How did World War I begin?

Called the Great War until World War II (1939–45), World War I (1914–18) was
sparked by the as...
Salonika in 1916–1917 on unrelated false charges[; Serbia executed the top three
military conspirators. Much of what is kn...
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How Did World War I Begin

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this document explains which was the main cause why did World War I begin.

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How Did World War I Begin

  1. 1. How did World War I begin? Called the Great War until World War II (1939–45), World War I (1914–18) was sparked by the assassination of Archduke Francis Ferdinand of Austria-Hungary (1863– 1914) on June 28, 1914. Ferdinand was shot by Serbian political activist Gvrilo Princip (1894–1918) in Sarajevo, which was then the capital of Austria-Hungary's province of Bosnia-Herzegovina. Princip assassinated the archduke because Ferdinand angered Serbian nationalists, among others, when he tried to expand the Austro-Hungarian monarchy into a triple monarchy that included a Slavic kingdom under Croatian leadership. Since Princip was known to have ties to a Serbian terrorist organization, Austria-Hungary declared war on Serbia. Both sides believed the battle would be decided quickly. Instead the warfare spread, eventually involving more countries and lasting for four years. World War I was considered to be the war to end all wars... Assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria The assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria, which led to the outbreak of World War I, occurred on 28 June 1914 in Sarajevo, then part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Franz Ferdinand, heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne, was traveling with his wife Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg in an open-topped car when both were shot dead by Gavrilo Princip, one of a group of six assassins coordinated by Danilo Ilić. The political objective of the assassination was to break Austria-Hungary's south-Slav provinces off so they could be combined into a Greater Serbia or a Yugoslavia. The assassins' motives were consistent with the movement that later became known as Young Bosnia. At the top of these Serbian military conspirators was Chief of Serbian Military Intelligence Dragutin Dimitrijević, his right hand man Major Vojislav Tankosić, and Masterspy Rade Malobabić. Major Tankosić armed (with bombs and pistols) and trained the assassins, and the assassins were given access to the same underground railroad that Rade Malobabić used for the infiltration of weapons and operatives into Austria-Hungary. The assassins, the key members of the underground railway, and the key Serbian military conspirators who were still alive were arrested, tried, convicted and punished. Those who were arrested in Bosnia were tried in Sarajevo in October 1914. The other conspirators were arrested and tried before a Serbian kangaroo court in French-occupied
  2. 2. Salonika in 1916–1917 on unrelated false charges[; Serbia executed the top three military conspirators. Much of what is known about the assassinations comes from these two trials and related records. Assignment of responsibility for the bombing and murders of 28 June is highly controversial because the attack led to the outbreak of World War I one month later. An evidential approach must be taken to weed through the various claims and counter- claims concerning responsibility. ANSWER THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS: 1. How did World War I begin? 2. Who was Francis Ferdinand? 3. Which was the political objective of the assassination? 4. Who assassinate Francis Ferdinand? 5. When did World War I begin?

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