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Friction! It's what's killing your online donations
 

Friction! It's what's killing your online donations

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What's holding back your online fundraising? It may be your fundraising pages. ...

What's holding back your online fundraising? It may be your fundraising pages.

Speaking on April 8, 2013 at the Association of Fundraising Professionals International Conference in San Diego, Tim Kachuriak, Dan Gillette, and Nathaniel Ward explained using case studies how the design and content on your pages may be holding back your supporters from making a donation online. The solution? Eliminate this "friction" from your fundraising pages and you could see a marked lift in your results.

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  • When I arrive at this site for the first time, there is really a lot going on. How to Give, What to Support, Why Giving Matters– all good content, but I arrived at this page because I clicked on a link on another page to GIVE. My motivation is ALREADY to GIVE– all of this other content actually can prove to be quite distracting and MAY even make me change my mind. The option to MAKE a GIFT is very small and is outside of the primary Eye-path.
  • Already we reach decision point that produces significant friction. I arrived here with the INTENTION of giving a gift to Stanford. But now I have all of these other decisions to make. I have to pick a school or group, I have to select what type of gift I will give, and the source of payment. All of these factors may be important, but they occur so early in the process that it begins to reduce my motivation– I had no idea there was so much to consider!
  • Without a description of why it matters where my gift is designated, this just adds unnecessary friction to the giving process.
  • This description actually just adds anxiety– If I select a designation here, I may be asked more questions as I get further into the process– Oh, man– and I really need to get back to work– I may not have time to do this right now…
  • Although the descriptions are helpful, the fact that my selected gift designation does not accept my gift type is EXTREMELY frustrating. No, I don ’t want to call an talk to the “gift processing staff”– that’s why I went online– I THOUGHT it would be easier!! Any by the way, why does Stanford have an entire STAFF dedicated just to gift processing– maybe if they made it easier and more efficient they could save the expense.
  • What ’s a security transfer? Why don’t you take Discover? This is all stressing me out– Sheesh– I’m only at STEP 1 of 5!!!! Maybe I’ll just wait and do this some other time…
  • Oh my! I can ’t even read all of the options…
  • What does that mean– joint gift with spouse/partner? What ’s the difference between In Honor of or In Memory of? I wasn’t thinking about those things when I came here to make my gift, but now that you introduce those questions, I may want to think about them. I may want to talk to my spouse/partner. I may want to consider who I can make my gift in honor of. I may even want to contemplate whether or not I want this gift to be anonymous.
  • What???
  • This may be asking this information because a few steps ago I selected that I wanted this donation to be a joint gift with my spouse/partner. BUT– this adds a lot of friction to the process– why do you need to know my wife ’s name? Are you going to start soliciting her too? She may not like that.
  • So…where do I give? --where your donations go? (great, but I want to donate) --Search for a student or group (don ’t really know what that means…just trying to donate) --For Participants– to search for your page, click here (I don ’t want to click there, I just want to donate) --search for a group page (what are you talking about???) --Sign up? (NO– I ’m just trying to freakin donate!!) --Or, get more info! (ARRGGGHHH!!!) --Other ways to give—Discover more ways to help (I guess this is it)
  • So…where do I give? --where your donations go? (great, but I want to donate) --Search for a student or group (don ’t really know what that means…just trying to donate) --For Participants– to search for your page, click here (I don ’t want to click there, I just want to donate) --search for a group page (what are you talking about???) --Sign up? (NO– I ’m just trying to freakin donate!!) --Or, get more info! (ARRGGGHHH!!!) --Other ways to give—Discover more ways to help (I guess this is it)

Friction! It's what's killing your online donations Friction! It's what's killing your online donations Presentation Transcript

  • FRICTION! It’sWhat’s Killing YourOnline Donations
  • Friction: Defined/ frikSH n/ Noun.ˈ əThe resistance that one surface or objectencounters when moving over another.
  • Examples of FrictionSander on a Piece of Wood = High Degree of Friction
  • Examples of FrictionPuck on Ice Rink = Low Degree of Friction
  • Friction in the online givingprocess is best understoodwhen it is experienced.
  • Friction Example #1: Stanford University
  • Friction Example #2: World Vision
  • Click Count:1
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  • Donors Don’t Like Friction
  • Friction in the Online Giving Process: Defined/ frikSH n/ Noun.ˈ əAnything that causes psychological resistance to agiven element in the online donation process.
  • Identifying types of friction in theonline giving process.
  • Types of FrictionFsc = lT + dT©Copyright © MECLABSExamples of Length (lT)• Page-Length Friction• Steps Friction• Field Number Friction• Field Layout FrictionExamples of Difficulty (dT)• Decision Friction• Confusion Friction• Error Friction• Waiting Friction
  • Field Number FrictionA donation form with an exorbitantnumber of fields adds unwantedfriction to the giving process.
  • Field Number FrictionA donation form with an exorbitantnumber of fields adds unwantedfriction to the giving process.
  • Steps FrictionA donation form with too manysteps adds extra friction to thegiving process.
  • Decision FrictionUnnecessary friction in the givingprocess is introduced when donorsare forced to make unanticipateddecisions about their donation.
  • Confusion FrictionUsing organization-centriclanguage or “inside baseball,” ormultiple conflicting calls to actionelicits confusion that createsfriction in the online giving process.
  • Error FrictionUsing cryptic error messages orrequiring users to re-enterinformation adds significantfriction to the online givingprocess.
  • Error FrictionUsing cryptic error messages orrequiring users to re-enterinformation adds significantfriction to the online givingprocess.
  • Device FrictionHaving to “pinch and zoom” inorder to make a donation on amobile device adds friction to themobile donation process.
  • Focus FrictionFriction enters the online givingprocess when it is unclear where toclick to make a donation.
  • Registration FrictionRequiring account registrationslows down the donation processby adding unnecessary friction tothe online donation process.
  • 5 steps to reduce friction inyour online giving experience
  • What’s your goal?What’s your goal?Photo: Flickr/Roger Smith
  • Step 1: Identify your goalWithout a goal, you can’ttell what’s helping orhurting conversionAsk yourself: What is thesingle most important thingyour donation form shouldachieve?It’s “make money” right?
  • Specifically: Your number one goal
  • You can’t fixwhat you can’tmeasurePhoto: Flickr/Lucy.Bold
  • Step 2: Make sure you measure your resultsYou need 1) donation and e-mail tools that allow trackingand 2) a tracking service like Google Analytics
  • Enable e-commerce tracking in AnalyticsMake sure you’re trackingrevenue, not just visitors1.Click “admin” in the top bar2.Click “profile settings”3.Select “yes, an e-commerce site”4.Follow setup instructions to addthe appropriate tracking codes toyour site. (May requireprogrammers.)
  • Use Google’s tracking codesAdd tracking codes to every e-mail, banner, and social media linkDrill down into results and effectiveness by:•Campaign•Medium•Creative variantYour final code will look like this:http://www.url.org/?utm_source=Conference&utm_medium=Email&utm_content=Slide&utm_campaign=AFPGoogle “URL Builder” is an easy tool to help you create these
  • This is how your reports should look
  • And now for something completely differentAnd now for something completely different
  • Step 3: Implement a radical redesignthat reduces frictionGo big or go homeFor your test to get a meaningful lift, your redesign shouldbe meaningfully different.Fiddling around the edges only gets you so far.Small changes can have a big impact, but incrementalchanges will likely be small.
  • How to cut length frictionReduce the number of questionsand steps. Cut liberally!•Ask yourself: is this somethingrequired for this transaction?•Think back to your goal. Does thisstep or question help achieve thatgoal?In general, every click to a new pagereduces conversion by 50%!
  • How to cut difficulty frictionFind anything that makes your donor stop and think. Cut it.•Remove needless gift designations•Make sure errors are handled nicely•Is it clear how the donor goes to the next step? Really?•Allow your donors to give without registration.
  • How to cut difficulty frictionMore ways to reduce difficulty•Does your page take more than 3 seconds toload?At 4 seconds, 25% of page visitors willabandon you•Do your supporters have to pinch and zoom todonate on their mobile device?They shouldn’t have to.Source: http://www.fastcompany.com/1825005/how-one-second-could-cost-amazon-16-billion-sales
  • Find out the truth aboutwhat really worksPhoto: Flickr/Winnifredxoxo
  • Step 4: Run an A/B split testRandomly display both versions of your page to visitors to seewhich performs best against your goal.
  • Setting up the test in Google Analytics2. Set up the test by pastingeach version into a newexperiment3. Deploy the additional trackingcode to the default landingpage4. Confirm the test is deployedcorrectlyHow to set up your test in GoogleAnalytics1.Configure your goal
  • Yes, there’smathinvolved.Sorry,but it’simportant
  • Step 5: Validate your resultsYou want your experiment to be repeatableAim for 95% level of confidenceUse the MECLABS validation toolIf the test fails to get a lift…Use data to find out why
  • The ultimate reason we learnSo we can failAnd then learn from that failure
  • Reducing friction has adisproportionate impact onROI.
  • Version BVersion A74% Increasein Donor Conversion274% Increasein Revenue
  • Version BVersion A137.8% Increasein Donor Conversion
  • Version BVersion A67% Increasein Donor Conversion
  • Where are you leakingdonations?
  • Self AssessmentIf you score more than 3,then you may have toomuch friction in youronline giving process.
  • End PageSPEAKER INFORMATION