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Disaster Recovery PlanningAre you covered?<br />Minasi internet Meeting 2010<br />Ultan Kinahan<br />kinahan@live.com <br />
Who am I?<br /><ul><li>Ultan Kinahan
Born & Raised in Ireland & moved states side in 1992 the week after I finished college & started working in a bar in Green...
Currently;
Regional IT Director of Brown & Brown Insurance Co.
Previous roles included:
AOL – “Mapquest, Digital City & Moviefone”
Network Admin for a realty firm in NYC
Multiple Consulting positions</li></li></ul><li>What constitutes a disaster?<br /><ul><li>Disaster is Natural, Recovery is...
A disaster is an unplanned event that interrupts normal business operations.
Types of events
“Acts of God”
Floods
Earthquakes
Volcano's
Snow Storms
etc.
Man Made
Acts of Terrorism</li></li></ul><li>A few phrases we've all comes across<br /><ul><li>Risk Management
Business Continuity
Disaster Recovery
Recovery Time Objective (RTO)
The target time for making an application available
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Ultan kinahan dr - minasi 2010

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  1. 1. Disaster Recovery PlanningAre you covered?<br />Minasi internet Meeting 2010<br />Ultan Kinahan<br />kinahan@live.com <br />
  2. 2. Who am I?<br /><ul><li>Ultan Kinahan
  3. 3. Born & Raised in Ireland & moved states side in 1992 the week after I finished college & started working in a bar in Greenwich Village NYC… Landed first role in IT here in late ‘92
  4. 4. Currently;
  5. 5. Regional IT Director of Brown & Brown Insurance Co.
  6. 6. Previous roles included:
  7. 7. AOL – “Mapquest, Digital City & Moviefone”
  8. 8. Network Admin for a realty firm in NYC
  9. 9. Multiple Consulting positions</li></li></ul><li>What constitutes a disaster?<br /><ul><li>Disaster is Natural, Recovery is Superhuman!
  10. 10. A disaster is an unplanned event that interrupts normal business operations.
  11. 11. Types of events
  12. 12. “Acts of God”
  13. 13. Floods
  14. 14. Earthquakes
  15. 15. Volcano's
  16. 16. Snow Storms
  17. 17. etc.
  18. 18. Man Made
  19. 19. Acts of Terrorism</li></li></ul><li>A few phrases we've all comes across<br /><ul><li>Risk Management
  20. 20. Business Continuity
  21. 21. Disaster Recovery
  22. 22. Recovery Time Objective (RTO)
  23. 23. The target time for making an application available
  24. 24. Recovery Point Objective (RPO)
  25. 25. The age of the data recovered
  26. 26. Data Center
  27. 27. Where we store all our toys.</li></li></ul><li>What is DRP (Disaster Recovery Planning) ?<br /><ul><li>Essentially the breakdown goes:
  28. 28. RM (Risk Management) drives BCP (Business Continuity Planning)
  29. 29. BCP (Business Continuity Planning) drives DRP (Disaster Recovery Planning)
  30. 30. DRP – Mainly where the IT comes into play and involves: Planning and implementation of procedures and facilities for use when essential systems are not available for a prolonged period of time</li></li></ul><li>What is BCP (Business Continuity Planning) ?<br /><ul><li>Business continuity planning
  31. 31. Is the creation and validation of a practiced logistical plan for how an organization will recover and restore partially or completely interrupted critical (urgent) functions within a predetermined time after a disaster or extended disruption. The logistical plan is called a business continuity plan.
  32. 32. In plain language
  33. 33. BCP is working out how to stay in business in the event of disaster. Incidents include local incidents like building fires, regional incidents like earthquakes, or national incidents like pandemic illnesses.</li></li></ul><li>A few Statistics<br /><ul><li>In 2009 Symantec released the results of its fifth annual Global IT Disaster Recovery survey;
  34. 34. According to the report, 93% of organizations have had to execute their DR Plans and the average cost:
  35. 35. USA: $287,000
  36. 36. Canada: $496,500
  37. 37. The average budget for disaster recovery initiatives worldwideis $50 million USD – Not a lot really!
  38. 38. Average time it takes to "achieve skeleton operations after an outage" is 3hours.
  39. 39. Average time to be fully "up and running after an outage," the average is 4hours, states the report. </li></li></ul><li>A few Statistics - continued<br /><ul><li>Executive-level involvement in DR plans is rising.
  40. 40. In 2007, 55% of respondents reported DR committees involved the CIO, CTO or IT director
  41. 41. this dropped to 33 per cent in 2008
  42. 42. The number rose to 67 per cent in 2009
  43. 43. DR "becoming a competitive differentiator“ within organizations – especially in the financial sector
  44. 44. Also driven by budgets, Upper management making sure IT spends wisely in the current economy </li></li></ul><li>Disaster Recovery Planning Objectives<br /><ul><li>Develop the ability to recover key business functions following a disaster
  45. 45. Recover systems based on a timeline as defined by an Internal Audit of operations
  46. 46. IT Infrastructure (12-24 hours)
  47. 47. Processing System (24-48 hours)
  48. 48. Email (4 days)
  49. 49. Financials (5 days)</li></li></ul><li>What is mainly affected?<br /><ul><li>A Business Impact Analysis is essential to determine what core business functions would be most critical to restore following a disaster.
  50. 50. Internal Audits are one of the best options.
  51. 51. Typical findings;
  52. 52. Financials (accounts receivables, accounts payable, etc)
  53. 53. HR/Payroll (Payroll, Benefits processing, etc)
  54. 54. IT Infrastructure (to support the business applications above)</li></li></ul><li>What Systems or Services are Required?<br /><ul><li>Outline all business critical needs for restoration of services within the timeline determined by the analysis.
  55. 55. Servers
  56. 56. Desktops
  57. 57. Laptops
  58. 58. Networking Gear
  59. 59. Data Lines
  60. 60. Software
  61. 61. Home Grown Apps
  62. 62. Vendor Based Apps
  63. 63. Vendor Contact List
  64. 64. Etc…</li></li></ul><li>What mediums are available?<br /><ul><li>Portable & Low Cost Options: Has its benefits
  65. 65. CD’s, DVD’s
  66. 66. USB Sticks or Drives
  67. 67. Tape
  68. 68. Disk
  69. 69. Local Replication
  70. 70. Other Options
  71. 71. Application Replication (Local site or Site to Site)
  72. 72. Site to Site Replication (Branch site or Colocation)
  73. 73. Cloud Storage or hosted applications
  74. 74. Thin client computing – VDI</li></li></ul><li>Mmm, What do I need to start?<br /><ul><li>First things first…Funding Approval!!!
  75. 75. Purchase new storage, servers, software, licensing etc.
  76. 76. Can you use existing (non-production) systems at a second data center?
  77. 77. Data lines
  78. 78. Configuration of servers, software & storage
  79. 79. Setup external access ports for failover
  80. 80. MX Records, Terminal Server, Citrix, VPN etc.
  81. 81. Testing failover</li></li></ul><li>Bandwidth – The Replication Challenge<br /><ul><li>If you're lucky enough to get 70% of the bandwidth usable! you're likely to see transfer rates for a dedicated connection similar to those in the table below. </li></li></ul><li>Bandwidth - Continued<br /><ul><li>Reasons for loss of bandwidth:
  82. 82. The provider. In most cases with your standard T1 at 1.5MB your lucky to get 1.3MB then you have…
  83. 83. The asynchronous replication engine is often based on a protocol, protocol converter
  84. 84. Application running on top of IP or TCP
  85. 85. Transport protocol overhead
  86. 86. Replication protocol overhead</li></li></ul><li>Option – Double-Take<br /><ul><li>System Friendly Asynchronous Replication
  87. 87. Low CPU Overhead
  88. 88. Defined Memory and Disk Usage
  89. 89. Write Order Intact Replication
  90. 90. Bandwidth Friendly Data Movement
  91. 91. User-definable Replication Sets
  92. 92. Compression, Scheduling, Scheduled Bandwidth Throttling capabilities
  93. 93. Point-in-Time Recovery
  94. 94. Integration w/Volume Shadow Copy Services</li></li></ul><li>Application Failover<br />Source<br />Target<br />Replication<br />Failover Monitoring<br /><ul><li> IP ICMP or Heartbeat Monitoring
  95. 95. Detect Failure in Seconds or Minutes
  96. 96. Users can reconnect within minutes of failure
  97. 97. Failover can occur across a LAN, WAN and even NAT
  98. 98. Failover more than one Server Identity to the Same Target Server
  99. 99. Failover Scripting for Custom Configurations</li></li></ul><li>Application Failback<br />Source<br />Target<br />Restoration<br />Replication<br />Failover Monitoring<br /><ul><li> Failback Source Identity
  100. 100. Bring Source Application Online
  101. 101. Users Reconnect Within Minutes
  102. 102. Recover or Replace Source Server
  103. 103. Restore Data to the Source Server
  104. 104. Start Replication and Resume Failover Monitoring for Continued Protection</li></li></ul><li>Value of Automated Site Recovery<br /><ul><li>VMware Site Recovery Manager provides cost savings from:
  105. 105. Reduced recovery infrastructure requirements
  106. 106. Fewer hours spent creating and maintaining DR plans and processes
  107. 107. Significantly reduced cost of DR tests; eliminates IT staff overtime and application impact
  108. 108. Recovery in a matter of hours, not days or weeks – greatly reducing the financial exposure a company faces during a major outage
  109. 109. The following captures an estimate of the cost savings provided by SRM when used to recover from a major outage or disaster</li></ul>Company that does $25M in revenue a year = ~$96k/weekday. Assume that SRM can achieve RTO of 12 hours instead of 72 hours compared to traditional DR plan.<br />Value of Lost Revenue<br />Value of Lost Time by Workers<br />$96,153<br />2.5<br />X<br />+<br />500<br />2.5<br />=<br />X<br />$300/day<br />X<br />X<br />$ 615,385(per disaster)<br />X<br />Days of<br />faster recovery<br />Number of<br />workers<br />Lost revenue per workday<br />Days of<br />faster recovery<br />Cost of worker<br />wages<br />
  110. 110. Failover Automation<br /><ul><li>Detect site failures
  111. 111. Raise alert when heartbeat lost
  112. 112. Initiate failover
  113. 113. User confirmation of outage
  114. 114. Granular failover initiation
  115. 115. Manage replication failover
  116. 116. Break replication
  117. 117. Make replica visible to recovery hosts
  118. 118. Execute recovery process
  119. 119. Use pre-programmed plan
  120. 120. Provide visibility into progress</li></li></ul><li>Testing<br /><ul><li>Testing is key to success of any DR Plan no matter how big or small the environment
  121. 121. According to Symantec’s annual Global IT Disaster Recovery survey One in four DR tests fail. This marks an improvement, however, when compared to previous years.
  122. 122. In 2007, 50% of DR tests failed
  123. 123. In 2008, 30% of DR tests failed
  124. 124. and 25% in 2009
  125. 125. Symantec continues to say, that only 15% report that they never experienced a failure in test. </li></li></ul><li>Q&A<br /><ul><li>Any questions?</li></li></ul><li>Contact Information<br />Ultan Kinahan<br />Business Continuity & Disaster Recovery<br />Kinahan@live.com<br />
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