We intend to aim the documentary at young adults and teenagers that share the common interest of skateboarding,
as a sport...
Which subject would you find the
most interesting to watch?
1

Which subject would you find the
most interesting to watch?...
Research
To do a documentary on skateboarding, there are several elements that I must include in terms of editing, cameraw...
David Attenborough - Life of Mammals
Genre - Wildlife
•
Wildlife genre, covering solely mammals in the series.
•
Documenta...
David Attenborough – Life of Mammals
In this documentary, David Attenborough travels across the world analysing various di...
Banksy – Exit Through the Gift Shop
Genre – Lifestyle
•
Lifestyle genre, covering the life and style of graffiti artists.
...
Banksy – Exit Through the Gift Shop
In this documentary, Thierry Guetta - “an eccentric French shop keeper turned document...
With my group’s documentary, controversy and potential censorship should not occur due to the topic of the
film being in n...
The first time-lapse will be shot over the Maltby skate-park and will solely concentrate on the sunrise, in order to be us...
Props Skatestore
The main location within the documentary is Props Skatestore in Rotherham, due to the main interest of th...
Maltby Skate-park
Another location of the documentary that we intend to use is the local skate-park, as it gains a lot of ...
In the documentary, I would like to use conventional shots to support the vast amount of skateboarding videos out today. C...
Gaining permission from various different parties was essential during the planning stage of our production as we have to ...
All locations in which filming will take place must be checked for areas which could potentially put participants at risk....
In my mood board, I have shown various photos and scenes of filming techniques for skateboarding and interviewing.
All of ...
Intro –
We plan to use a photo montage to introduce the documentary, using images of skateboarders and skate-parks
to esta...
In the documentary, we plan to use tracks from a pop-punk band named Gnarwolves due to their direct
connection with the sk...
All of the people within the documentary are either to be interviewed or filmed skating. The main
focus of the documentary...
There are not any set costumes in the documentary as we want the skateboarding attire in the film to be as genuine as poss...
I have used specific shots throughout the documentary to compliment the theme of certain
scenes. During the interview with...
Development
Originally, the documentary was going to be based on the history of skateboarding, including an in-depth analy...
Our group prepared a blog at the following address - http://bit.ly/170pgud, which we produced in order to maximise the aud...
If the answers given are in-depth then we have more to work with when
editing, allowing us to pick the best bits of the fo...
A2 Media Studies | 'No Comply' Documentary Planning and Research
A2 Media Studies | 'No Comply' Documentary Planning and Research
A2 Media Studies | 'No Comply' Documentary Planning and Research
A2 Media Studies | 'No Comply' Documentary Planning and Research
A2 Media Studies | 'No Comply' Documentary Planning and Research
A2 Media Studies | 'No Comply' Documentary Planning and Research
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A2 Media Studies | 'No Comply' Documentary Planning and Research

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A2 Media Studies | 'No Comply' Documentary Planning and Research

  1. 1. We intend to aim the documentary at young adults and teenagers that share the common interest of skateboarding, as a sport or scene. I intend on interviewing various different people from different backgrounds, whether growing up with skateboarding or not. This will hopefully make the documentary more diverse regarding opinion or viewpoint on skating and will hopefully help to reach more people based on their own opinions. Although I would like to involve multiple different opinions, I am specifically focusing on an interview with someone with a heavy interest of skateboarding to support a more passionate role and therefore share their knowledge on the sport. I think that my film will appeal more-so to the male gender, due to its obvious dominance in the sport and lack of female support within the scene. Due to the dominant male support right from the creation of skateboarding until now, it is mainly seen as a more masculine sport due to the risk and potential danger involved. Although women can, and will, skate - I feel my documentary will interest the male audience more for these reasons. Through the years of skateboarding, women have never had a big influence within the sport due to the masses of the following being male. Stereotypically seen as a risky, dangerous sport to many people (including women), they can be easily put off and therefore see no reason to begin learning. Personally, I feel that the risk and danger involved with the sport is a big influence as to whether people want to follow it as a hobby. On a handful of occasions, women skateboarders become known due to their willingness to succeed in the sport and are hugely respected by fellow skaters, including both males and females. I think this documentary can open a woman’s eyes up to the joys of skateboarding and potentially change their minds on their outlook of the sport, concluding with a very positive result. I also plan to edit the documentary to a fast pace, this editing style would appeal to people of a similar age to myself (17), as the upbeat music compliments the footage and keeps it entertaining for younger viewers to watch. The main advantage of fast pace is that it keeps the viewer interested, as the film is constantly moving at a quick pace. Julian McDougall believes that there are no boundaries to audience and that they shouldn’t be pigeon-holed.
  2. 2. Which subject would you find the most interesting to watch? 1 Which subject would you find the most interesting to watch? Skateboarding 3 5 Social Media Skateboarding 4 6 Fashion 3 Which subject can you relate mostly towards? 1 3 6 Skateboarding Social Media Fashion Social Media Fashion
  3. 3. Research To do a documentary on skateboarding, there are several elements that I must include in terms of editing, camerawork and interviewing. I would like to achieve a fast pace to my documentary by editing the footage to be short and make it cut between shots throughout. I would also use the camerawork to support a fast pace, by filming a scene from various different angles to enable ‘short and snappy’ editing and to help maintain the pace throughout all areas (including interviews and skateboarding scenes.) I saw this similar style of editing in the Banksy documentary – “Exit Through the Gift Shop”, where footage and interviews were edited at a fast pace to suit the rhythm of the music, which takes on the style commonly seen in the participatory documentary mode. Exit Through the Gift Shop takes on a more participatory style, this is shown because Banksy himself is involved throughout and commentates and involves himself throughout various areas of the film. I feel like Banksy does this to make the documentary more personal to himself and helps him feel more involved. This style also helps the documentary feel more personal to the audience, which will help make the viewer feel more involved in the story. During my research, I also need to find out what music would be suitable for the documentary as music has a big input in the skateboarding scene and the many different meanings and genres that the music entails could potentially give off the wrong impression of what we are trying to achieve. The music we plan to use is by a band named Gnarwolves, who are skateboarders themselves and make music based around the topic and follow the conventional style of music associated with the sport. This choice of music would further emphasise the topic and enforce the nature of the sport alongside the footage that we will show throughout the documentary. Music is very important to the skating scene and by using the songs popular with the sports following, the viewer can immediately link the music to the footage that they are seeing. We hope that the use of music and the theme that it portrays will help further the audience experience - giving them the opportunity to the use their new knowledge of skateboarding at a personal level in their day to day lives.
  4. 4. David Attenborough - Life of Mammals Genre - Wildlife • Wildlife genre, covering solely mammals in the series. • Documentary mode – Observational style. David attempts to simply and spontaneously observe the ‘lived life’. Audience • The audience of Life of Mammals could be everyone due to the vast area of interest that the programme could appeal too. • People with a general interest in nature and animals. Camerawork • Point-of-view: Hand held. • Close-up: Very close to nature, close-ups of animals and other areas of interest. • Longshot: Establishing location of film and scene of episode. Audio • Music: Orchestral, gives a sophisticated atmosphere. During transitions of travel, they have used background music to fill the silence. The music is also themed and fits the style of the program, such as African music being used in David Attenborough’s series – Africa. Music is also used where David is talking but is used at a low volume. • Voiceover: Commentary throughout episode on topic of interest (usually onscreen). Style • David Attenborough uses an observational style, where he looks upon the animals and nature within the location that he is. David brings his own style into the mix, getting physically involved with the topics of the program and therefore breaking the convention of the observational style and taking on more of a participatory style.
  5. 5. David Attenborough – Life of Mammals In this documentary, David Attenborough travels across the world analysing various different mammals, using close-ups and macro camerawork to focus entirely on the animal. I really liked the use of the camerawork in this documentary, as David wasn’t involved in the shots where the main focus was an animal of interest. David commentated the history and used very analytical language to describe the animals of interest, prior to focusing on them and often showing a short montage of footage, displaying various different actions that the animal involves itself in to further compliment David’s points. The use of shots that David Attenborough is involved in are also very effective as it keeps the focus of the documentary on David Attenborough and his knowledge of the topics that he is mostly commentating on. In my documentary, I also intend on commentating the footage that I have collected to detach myself from being seen as a major role when focusing on the specific parts of the documentary – this way focusing less on me and more on the skateboarding. Sometimes I could involve myself, similarly to how David uses himself in the documentary in order to bring focus back to the topical progress that we are making as a group, therefore the viewers will also be involved with our documented journey. David Attenborough also uses music throughout his documentaries when studying his subjects and also during transitions. I hope to use a more low-tempo selection of music during our time-lapse footage to keep the pace slow during these periods. I have seen this effect used in the skateboarding film – Bon Voyage, in which the director has used time-lapses to show the transition from daytime to night-time footage. Pace changes can be very effective as it keeps the documentary interesting and appealing to the viewer as different paces work in different ways and therefore keeps the attention of the audience. Slow paces help to maintain a more calm atmosphere and exaggerates focus on the subject in the shot, whereas fast paced footage emphasises speed and promotes action in order to create a more energetic atmosphere.
  6. 6. Banksy – Exit Through the Gift Shop Genre – Lifestyle • Lifestyle genre, covering the life and style of graffiti artists. • Documentary mode – Participatory style. Audience • The audience of Exit Through the Gift Shop is aimed at a large amount of people with an interest in Banksy or graffiti art. • People with a general interest in art and graffiti. Camerawork • Point-of-view: Hand held and stationery. • Close-up: Analysing graffiti art and other areas of interest. • Longshot: Establishing location and showing various pieces of art. Audio • Music: Break-beat/drum and bass, used during various transitions throughout the documentary as background music. Due to the pace of the songs used, I feel it is used to exaggerate speed, as most of the transitional shots are shot outside of the car windows. In various parts of the documentary, the music is lowered in volume so that sounds from the raw footage is heard, such as speech. Style • The documentary takes on an participatory style, as it follows the main documenter Thierry Guetta and Banksy as they explain the past and current works of graffiti.
  7. 7. Banksy – Exit Through the Gift Shop In this documentary, Thierry Guetta - “an eccentric French shop keeper turned documentary maker attempts to locate and befriend Banksy” only to have the artist turn the camera back on its owner. The documentary includes footage of Banksy, Shepard Fairey, Invader and many of the world's most infamous graffiti artists at work, on walls and in interview. The main focus of the documentary is on the art produced by the people followed by Thierry, showing various montages of their work to show the viewers an example of what work they have produced. In many instances, the documentary uses interviews with Banksy to further reinforce Thierry’s points that he is talking about, giving the audience a further understanding of the thoughts behind the artwork, for example. This is very effective, as the interview segments of the film take up most of the documentary, whether it be both the imagery and audio or just the interview audio over other footage. I plan to use this in my documentary also, using the audio of the interview with clips from other films, showing imagery related to the topic of the interviewee’s response to our questions. The documentary also uses music throughout the documentary showing direct influence from the area that the film is shot, various different style of audio are used, supporting the theme of the graffiti life and also the location in which the art is placed. Many of the tracks used are of a breakbeat, jungle style of the drum and bass genre, which is usually related to areas in which gangs operate, such as Compton or Los Angeles County which is where some of the film takes place, showing graffiti history and culture. During interviewing scenes in the documentary, Banksy is sat in full disguise in front of a room full of his own artwork, including graffiti prints and models. Banksy is wearing fully black attire and therefore supports his anonymous image in the art scene (to avoid prosecution) alongside the clever choice of lighting which further covers his identity. The lights are lit up behind Banksy so that he is silhouetted and provides minimal detail to his figure – they also help to emphasise the background imagery and bring the audiences attention to them rather than to Banksy. This helps the audience concentrate on the artwork produced by him and shows that the artwork is truly more important than the artist. Although this makes the audience curious as to who he is, it signifies a very personal message to Banksy and shifts the usual importance from the artist towards the art. I plan to use this style of interview in my documentary, by placing images or objects of things in the backdrop, similar to the topic of the documentary – skating. This style is very likely to be used, to promote and express the documentary subject further and will hopefully make the background more appealing to the audience.
  8. 8. With my group’s documentary, controversy and potential censorship should not occur due to the topic of the film being in no way offensive and insulting towards the viewer. Although, if permission is not given to us to use footage or any other media that we intend to use then it could potentially be censored because of that. Censorship has taken a big role in the past in regards to documentaries. In the past large amounts of films have been banned for various reasons – usually ones of which depict conflicting topics, for example – conspiracies and religion. Zeitgeist was a documentary which was banned for its controversial topic of religion and theories based upon the topic. Various conspiracies were put forward and dissected and in many instances offended viewers which shortly led to its ban. Another example of a banned or controversial documentary is Conspiracy of Silence, a film about an “unspoken pact with the victim to stay silent about the crimes committed and in return the victim believes this lack of action will result in the avoidance of further violence”. This documentary was banned due to its conflicting theme around paedophiles and child sex abuse schemes. Due to the vast controversy of the film, it had publicity swept worldwide and caused mass attention, promoting the film for its conflicting theme.
  9. 9. The first time-lapse will be shot over the Maltby skate-park and will solely concentrate on the sunrise, in order to be used during the introduction scene of the documentary. Using the sunrise as a starting point it will represent a new day or start and will hopefully symbolize a true beginning to skateboarding. Over the top of the sunrise, the logo will appear and further support the introductory image. I also plan to shoot another time-lapse over a busy motorway from dusk to sunset, in order to be used as a transition from daytime to nighttime clips. The use of these clips will be to represent night-life and when used as a transition, the audience will be able to immediately recognise that it is night and the end of a scene. Long shots will also be used in the same location (Maltby Skate-park) to concentrate on various different points of the skate-park (such as the ‘bowl’ or the manual pad in the center. These shots will be used throughout the documentary in a similar way to this example, such as focusing on skaters on the park. By using this style of shot, more people can be in the frame and will hopefully emphasise the sense of community.
  10. 10. Props Skatestore The main location within the documentary is Props Skatestore in Rotherham, due to the main interest of the film being based around the owner of the store. Due to the topic of the documentary being based around skateboarding – Props Skatestore would be a great place to begin filming. In this location we plan for Tom Jones (the owner) to participate in an interview that will hopefully drive the film forward. We will be asking open questions in order for the answers to be less forced and more true to the person’s opinion, this way the documentary will be more genuine and seem a lot less pressured and more comfortable. Tom’s mass interest in the sport will allow the answers to be more in-depth and therefore gives us more direction when producing the documentary in regards to editing. My group and I also plan to film the interview with the background of the store in mind, strategically capturing skateboarding props in the frame in order to further emphasise and support the theme of the film. By filming within the store, the film will gain a more genuine feel and will allow viewers to distinguish from the footage, that it is in fact a store revolved around the sport. Due to the store being owned by Tom, he may also feel more comfortable filming in his own property and may give us more effective answers because of the more relaxed, genuine and suitable environment. As the shop is quite well lit, lighting will not be an issue if we shoot the footage in the direction of the sunlight. Although a potential issue of filming in a shop is customers, as many people could easily walk in during the interview. If this is the case then we have to make people aware that we are filming or we could ask if they could temporarily leave for the duration of the interview.
  11. 11. Maltby Skate-park Another location of the documentary that we intend to use is the local skate-park, as it gains a lot of community attention from local skaters and BMX riders alike. We plan to work here because we are very comfortable with the location and the visitors of the park and if we take our permission slips with us then we can get the opinion of various skateboarders within our community on the many questions we plan to ask. As the opinion of skateboarders is the main focus of the film, this location will be a very useful setting as long as permission slips are returned and therefore allows us to film. By having these opinions at hand, it gives a realistic perception of the local skateboarding community and allows the viewer to understand the current skating scene. The location of Maltby is a quiet, inactive town and doesn’t allow much diversity between people due to the lack of community support through a wide range of ages. The local skate-park however, allows various groups of people to meet and greet each other and therefore gain new friends, increasing their confidence and social skill. The skate-park is quite centrally based in the town and therefore beneficial to the community, as it can be used as an ‘escape’ from anti-social behaviour. Sounds such as traffic and talking shouldn’t be an issue during filming at this location, as it will make the atmosphere more genuine and the participants will be more comfortable if they can act naturally without the restraints of necessary direction set by us. In order to gain the best audio quality possible, we plan to use a boom microphone to reduce the sound of wind buffering and will help direct sound to the audience. We also plan to film our time-lapse here, therefore reinforcing the link between our documentary’s topic directly to the local skateboarding scene. Capturing the sunrise scene at the local skate-park would also set the location for the film and theme of skateboarding.
  12. 12. In the documentary, I would like to use conventional shots to support the vast amount of skateboarding videos out today. Currently, we have done some research into common skateboarding shots, such as close-ups on the deck and movement of the user’s feet and mid-shots to show the deck, floor and leg and foot movement of the skater. From researching into the style of filming that takes place during a skateboarding film or documentary, we have noticed that there is a conventional style that is used in various different films that I have looked at. This method of filming involves the cameramen on skateboards, following the main skater’s ‘line’ as they show tricks – unfortunately for us, this could be a problem as it is the first time that my group will have encountered this style of filming and could easily cause error and may not achieve the effect that we wanted to. This is a common method of filming and is very effective, as it keeps the cameraman close to the skater and can help show the technical footwork of skateboarding. Also, as a luxury to producers of skating videos, a fish-eye lens is used in a wide majority of amateur skateboarding videos. This method of filming is often conventionally related to this sport and during the use of the lens, it is mostly used to accentuate curves of skateboarding ramps and bring the skateboarder into direct attention of the viewer. Multiple exposure shot Long shot Long shot Low angle shot Long angle shot Multiple exposure shot: A multiple exposure is the superimposition of two or more exposures to create a single image, and double exposure has a corresponding meaning in respect of two images. I would have to use this shot as a still image as it is only achievable this way and I would possibly question using this as a transition or during an introductory scene. Low angle shot: This shot emphasises the size of the board and concentrates focus onto the feet of the skater and the technicality of the tricks they are performing. This is conventionally used on stairways, to exaggerate height and distance jumped when the skater leaves the floor to perform a trick. An issue with this shot would be that if the skateboarder manages to fall from the board during the trick, due to my position with the camera the participant could easily hit the equipment. Tracking (camera movement): Following the skater’s ‘line’, this camera movement tracks the skater’s trick from start to finish, rather than concentrating on one point of the allocated trick spot. When shot from a low/mid angle, the shot can help exaggerate the length of a rail, for example, making the skater seem to have travelled a further distance. Using tracking throughout the documentary would follow the conventional filming style of skateboarding and if used, will further enforce this.
  13. 13. Gaining permission from various different parties was essential during the planning stage of our production as we have to ensure that the participants of our documentary have given us the right to have been involved on camera or use their music. In order to have the right to use Gnarwolves’ music in our documentary, we contacted the head of their record label – Andrej Presern and asked if we could use the songs that we have white-listed for use in the documentary. We got hold of the necessary email address to contact the manager and messaged Andrej, giving a brief description of what we intend on using the songs for and also specified the songs that we wish to use. Luckily, Andrej replied almost instantly, giving us permission to use the songs ‘History Is Bunk’ and ‘Oh, Brave New World’ as well as providing lossless versions of the songs that we could use, entirely free of charge. Another form of gaining permission from participants is through our consent forms, which people need to fill in with the necessary information and agreements in order for us to use them in the film. This is an effective way of gaining permission and is very simple, allowing people of almost any age to fill it in accordingly. The permission slips that we have created ask for permission to participate in the documentary, whether we can edit and manipulate the footage in which they are involved and finally we asked, if they wished to see the footage before it is finalised. Due to a large amount of the people involved with skateboarding being under 18, the consent forms will need to be used by us at various points. Under 18 year olds will need parental permission in order to be involved with the documentary and for footage to be used which they are included within. When our group is capturing footage at Maltby Skate-park, we will need to hand out permission slips to any people under 18 in order for us to be able to use the footage in the final documentary. This could also raise issues, as the permission slip will need to be filled in by parents of the child and returned before we can edit the footage with the person involved.
  14. 14. All locations in which filming will take place must be checked for areas which could potentially put participants at risk. As our group films in these locations, we are given the responsibility to ensure that all of the participants of the film are safe and in no way at risk of injury. Due to skateboarding being quite an injury-prone sport with newbies, people may get injured simply from participating when skating. As we can not entirely ensure the safety of new skateboarders from injury, risk assessing to the best of our ability to reduce any unnecessary fault would need to take place prior to filming. The weather is also a big risk to take into account when we want to film at the skateboard. As the danger of the sport is potentially high, simply based on the nature of skateboarding, we need to ensure that the skate-park is not wet and dangerous to the riders.
  15. 15. In my mood board, I have shown various photos and scenes of filming techniques for skateboarding and interviewing. All of the images of skateboarding represent the style of shots that are conventionally used during skating documentary and films. These shots are often filmed from a wide angle to keep the whole body of the skateboarder in the frame and helps emphasise the relationship between the rider and the board and concentrates on the entire image rather than a certain area – such as the footwork or the subject himself. I plan to use these types of shots in our documentary to further enforce the theme of skateboarding, following the conventional form of filming used in many other skating films and various other documentaries. I also included images from interviews that have been used in documentaries, this was to help increase my knowledge on the style of filming of interviews in this type of film. Various examples positioned the interviewee using the rule of thirds, positioning them in either the left, right or centre of the shot. In many cases, the interviewee was placed to the left or right hand side of the screen, which showed enough of the background for the audience to establish the location of the interview. I plan to also follow this convention, to ensure that the viewer understands that this section of the film is indeed an interview. By positioning the interviewee in one of the thirds of the documentary, a banner or other form of introducing the subject can be used, establishing whom the interviewee is. In the mood board, I also placed images of time-lapses which follow a similar theme which I would like to follow. The shots that I have included show sunrises and sunsets, both of which I would like to use as transitional time-lapses if I see fit. The time-lapses I plan to film would be used as transitions between one clip to another to represent a change in time and pace – this way, I can also change the music in conjunction with these areas of the documentary to further support this.
  16. 16. Intro – We plan to use a photo montage to introduce the documentary, using images of skateboarders and skate-parks to establish the topic of the film, making the audience aware of this instantly. Following this montage, me and my group plan to establish location using a time-lapse of the sunrise over the local skate-park. We want the time-lapse to represent the beginning of the documentary and the start of a new day, as we plan for the film to flow as if it was filmed in one day. Interview – Show clip of Tom, interview audio over footage, cross-fade into interview clips. (Shoot interview from front and side). The interview with Tom Jones will take place in the Props Skatestore in Rotherham – when editing, we plan to have audio (Gnarwolves) running in the background throughout the entirety of the interview. In some cases, we have planned to cut some of the interview footage out and replace it with external footage, showing content with relation to Tom’s response to our questions. We also plan to show viewpoints from various other sources – such as students and skateboarders within our community and getting their opinion on the sport using similar questions to the ones we asked Tom Jones. Transitions – In many cases, our documentary will need some sort of transition from one clip to another in order to reduce the amount that the footage cuts bluntly and continues to the following clip. We plan to use time-lapses as a possible transition, in order to represent a change in time and emphasise a decrease in pace from one place of time to another. To visually represent travel from our hometown to Props and various other areas, we plan to capture moving traffic or trains. This will hopefully help the audience understand that we are travelling and we plan for the use of this to make the transition between one destination to the next more flowing and smooth, also making it more interesting to watch.
  17. 17. In the documentary, we plan to use tracks from a pop-punk band named Gnarwolves due to their direct connection with the skateboarding scene and style of music. Gnarwolves are a well known band with the skating community due to their choice of genre and the topics they choose to speak about in their music. Due to their large skateboarding following, their music is often related to the sport mostly because multiple members of the band skate themselves and the band has been largely influenced by the ‘skateboarding lifestyle’. Many songs from the ‘Cru’ EP are fast-paced and up-tempo which suits the skating theme and character of the sport. During the documentary, I can reinforce the theme of film by using the bands music and further emphasise the personality and style of the sport. I plan to use the up-tempo songs in areas of fast movement, such as scenes of skateboarders pulling off tricks or simply travelling on their boards. As the band perform a highly recognisable style of music that is related to skateboarding, I am hoping that the audience make the link between the sport and the soundtrack, otherwise it will just be disregarded. If the audience do not understand why the music is used and the theme of the songs are not clearly shown, then the purpose of using this particular soundtrack would be beneficial to the documentary.
  18. 18. All of the people within the documentary are either to be interviewed or filmed skating. The main focus of the documentary is the interview – Tom Jones and the questions that he is answering. Tom will have the most screen time on the film during the interview that we have organised, this will enable us to gain a suitable amount of footage to use and edit. During various parts in the documentary, the interview will cut to clips of the Maltby Skatepark, including participating skateboarders. Spontaneously using the consent forms that we have produced, we can take the necessary action to gain permission from the chosen roles. In various cases throughout the film, we plan to feature people that we are familiar with who also enjoy or practice skateboarding. We also plan on interviewing the people who aren’t familiar with skateboarding and may see the sport from a more stereotypical viewpoint and therefore allows the documentary to open up to a broader thought base.
  19. 19. There are not any set costumes in the documentary as we want the skateboarding attire in the film to be as genuine as possible. The clothes they wear are just as important to the documentary as the music used and the shots involved throughout as they convey the skating image that we want to come across through the film. If we don’t set a style of clothing for the participants to wear, then it allows them to dress genuinely and therefore gives an accurate interpretation of what skaters wear for the viewers to pick up on. This will make the whole of the documentary seem more genuine along with the use of music and the style of filming and will overall benefit the film hugely. Props are also a part of the documentary that will not be set in any way, in order to keep the skateboarding vibe as genuine as possible. The props will possibly consist of such things as skateboarders, wheels, trucks and various skateboarding tools which signify skateboarding in a simple, representative form. If we don’t place any props purposely and at our own accord then the whole feel of the documentary will seem more genuine and therefore accurately representing skateboarding as what it truly is. By combining our lack of control over costumes and props when filming, the whole feel of the documentary will be more comfortable and relaxed and will hopefully come across through our footage.
  20. 20. I have used specific shots throughout the documentary to compliment the theme of certain scenes. During the interview with Tom Jones, we fixed him in the centre of the shot to ensure that the focus of the scene was entirely on Tom. Further analysing this shot, it also consisted of a small focus on background imagery, purposely capturing the television displaying skateboard footage to further set the theme and to enforce the purpose of the interview. Although the choice of backdrop is beneficial to the interview, it is quite distracting to the eye and the audience may lose concentration on the interviewee. Other shots, such as the establishing shot midway through the introduction show Rotherham, establishing location and the general area of the setting of the documentary. By using a landmark such as the Rotherham Train Station, it sets location through its image and title that we showed within the shot to further emphasise its purpose in the film.
  21. 21. Development Originally, the documentary was going to be based on the history of skateboarding, including an in-depth analysis of a handful of skaters such as Tony Hawk, Ryan Sheckler, Paul Rodriguez and Rodney Mullen. The documentary has subsequently changed to show the current day of skateboarding and what it is like now, rather than showing the history. Various changes have taken place during the production of the documentary, including the name – to start with, the feature was entitled “And Now We’re Here” to imply that the documentary was taking a historical look on a specific subject up until the present. During this development period, we decided on a title for the documentary based on a quote that we found in an issue of Thrasher: Skateboarding Magazine during an interview with Rodney Mullen – “skateboarding drove my life forward, and well, now we’re here”. We wanted to use the title ‘And Now We’re Here’, but it felt long-winded and was very vague, as it didn’t direct the audience to a possible skateboarding theme. Once we had created a logo and draft intro, we eventually decided against using it due to these reasons. Recently we have changed the name to be “No Comply”, a very direct skateboarding term due to its name revolving around a skating trick. This title also support the stereotypical ‘no compliance’ of skateboarders and can be very directly related to the meaning behind punk music from the 70’s era – anarchism. The documentary is solely based on the current skateboarding scene now, but also bringing in hints of the history of skateboarding in relation to the various different questions asked during our interviews. We wanted a title that was directly connected to the skateboarding theme we were hoping to portray and so we researched into skating tricks and slang to try and find a potential title that would relate to the sport and also is meaningful to the theme. We eventually stumbled across the term – ‘No Comply’, which is a skating trick but also has a suitable meaning for the topic. The stereotypical image of ‘no compliance’ if often related to ‘old-school’ skateboarding during the punk era in the 70’s, as skaters were often viewed as non-compliant to the law and took on quite an anarchist nature. We also decided to take on a narrative structure and where to use what segments of clips, along with what music to use at certain points and also where it would be necessary to use editing effects. We have also noted how long various clips will last and started to create a mental draft of what we would like the intro to include and also what content we would like included throughout the entirety of the documentary.
  22. 22. Our group prepared a blog at the following address - http://bit.ly/170pgud, which we produced in order to maximise the audience feedback available to us. Joe Hinch wrote the blog entry, explaining the project and what has been achieved this far. On the introductory page of the blog, the comments section is open to everyone and allows them to post feedback based on the information that we have posted. This allows the audience to interact with us and allow us to adapt our ideas based on their feedback. By opening the page up to the public, it allows the blog to gain exposure and gain the most attention as possible which may include positive or negative feedback or potential criticisms and ideas that we could take on-board to potentially improve our documentary. “No comments have been left yet” Due to the lack of audience reaction, we had no feedback to work off in regards around opinions. As the No Comply blog entry is hard to find on the website, I feel this was an issue. The navigation towards the blog was really difficult and in an area of the site that doesn’t gain much attention, meaning audience feedback could be hard to come by and therefore restricting our audience interaction. Any audience interaction would be beneficial, as we then get to hear what issues and opinions that the audience have based on the work that we have produced so far. Social Networking The support of social networking would be very beneficial to us, as a wider range of people can be asked about the documentary. Friends, family and acquaintances would be able to view the post and also share them on their own pages – whether it be on Facebook, Twitter and Tumblr. Due to the limitations of the use of social network sites within our school, students would not be able to see the post until they got home or checked their pages during the day. This could be a problem, as it only gives us a small time frame for the maximum amount of people to see it, further limiting our reach.
  23. 23. If the answers given are in-depth then we have more to work with when editing, allowing us to pick the best bits of the footage we have to gain the most information and therefore produce a more educational and eye-opening film into the present skateboarding community. Due to the five minute time limit on this project, cropping the footage and basically cutting the answers down was an annoyance. The interview itself was eight minutes and shortening the footage was quite a task - during the process I had to pick the most authentic and beneficial parts of Tom’s answers to use in the documentary. Although I first felt that this process was frustrating and unnecessary, I now feel that the documentary runs smoother and more fluid because the questions are answered almost immediately and therefore seems that Tom doesn’t dwell on the question. In some cases, Tom elaborated on the question and went into more depth of his own accord and we ended up with a lot better answer than first anticipated, which we eventually used without cropping any of the footage down. In some areas, during the interview with Tom Jones, we plan to cut away the footage of the interview at various times to further support what Tom is talking about. This will help give the viewer a visual representation of the response he has given to the question and hopefully further expand the audience’s knowledge of skateboarding.

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