Time for Naturein the St Clair Ravine, Toronto          by Rachel Naipaul Photos taken on Galaxy Nexus Phone     edited us...
Time for nature rachel naipaul
Time for nature rachel naipaul
Time for nature rachel naipaul
Time for nature rachel naipaul
Time for nature rachel naipaul
Time for nature rachel naipaul
Time for nature rachel naipaul
Time for nature rachel naipaul
Time for nature rachel naipaul
Time for nature rachel naipaul
Time for nature rachel naipaul
Time for nature rachel naipaul
Time for nature rachel naipaul
Time for nature rachel naipaul
Time for nature rachel naipaul
Time for nature rachel naipaul
Time for nature rachel naipaul
Time for nature rachel naipaul
Time for nature rachel naipaul
Time for nature rachel naipaul
Time for nature rachel naipaul
Time for nature rachel naipaul
Time for nature rachel naipaul
Time for nature rachel naipaul
Time for nature rachel naipaul
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Time for nature rachel naipaul

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  • Walkway in the Ravine
  • Walkway...in the Ravine
  • Stairs..in the Ravine
  • Underside of the St. Clair Overpass..in the Ravine
  • Underside of the St. Clair Overpass..in the Ravine
  • I just love lovelove MOSS  ..in the Ravine
  • I don’t know why there’s Sand in the Tree Trunk...but there is.. In the Ravine
  • Tree Roots and stuff..in the Ravine
  • Decomposing Tree Trunks and Moss...in the Ravine
  • Fallen Trees decomposing.. In the Ravine
  • Grassy-looking Plants.. In the Ravine
  • A Patch of ??? In the Ravine
  • Walkway in the Ravine
  • In the Ravine
  • A MASSIVE Fallen Tree..in the Ravine
  • Creek in the Ravine
  • Creek in the Ravine
  • Water hemlock or Water Parsnip...don’t eat these..they’re quite deadly!!In the Ravine
  • A Field of Plantain – in the Ravine. Latin Name: Plantago Major. Plantain is edible and medicinal, the young leaves are edible raw in salad or cooked as a pot herb, they are very rich in vitamin B1 and riboflavin. The herb has a long history of use as an alternative medicine dating back to ancient times. Being used as a panacea (medicinal for everything) in some cultures, one American Indian name for the plant translates to "life medicine." And recent research indicates that this name may not be far from true! The chemical analysis of Plantgo Major reveals the remarkable glycoside Aucubin. Acubin has been reported in the Journal Of Toxicology as a powerful anti-toxin. There are many more highly effective constituents in this plant including Ascorbic-acid, Apigenin, Baicalein, Benzoic-acid, Chlorogenic-acid, Citric-acid, Ferulic-acid, Oleanolic-acid, Salicylic-acid, and Ursolic-acid. The leaves and the seed are medicinal used as an antibacterial, antidote, astringent, antiinflammatory, antiseptic, antitussive, cardiac, demulcent, diuretic, expectorant, haemostatic, laxative, ophthalmic, poultice, refrigerant, and vermifuge. Medical evidence exists to confirm uses as an alternative medicine for asthma, emphysema, bladder problems, bronchitis, fever, hypertension, rheumatism and blood sugar control. A decoction of the roots is used in the treatment of a wide range of complaints including diarrhoea, dysentery, gastritis, peptic ulcers, irritable bowel syndrome, haemorrhage, haemorrhoids, cystitis, bronchitis, catarrh, sinusitis, coughs, asthma and hay fever. It also causes a natural aversion to tobacco and is currently being used in stop smoking preparations. Extracts of the plant have antibacterial activity, it is a safe and effective treatment for bleeding, it quickly stops blood flow and encourages the repair of damaged tissue. The heated leaves are used as a wet dressing for wounds, skin inflammations, malignant ulcers, cuts, stings and swellings and said to promote healing without scars. Poultice of hot leaves is bound onto cuts and wounds to draw out thorns, splinters and inflammation. The root is said to be used as an anti-venom for rattlesnakes bites. Plantain seeds contain up to 30% mucilage which swells in the gut, acting as a bulk laxative and soothing irritated membranes. The seeds are used in the treatment of parasitic worms. A distilled water made from the plant makes an excellent eye lotion.Plantain Herbal Folklore and HistoryNative Americans carried powdered roots of Plantain as protection against snakebites or to ward off snakes. Plantain was called Englishman's Foot or White Man's Foot as it was said to grow where ever their feet touched the ground - this is referred to in Longfellow’s 'Hiawatha.'. Some old European lore states that Plantain is effective for the bites of mad dogs, epilepsy, and leprosy. In the United States the plant was called 'Snake Weed,' from a belief in its efficacy in cases of bites from venomous creatures. Plantain Recipes"Medicinal" herb tea: For colds and flu use 1 tbls. dry or fresh whole Plantain (seed, root, and leaves) to 1 cup boiling water, steep 10 min. strain, sweeten. Drink through the day.Healing salve: In large non-metallic pan place 1lb. of entire Plantain plant chopped, and 1 cup lard, cover, cook down on low heat till all is mushy and green. Strain while hot, cool and use for burns, insect bites, rashes, and all sores. Note: used as night cream for wrinkles.
  • Burdock! Latin Name: ArctiumLappa. Medicinal Action and Uses - Alterative, diuretic and diaphoretic. One of the best blood purifiers. In all skin diseases, it is a certain remedy and has effected a cure in many cases of eczema, either taken alone or combined with other remedies, such as Yellow Dock and Sarsaparilla. The root is principally employed, but the leaves and seeds are equally valuable. Both root and seeds may be taken as a decoction of 1 OZ. to 1 1/2 pint of water, boiled down to a pint, in doses of a wineglassful, three or four times a day. The anti-scorbutic properties of the root make the decoction very useful for boils, scurvy and rheumatic affections, and by many it is considered superior to Sarsaparilla, on account of its mucilaginous, demulcent nature; it has in addition been recommended for external use as a wash for ulcers and scaly skin disorders. An infusion of the leaves is useful to impart strength and tone to the stomach, for some forms of long-standing indigestion. When applied externally as a poultice, the leaves are highly resolvent for tumours and gouty swellings, and relieve bruises and inflamed surfaces generally. The bruised leaves have been applied by the peasantry in many countries as cataplasms to the feet and as a remedy for hysterical disorders. From the seeds, both a medicinal tincture and a fluid extract are prepared, of benefit in chronic skin diseases. Americans use the seeds only, considering them more efficacious and prompt in their action than the other parts of the plant. They are relaxant and demulcent, with a limited amount of tonic property. Their influence upon the skin is due largely to their being of such an oily nature: they affect both the sebaceous and sudoriferous glands, and probably owing to their oily nature restore that smoothness to the skin which is a sign of normal healthy action. The infusion or decoction of the seeds is employed in dropsical complaints, more especially in cases where there is co-existing derangement of the nervous system, and is considered by many to be a specific for all affections of the kidneys, for which it may with advantage be taken several times a day, before meals. -Preparations---Fluid extract, root, 1/2 to 2 drachms. Solid extract, 5 to 15 grains. Fluid extract, seed, 10 to 30 drops. Culpepper gives the following uses for the Burdock: 'The Burdock leaves are cooling and moderately drying, whereby good for old ulcers and sores.... The leaves applied to the places troubled with the shrinking in the sinews or arteries give much ease: a juice of the leaves or rather the roots themselves given to drink with old wine, doth wonderfully help the biting of any serpents- the root beaten with a little salt and laid on the place suddenly easeth the pain thereof, and helpeth those that are bit by a mad dog:... the seed being drunk in wine 40 days together doth wonderfully help the sciatica: the leaves bruised with the white of an egg and applied to any place burnt with fire, taketh out the fire, gives sudden ease and heals it up afterwards.... The root may be preserved with sugar for consumption, stone and the lax. The seed is much commended to break the stone, and is often used with other seeds and things for that purpose.' It was regarded as a valuable remedy for stone in the Middle Ages, and called Bardona. As a rule, the recipes for stone contained some seeds or 'fruits' of a 'stony' character, as gromel seed, ivy berries, and nearly always saxifrage, i.e. 'stone-breaker.' Even date-stones had to be pounded and taken; the idea being that what is naturally 'stony' would cure it; that 'like cures like' (Henslow).
  • Echinacea! Does your body good  at the end of the Ravine  Latin Names: Echinacea purpurea, Echinacea angustifolia, Echinacea pallida. Properties: Antiseptic, Stimulates Immune System, mild anti-biotic, bacteriostatic, anti-viral, anti-fungal. Uses: Improves immune system where patient suffers chronic tiredness and is susceptible to minor infections. Colds, coughs and flu and other upper respiratory conditions, enlarged lymph glands, sore throat, urinary tract infections. Boils, acne, duodenal ulcers, flu, herpes, candida and persistant infections. As a mouthwash for sore throats tonsilitis, mouth ulcers and gum infections. Externally: Wounds, skin regeneration and skin infections, psoriasis, eczema and inflammatory skin conditions.
  • Calendula while in Kinmount, ON. Latin Name: Calendula officinalis. Properties: Anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, anti-infective, anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, anti-phlogistic, anti-septic, anti-spasmodic, anti-viral, aperient, astringent, cholagogue, detoxifier, diaphoretic, emmenagogue, estrogenic, haemostatic, immunostimulant, vulnerary.Indicated for: Acne, athlete's foot, blepharitis, candida, cold sores, conjunctivitis, coughs, cramps, eczema, fungal infections, gastritis, good digestion, haemorrhoids, HIV, menopausal symptoms, menstrual cramps, minor burns, phthiriasis (dry), relieving colitis, ringworm, sore throats, skin ulcerations, snake bites, sprains, sunburns, varicose veins, viral infections, warts, wounds.
  • Red Clover while in Kinmount, ON. Latin Name: Trifoliumpratense. Uses: Hot flashes/flushes, PMS, Lowers cholesterol, helps prevent osteoporosis, reduces possibility of forming blood clots and arterial plaques, can limit development of benign prostate hyperplasia. Breast enhancement and breast health. Improve urine production, circulation of the blood and secretion of bile. They also act as detergent, sedative and tonic. Red clover has the ability to loosen phlegm and calm bronchial spasms. The fluid extract of red clover is used as an antispasmodic and alterative. Indicated for: Assisting in preventing endometrial cancer in women and limiting prostate cancer in men. Preventing Heart Disease. Quitting smoking.
  • Purslane. Latin Name:Portulacaoleracea. This wonderful green leafy vegetable is very low in calories (just 16 kcal/100g) and fats; but is rich in dietary fiber, vitamins, and minerals. Fresh leaves contain surprisingly more Omega-3 fatty acids (α-linolenic acid) than any other leafy vegetable plant. 100 grams of fresh purslane leaves provides about 350 mg of α-linolenic acid. Research studies shows that consumption of foods rich in ω-3 fatty acids may reduce the risk of coronary heart disease, stroke, and help prevent development of ADHD, autism, and other developmental differences in children. It is an excellent source of Vitamin A, (1320 IU/100 g, provides 44% of RDA) one of the highest among green leafy vegetables. Vitamin A is a known powerful natural antioxidant and is essential for vision. This vitamin is also required to maintain healthy mucus membranes and skin. Consumption of natural vegetables and fruits rich in vitamin A is known to help to protect from lung and oral cavity cancers. Purslane is also a rich source of vitamin C, and some B-complex vitamins like riboflavin, niacin, pyridoxine and carotenoids, as well as dietary minerals, such as iron, magnesium, calcium, potassium, and manganese.Also present in purslane are two types of betalain alkaloid pigments, the reddish beta-cyanins and the yellow beta-xanthins. Both of these pigment types are potent anti-oxidants and have been found to have anti-mutagenic properties in laboratory studies. [Proc. West. Pharmacol. Soc. 45: 101-103 (2002)]Tomato, Cucumber, Purslane Salad Recipe. Ingredients: 1 large cucumber, peeled, quartered lengthwise, seeds removed and discarded, then chopped; 1 medium tomato, chopped; 1 bunch purslane, thick stems removed, leaves chopped, resulting in about 1/2 cup chopped purslane; 1 minced seeded jalapeno chile pepper; 2-3 Tbsp fresh squeezed lemon juice; Salt to taste. Method: Combine all ingredients in a serving bowl. Salt to taste.
  • Common Wood Sorrel. Latin Name: Oxalis species. It has diuretic, antiscorbutic and refrigerant action, and a decoction made from its pleasant acid leaves is given in high fever, both to quench thirst and to allay the fever. The Russians make a cooling drink from an infusion of the leaves, which may be infused with water or boiled in milk. Though it may be administered freely, not only in fevers and catarrhs, but also in haemorrhages and urinary disorders, excess should be guarded against, as the oxalic salts are not suitable to all constitutions, especially those of a gouty and rheumatic tendency. The old herbalists tell us that Wood Sorrel is more effectual than the true Sorrels as a blood cleanser, and will strengthen a weak stomach, produce an appetite, check vomiting, and remove obstructions of the viscera. The juice of the leaves turns red when clarified and makes a fine, clear syrup, which was considered as effectual as the infusion. The juice used as a gargle is a remedy for ulcers in the mouth, and is good to heal wounds and to stanch bleeding. Sponges and linen cloths saturated with the juice and applied, were held to be effective in the reduction of swellings and inflammation. An excellent conserve, Conserva Ligulae, used to be made by beating the fresh leaves up with three times their weight of sugar and orange peel, and this was the basis of the cooling and acid drink that was long a favourite remedy in malignant fevers and scurvy. In Henry VIII's time this plant was held in great repute as a pot-herb, but after the introduction of French Sorrel, with its large succulent leaves, it gradually lost its position as a salad and pot-herb. From Le Dictionnaire des Ménages (Paris, 1820): -'Limonade sans Citrous, Limonade Sèche-Take three drachms of Salt of Sorrel and one pound of white sugar; reduce them to powder separately, and then mix them. Keep the powder, which is known as dry lemonade, in a well-corked bottle. Substitute tartaric acid for Salt of Sorrel, divide the powder into suitable portions, and you have "lemonade powders without lemons."' From A Plain Plantain: -'A Sirrup for a Feaver- 'Take Sirrup of Violets two ounces; Sirrup of Woodsorrell two ounces; Sirrup of Lemmon two ounces, mixed altogether, and drink it.'
  • Time for nature rachel naipaul

    1. 1. Time for Naturein the St Clair Ravine, Toronto by Rachel Naipaul Photos taken on Galaxy Nexus Phone edited using Instagram App
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