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11 e1ws4

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  • 1. Electric Charge Behavior and Interactions Model Worksheet 4: Electric Fields The electric field is the amount of electric force per Coulomb of charge, E = Fe/q. Once the electric field from one or more source charges is known, the force on any charge placed within the field can be determined by the calculation Fe = E*q. The electric field is analogous to the gravitational field. The gravitational force per unit of mass is called the gravitational field strength. (i.e. 9.8 Newtons of force on each kilogram of mass near the surface of the earth.) Now we are investigating the electric force per unit of charge, or electric field strength. For example, three meters away from one Coulomb of charge, the electric field strength is one billion Newtons of force on each Coulomb of charge. Electric field lines are a visual way of summarizing the magnitude and direction of the electric force on a positively charged particle throughout a region. Although an infinite number of field lines could be drawn, generally just a few are drawn to see the pattern. The electric force is always tangent to the field lines. The force is strongest where the field lines are closest together. Electric field lines start on positive charge and end on negative charge and never intersect one another.1. The figure on the right shows strongly charged source charges Y and Z that are fixed in place. Test charge X is free to move and has a small positive charge. Initially sphere X is equidistant from spheres Y and Z. a. Which path will test charge X initially follow? b. Explain why you chose that path. c. Draw an electric field line due to source charges Y and Z that passes through charge X.2. Three charged particles are placed in an electric field as shown in the diagram. a. Assuming that A has a positive charge, draw a vector for the electric force on point A. How do you know the direction of the force? b. Assuming that B has a positive charge, draw a vector for the electric force on point B. How do you know the direction of the force? c. Assuming that C has a negative charge, draw a vector for the electric force on point C. How do you know the direction of the force? d. Which of the three points will have the strongest force per charge ratio? Explain how you know.©Modeling Workshop Project 2007 1 E1-Charge&Field - ws 4 v3.1 JBS
  • 2. 3. Suppose you are given an electric field, but the charges that produce the field are hidden. If a positive test charge brought into the region shows that all the field lines point into the hidden region, what can you say about the sign of the charge in that region? How do you know?4. Find the electric force on a charge of +4.0 x 10-3 C when it is in an electric field at a point where the electric field strength is 20.0 N/C.5. A negative charge of 2.0 x 10-8 C experiences a force of 0.060 N when in an electric field. How strong is the electric field at the point where the charge is located?6. How much charge does a particle have that experiences a force of 1.0 x 10-8 N at a point where the electric field intensity is 0.00020 N/C?©Modeling Workshop Project 2007 2 E1-Charge&Field - ws 4 v3.1 JBS
  • 3. 7. a. Sketch the electric field created by the group of positive source charges shown below (ignore test charges A, B, and C for the moment.) Use arrows on field lines to show the direction of the field. b. Test charge particles A, B, and C are shot to the right. Predict and draw the path each particle will take. c. Where in the electric field will the particle’s paths be bent the most? A + B + + + C + + + + + test charges source charges8. a. Sketch the electric field created by the large positive and negative source charges shown below. Use arrows on field lines to show the direction of the field. b. Indicate the direction and size of the electric force on test charges A, B, and C with vectors. c. How does the direction of the force on test charges A, B, and C relate to the field lines? C + A + B +©Modeling Workshop Project 2007 3 E1-Charge&Field - ws 4 v3.1 JBS
  • 4. 9. Draw the electric field lines around the positively charged plate. Draw the path that thenegatively charged particle below the plate would take after being shot with an initial velocity to theright. What will happen to the vertical velocity of the negatively charged particle as it follows thepath you drew? ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ +++++++++10. The three particles shown have equal velocities to the right. B’s velocity allows the particle to travel in a circle around the negatively charged particle. a. Draw the electric field lines due to the negative charge. Use arrows on field lines to show the direction of the field. b. Draw and label a force diagram for test charge A. c. Use your knowledge of Coulomb’s law and circular motion to predict and draw the paths of test charges A and C. A + 2r B + r C + r/2 d. Do the paths of the positively charged test particles follow the electric field lines?©Modeling Workshop Project 2007 4 E1-Charge&Field - ws 4 v3.1 JBS