open-Source Textbook library. The state will seek to determine the 50 most widely-taken lower-division courses in the California higher-education system. These in all likelihood, will also be some of the most widely-taken courses across the country. They will then seek to create textbooks for these courses Canada: on 17/10/12 British Columbia became the first Canadian province to launch an open textbook initiative, committing to 40 new online, open textbooks for 40 popular post-secondary courses. The open texts can be freely accessed and modified and could be in use for the 2013-14 academic year. Three Important Things to Consider with Regard to New Open-Source Legislation: 1) Maintains Academic Freedom: The bill as it is written maintains the academic freedom of faculty to make decisions about what they feel they need for their classrooms. Faculty maintain their power and are given quality alternatives to consider. The CC BY license gives faculty the rigths to reuse, remix, revise and redistribute books as they choose. The Creative Commons liscense gives legal rights for the faculty to re-purpose the books for local needs. 2) Connect to Other Libraries: The basis of OER is to reuse and remix. The content created in this process will provide a whole new world of quality materials for faculty to choose from. Once connected to repositories such as Connexions and MERLOT, the new potential for new textbooks is limitless. 3) Working Smarter: With a limited budget of only $10 million dollars (five million from the state and five million from foundations), the faculty group created to drive initial textbook production will need to consider all kinds of strategies from textbook acquisition to building from scratch. The key will be to find ways to meet the quality and stay under budget.
  • Higher education – other new models P2PU – people learn from peers, badges system University of the People Others emerging around the globe
  • http://www.unesco.org/new/en/communication-and-information/resources/news-and-in-focus-articles/all-news/news/unesco_and_oer_foundation_join_hands_in_building_capability_in_oer/ The Workshop schedule and registration details are available online.
  • In a paper released in conjunction with a panel discussion, the Brookings Institution identifies promising policy ideas to encourage entrepreneurship and innovative growth in the technology industry. (http://creativecommons.org/weblog/entry/35290)
  • The European Commission opened a public consultation from mid August to mid November of this year on "Opening up Education” http://ec.europa.eu/dgs/education_culture/consult/open_en.htm. The resulting Rethinking Education strategy was announced on 20 November: http://europa.eu/rapid/press-release_IP-12-1233_en.htm . And one of the points made is: "Technology, in particular the internet, must be fully exploited. Schools, universities and vocational and training institutions must increase access to education via open educational resources."

121206- IDEA 12 Conference (Melbourne)- Delia Browne 121206- IDEA 12 Conference (Melbourne)- Delia Browne Presentation Transcript

  • Copyright Law Reform -Open Education Resources 06 December 2012 Idea 12 Beyond Connectivity: Making it happen for learners Delia Browne National Copyright Director National Copyright Unit www.smartcopying.edu.au
  • Smartcopying Website www.smartcopying.edu.au• National Copyright Guidelines for Schools and TAFEs• Practical and simple information sheets and FAQs• Interactive teaching resources on copyright• Search the site for answers to your copyright questions 2
  • Slides available at:http://www.slideshare.net/nationalcopyrightunit/This work is licensed under the CC Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Australia License (unless otherwise noted) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/au/ 3
  • Do you rememberthe world withoutthe internet andall theinnovationsaffecting theinternet? 4
  • The internet has revolutionised modern education Australia’scopyright laws have not kept up with the pace of change in Australian schools. Since the introduction of our copyright laws, technology has drastically changed. Educational copyright provisions written in the age of the photocopier don’t work in the age of the iPad. 5
  • Our out-dated copyright lawsare:ComplexInflexibleCosting Australian schools millions of dollars every year 6
  • Our copyright laws are too complex Our current educational copyright system is a complex web of statutory licences, overly specific exceptions, and voluntary licencing schemes. Attempting to figure out: • Is this educational resource a literary work/dramatic work/etc? • What licence does this activity fit under? Or how and what copyright exception applies? • Is what I’m doing ‘for the purposes of a course of education’ or ‘in the course of giving educational instruction’ or ‘solely for the educational purposes’----what are the differences in these?! • Am I restricting this awards night to the ‘school community’ only? • Is the school intranet locked and only accessible to students and faculty with a log-in? • Does any other class have the same material that I need to use up on the LMS already? • How much can I copy? • How must I label this material? Is too much for teachers 7
  • Our copyright laws are toocomplex Part VB Part VA s.200AB Schools’ Copying limits: No copying Limited format  10% or 1 limits. shifting rights. music chapter Can format You cannot buy licences  Attach notice if shift. it. communicating. Attach notice if Only copy what communicating. you need.Images or print worksOff air television and radiobroadcastsPodcasts of free-to-airbroadcasts (available onthe broadcaster’s website)YouTube videosDVDs and videosNote: Most commercial DVDsare protected by ATPMs andcannot be copied because itillegal to circumvent an ATPM.Cassette tapes and CDs 8
  • Our copyright laws are inflexible Our current educational exceptions are technologically specific and frequently refer to out-dated technologies which do not reflect the realities of educational practices today These issues make current educational exceptions: • Inflexible; • unable to adapt to the realities of educational practices in a digital age; • and in many instances of very little use to educators. 9
  • Our copyright laws are inflexible Our current copyright system discourages educators from taking full advantage of emerging technologies, which • diminishes the potential impact of the new DER and NBN • disadvantages our students Amending the Copyright Act every few years to recognise new teaching practices and technologies is not the answer. The answer is a more flexible exception 10
  • Our copyright laws are costing Australian schools millions of dollars every year The statutory licensing scheme is very expensive. It assumes all materials are remunerable unless specifically excluded. Unlike most countries, there is no free copying of a reasonable amount in Australia Courses and materials that are free for all other countries in the world are paid for in Australia when schools use or communicate the material 11
  • “Free” courses are not free inAustralia due to our copyright lawsMIT Stanford 12
  • Our copyright laws are costingAustralian schools millions of dollarsevery year Australian schools pay millions of dollars just to use the internet In no other country do schools pay for activities that we pay for Last year Australian schools paid over $80 million in licensing fees to collecting societies This is all due to our current statutory licensing scheme which assumes all educational material is remunerable. 13
  • Our copyright laws are costing Australian schools millions of dollars every yearAustralian schools pay significantly more copyright fees than in equivalent countries Australian schools pay approximately 14 times more per student for educational use of copyright works than schools in New Zealand 14
  • Australian schools pay millions to useeducational materials they purchased Common school activities Australia Canada USARed = RemunerableOrange = Possible fairdealing/fair useGreen = Probably fairdealing/fair use
  • Our current copyright system isbroken Our out-dated copyright laws are complex, inflexible and costing Australian schools millions of dollars every year Governments, parents and students expect Australian schools to use new technologies. But our copyright laws penalise schools if they do 16
  • How to fix our broken system- 2things must be done 1. Copyright Law Reform AND2. Open Education Resources 17
  • Copyright Law Reform- ALRC The Australian Law Reform Commission (ALRC) is currently undertaking a significant and extremely extensive review of copyright law---the biggest in 25 years The ALRC inquiry: http://www.alrc.gov.au/inquiries/copyright- and-digital-economy 18
  • Copyright Law Reform- ALRC Australian Schools and TAFEs have made the following recommendations: • Australia’s educational exceptions and statutory licences are completely broken and must be repealed. • The Copyright Act must be amended to replace the existing educational exceptions and statutory licences with either: • A general open-ended provision based on a fairness analysis that could apply to all users of copyright materials • A new fair dealing exception for education. 19
  • Copyright Law Reform- ALRC Introducing a flexible exception does not mean that all educational uses of copyright materials would be free. Replacing the statutory licences and moving to a system of a flexible fair dealing/fair use provision supported by direct and/or collective voluntary licensing is the most appropriate way to ensure: • the appropriate remuneration for Australian creators, • the continued creation of educational content, and • the public interest uses of copyright materials are adequately recognised.We are not asking for a free ride – simply a fair ride 20
  • Repealing the statutory licences and introducing a flexible copyright exception similar to the US’ fair use provision would: Fix issues arising from: • technologically-specific statutory licences • exceptions that can operate as a disincentive or penalty to the use of best practice teaching methods enabled by new technologies Future-proof the Copyright Act for the digital economy to ensure Australian teachers can deliver the full educational benefits made possible by the digital economy 21
  • Repealing the statutory licences andintroducing a flexible copyright exceptionsimilar to the US’ fair use provision would: Recognise and reinforce the public interest in appropriate free educational uses of copyright materials Make Australia’s ‘copyright balance’ in relation to educational uses consistent with emerging international philosophies about the benefits of flexible exceptions to a digital economy Ensure that Australian schools are no longer disadvantaged when using new technologies in teaching, and no longer pay for uses of copyright materials that comparable countries treat as free. 22
  • 2. Open Education Resources OER are teaching, learning, and research materials in any medium that reside in the public domain or have been released under an open licence that permits their free use and re-purposing by others. 23
  • OER Fundamental Values Resources are free for any individual to use Are licensed for unrestricted distribution Possibility of adaptation, translation, re-mix, and improvement. 24
  • OER are all aboutCreating repositories of material which are free to: Access Use Modify Share You can do much more with OER as compared with traditional copyright material 25
  • OER How it all works: Open licences are a key aspect of OER: Creative CommonsCreative Commons Information Pack for Teachers and Students - http://www.smartcopying.edu.au/scw/go/pid/953 26
  • Creative Commons Licenses CC BY – C Green 2011 27
  • OER: A Decade of Development 28 CC BY – C Green 2011
  • OER in Australia No OER policyBut OER initiatives are emerging organically 29
  • OER in Australia: NDLRN More than 12,000 digital curriculum resources that are free for use in all Australian schools Aligned to state and territory curriculums and are progressively being aligned to the Australian Curriculum as it develops Made available to teachers through state and territory portals or Scootle. 30
  • OER in Australia: NDLRN Issue: Currently materials are provided free for educational purposes, but are restricted to centralised, password-protected, ‘web portals’ maintained by the jurisdictions, and development and re-use of the materials is limited Adopting a CC licence for these materials will permit greater access and use of the resources which will encourage innovation Currently there are 1343 candidate learning resources being transitioned to CC licences • Work in progress, with a goal of finalising the transition in March 2013. 31
  • NSW Dept of Education OER 32
  • OER inAustralia 33
  • OER in Australia 34
  • UNESCO 2012 Paris OER Declaration On June 22, 2012 the World OER Congress released the 2012 Paris OER Declaration The Declaration calls on governments to openly licence publicly funded educational materials Australia is a signatory Signatories will foster research on the development, use and reuse of OER and their impact on the quality and cost-efficiency of teaching and learning. The Congress featured presentations from key supporters of OERs worldwide. • The President of the Harvard-MIT online learning system edX, announced his organization’s goal of teaching one billion students through free and openly licensed versions of Harvard and MIT classes. • President and CEO of the Commonwealth of Learning based in Vancouver (Canada) said, “OERs are an important milestone in democratizing education”. 35
  • Global OER • UNESCO • OECD • Connexions • MERLOT • CK-12 • OER Africa • OER Brazil • OER Foundation The Open • Olnet Wikipedia • Community Mozillla • PIRGS is large, • OLI passionate • Universities and Community Colleges • And many more and strong 36
  • Open-Source Textbook Initiatives California: will determine the 50 most widely-taken lower- division courses in the California higher-education system and create textbooks for these courses that will be free in digital form and in print for $20 or less. British Columbia: will create 40 new online, open textbooks for 40 popular post-secondary courses. The open texts will be free to access and will be able to be modified. 37
  • 38
  • Copyright 4 Educators (Aus)--- March 2013MOOCs Creative Commons 4 Educators---March 2013 39
  •  School of Open • The School of Open will offer courses on the meaning and application of ‘open’ on the web and in offline environments. Artists, educators, learners, scientists, archivists, and other creators already improve their fields via the use of open tools and materials. So can you. • Examples of the many courses being offered: • Teach someone something with open content • Get CC savvy • Open Access Wikipedia Challenge School of Education • Its about hands-on learning driven by each educators particular needs and classroom situations. Its about connecting, collaborating, and creating, not just reading or studying. All courses in this school are free, open-licensed (CC BY), and online. You can use the content in them for any purpose you like as long as you cite the source. • Examples of the many courses being offered: • K12 Online 2012 • Text-dependent Research- History/Social Studies- Level 1 • Citing Evidence in Conversations - ELA- Level 1 • Independent Reading – Science- Level 1 40
  • UNESCO and OER Foundation free online workshop Free online workshop designed for educators and students who want to learn more about OER, copyright and creative commons licenses will take place from 3 to 14 December 2012. Two workshops organized in early 2012 saw 1,583 registrations from more than 90 countries. The upcoming workshop aims to contribute to the implementation of the 2012 Paris OER Declaration, and specifically article (e), which calls for “capacity building for sustainable development of quality learning materials”. Workshop schedule: http://wikieducator.org/Open_content_licensing_for _educators/Workshop_schedule Registration details: http://wikieducator.org/Open_content_licensing_for _educators/About 41
  • OER: The Way of the Future“In an era of limited resources, educators must figure out how to domore with fewer financial resources. One action that would improve school efficiency and financing is to have educational resources developed with taxpayer dollars be licensed under a creative commons license that would improve accessibility to instructional materials. Budget circumstances require schools to get more efficient, boost productivity, and make do with fewer financialresources. While this poses obvious problems for school districts, it also creates the possibility of making changes in business operations that are innovative and transformational.” 42
  • OER: The Way of the Future “Technology, in particular the internet, must be fully exploited. Schools, universities and vocational and training institutions must increase access to education via open educational resources." “New technologies…together with globalisation and the emergence of new education providers, are radically changing the way people learn and teach. Open access to education resources offers an unprecedented opportunity to enhance both excellence and equity in education.” 43
  • References and Resources This presentation – http://http://www.slideshare.net/nationalcopyrightunit/ Smartcopying website - http://www.smartcopying.edu.au/scw/go Creative Commons Information Pack - http://www.smartcopying.edu.au/scw/go/pid/953 ALRC inquiry – http://www.alrc.gov.au/inquiries/copyright- and-digital-economy ALRC submissions - http://www.alrc.gov.au/inquiries/copyright- and-digital-economy/submissions-received-alrc 44
  • For More Information Delia Browne delia.browne@det.nsw.edu.au (02) 9561 8876 Carl Ruppin carl.ruppin@det.nsw.edu.au (02) 9561 1267 Jessica Smith jessica.smith81@det.nsw.edu.au (02) 9561 8730 Smartcopying Website www.smartcopying.edu.au 45