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Fighting for Eyeballs in the Content Revolution - 7 Principals of Content Marketing
Fighting for Eyeballs in the Content Revolution - 7 Principals of Content Marketing
Fighting for Eyeballs in the Content Revolution - 7 Principals of Content Marketing
Fighting for Eyeballs in the Content Revolution - 7 Principals of Content Marketing
Fighting for Eyeballs in the Content Revolution - 7 Principals of Content Marketing
Fighting for Eyeballs in the Content Revolution - 7 Principals of Content Marketing
Fighting for Eyeballs in the Content Revolution - 7 Principals of Content Marketing
Fighting for Eyeballs in the Content Revolution - 7 Principals of Content Marketing
Fighting for Eyeballs in the Content Revolution - 7 Principals of Content Marketing
Fighting for Eyeballs in the Content Revolution - 7 Principals of Content Marketing
Fighting for Eyeballs in the Content Revolution - 7 Principals of Content Marketing
Fighting for Eyeballs in the Content Revolution - 7 Principals of Content Marketing
Fighting for Eyeballs in the Content Revolution - 7 Principals of Content Marketing
Fighting for Eyeballs in the Content Revolution - 7 Principals of Content Marketing
Fighting for Eyeballs in the Content Revolution - 7 Principals of Content Marketing
Fighting for Eyeballs in the Content Revolution - 7 Principals of Content Marketing
Fighting for Eyeballs in the Content Revolution - 7 Principals of Content Marketing
Fighting for Eyeballs in the Content Revolution - 7 Principals of Content Marketing
Fighting for Eyeballs in the Content Revolution - 7 Principals of Content Marketing
Fighting for Eyeballs in the Content Revolution - 7 Principals of Content Marketing
Fighting for Eyeballs in the Content Revolution - 7 Principals of Content Marketing
Fighting for Eyeballs in the Content Revolution - 7 Principals of Content Marketing
Fighting for Eyeballs in the Content Revolution - 7 Principals of Content Marketing
Fighting for Eyeballs in the Content Revolution - 7 Principals of Content Marketing
Fighting for Eyeballs in the Content Revolution - 7 Principals of Content Marketing
Fighting for Eyeballs in the Content Revolution - 7 Principals of Content Marketing
Fighting for Eyeballs in the Content Revolution - 7 Principals of Content Marketing
Fighting for Eyeballs in the Content Revolution - 7 Principals of Content Marketing
Fighting for Eyeballs in the Content Revolution - 7 Principals of Content Marketing
Fighting for Eyeballs in the Content Revolution - 7 Principals of Content Marketing
Fighting for Eyeballs in the Content Revolution - 7 Principals of Content Marketing
Fighting for Eyeballs in the Content Revolution - 7 Principals of Content Marketing
Fighting for Eyeballs in the Content Revolution - 7 Principals of Content Marketing
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Fighting for Eyeballs in the Content Revolution - 7 Principals of Content Marketing

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This presentation was delivered to small business owners at the 2012 Ohio Growth Summit as the kick off to a four hour, panel-based content marketing track. …

This presentation was delivered to small business owners at the 2012 Ohio Growth Summit as the kick off to a four hour, panel-based content marketing track.


The talk covers the 7 foundational principles of content marketing that will help you and your business build strategic understanding of how publishing content will lead to greater audience attention, and ultimately more engaged customers for your business.

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  • Ladies and gentleman, the revolution started with one simple claim...\n
  • First known comparison between broadcast television and the internet\nContent was how microsoft was going to be microsoft’s focus\n
  • Can’t find the post on any of Microsoft’s websites\n
  • Can’t find the post on any of Microsoft’s websites\n
  • Can’t find the post on any of Microsoft’s websites\n
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  • Eric Vessles and his partners have been running a content marketing business since before the term was even popularized\nWhat They Think, has become the single largest online publication for executives and business owners in the printing industry, with revenues in the millions — not too shabby when you consider that the company is operated by just a handful of partners.\nOne of the stories that Eric shared with me years ago changed my perception of how content works on the web. He and his team pride themselves on never having missed a single publishing deadline in over 10 years of operating What They Think. Come hell or high water, their newsletters are alwayson time, and fresh content is always up on then site when they say it will be. No exceptions and no slips.\nConsistency is queen.\n\n
  • Eric Vessles and his partners have been running a content marketing business since before the term was even popularized\nWhat They Think, has become the single largest online publication for executives and business owners in the printing industry, with revenues in the millions — not too shabby when you consider that the company is operated by just a handful of partners.\nOne of the stories that Eric shared with me years ago changed my perception of how content works on the web. He and his team pride themselves on never having missed a single publishing deadline in over 10 years of operating What They Think. Come hell or high water, their newsletters are alwayson time, and fresh content is always up on then site when they say it will be. No exceptions and no slips.\nConsistency is queen.\n\n
  • Speed is everything in content marketing, and I think a lot of marketing teams get stuck on this one. For traditional marketers that want our content and work to be perfect before it hits the digital shelves is simply part of our business DNA. That’s not a bad thing,  but be willing to make the choice to let some of that go.\nThere are real benefits related to getting attention from search traffic and fresh consumer eyeballs on the content you publish, but only if your content hits the market as one of the first to arrive. On the web, waiting 48 hours to hit your publish button can mean the difference between first page placement for a certain phrase and being buried in the SERP sand.\nKeep in mind, too, that the Internet conversation is ongoing. You’re allowed to evolve your opinions and thoughts on just about anything, and your audience will appreciate that you are brave and attentive enough to do so.\n
  • Every Wednesday night, my fiance and I look forward to watching the hit series, Modern Family. It’s hysterical, and while we don’t watch a ton of TV, the program has become a welcome part of our weekly routine.\nThen, a funny thing happened. We started watching this show called Happy Endings that airs immediately after Modern Family. That one was funny too, and so our Wednesday night TV viewing time investment has essentially doubled, all while staying on the same television network.\nTelevision and radio have always bought into the idea of programming content. And, rightly so, it’s media. Much different from things like books and articles that are, for the most part, intended to be read and digested once or twice by a consumer, media programming has been designed to keep end users coming back over and over again by establishing a placeholder on that consumer’s calendar.\nWhen you’re planning your content, try to think more like a television program director and less like a single-book author.\n
  • If you ask most business owners if they would consider their company to be a publisher, the answer would be a quick “no.”\nThat makes sense. If you’re a restaurant or retail shop, publishing is not really your business. Or is it? Companies like Jeni’s Splended Icecream take this to heart. Jeni’s book, Jeni's Splendid Ice Creams at Home was a New York Time Best Seller twice in summer 2011, Washington Post top 10 cookbooks of 2011.\nWhen you’re planning your content to market your business, don’t forget to consider how your brand can potentially sell some of the content you create. Your content can always be assigned a value and that can be used to create additional offerings down the road.\n
  • Also mention gated content - Chris Brogan\nMy friend Lex McAllister reminded me of this a few months back when I joined her on her radio show, No Excuses. Lex, like other talk radio hosts, makes it a consistent practice to tease her listeners before going to commercial breaks in order to hook them into the content that’s coming up next.\nWhen you’re starting to execute on your content marketing editorial calendar, make sure that you are building the expectations and affinity of your audience by teasing them with the content you have coming up next.\n\n
  • Welcome to the age of Internet celebrities! Who’s yours?\nLet me put it this way — I had never heard about Thomas Nelson Publishers until I started digging the stuff that Michael Hyatt writes on leadership and values on his blog. I was never really a big fan of Ford until I started following Scott Monty. I hadn’t even heard much about Edelman until Steve Rubeland David Armano piqued my interest with their content. Locally, you probably wouldn’t recognize the name Geben Communication, but you’d probably smile at the mention of Heather Whaling.\nBrand has shifted, folks. Because of the social web and content marketing, human brands are now equally as (if not more) important as company brands. Companies merely exist. People, on the other hand, are very much alive.\nWhen planning your content marketing strategy, be sure to consider what human brands will help you carry your company’s brand into the online conversation and how you will help them shine.\n
  • Number seven is the deadly sin in content marketing, if you forget about it.\nI was raised by two registered nurses who liked to make extra dollars by working overtime or being on call. Having pagers go off during dinner was simply part of the norm in my parents’ house. And why not? Why not make a little extra cash by hedging your bets that it would be a slow night. (That said, it’s rarely a slow night in hospitals.)\nNow, think back to why you are doing content marketing in the first place. Yes, every business wants to boost sales and build brand awareness; but the truth of the matter is that to reach those goals you must first succeed in building an online conversation around the content objects you produce.\nWhen and if people will be talking about your content (and the humans who put it out there for discussion), make sure to be ready to participate in real time. Look at ways to staff your online presence with humans from your company, and make sure to design shifts and assign staff to man the outposts on weekends and evening hours. Don’t be afraid to put members of your team “on call” at home, but make sure that you compensate them for that time.\nIf you want to win big bonus points, reward them BIG time if they can show you that they consistently respond to your customers in less than 10 minutes.\n\n
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  • Transcript

    • 1. Content is king!
    • 2. The original ‘Content isKing’ article was written byBill Gates back in 1996.
    • 3. Content Marketing
    • 4. The King ofContent Marketing @juntajoe #OGS12
    • 5. Viva LaRevolution... Photo by vincewilcox
    • 6. @nateriggs #OGS12 Photo by looseends
    • 7. @nateriggs #OGS12FIGHTING FOR EYEBALLS IN THECONTENT REVELOUTIONThe 7 Core Principles of Content Marketing Photo by looseends
    • 8. http://slidesha.re/OGS12CM
    • 9. PRINCIPLE 1 Photo credit: TheGiantVermin
    • 10. PRINCIPLE 1If content is king, consistancy is queen. @nateriggs #OGS12 Photo credit: TheGiantVermin
    • 11. PRINCIPLE 2 Be willing to trade ‘being perfect’ for ‘being first’Photo credit: wwarby @nateriggs #OGS12
    • 12. PRINCIPLE 3Approach publishing fromthe mindset of ‘programming’@nateriggs #OGS12
    • 13. Photo by 401KPRINCIPLE 4Treat your content asanother profit center.@nateriggs #OGS12
    • 14. PRINCIPLE 5Tease your audience with what you keep behind the curtain @nateriggs #OGS12
    • 15. PRINCIPLE 6Lean on the content of brand evangelists. @nateriggs #OGS12 photo credit: cuttingitstraight.com
    • 16. PRINCIPLE 7Be prepared to play in theconversation your contentcreates.@nateriggs #OGS12
    • 17. @nateriggs nateriggs.com
    • 18. tkg.com#OGS12 Sponsor Facebook.com/thekarchergroup
    • 19. Advanced Content Marketing for Small Business #OGS12
    • 20. Expert Panel Discussions10:20 – 11:00AMHow To Discover Your Story11:05 – 12:00PMHow To Tell Your Story12:30PM – 1:15PMContent Marketing Stories from SuccessfulSmall Business Owners
    • 21. #OGS12 10:20 – 11:00AM How To Discover Your StorySarah J. Storer Eric Leslie Amy Schmitteauer@sarahjstorer @beonscene @SchmittasticThe Karcher Group OnScene Media & Savvy Sexy Social Marketing
    • 22. #OGS12 11:05 – 12:00PM How To Tell Your StoryJames Clear Dan Tolland Sam Falletta@james_clear @d_toland @samfallettaPassive Panda @OhioFarmBureau Incept
    • 23. #OGS12 12:30PM – 1:15PM Content Marketing Stories from Successful Small Business OwnersAnthony Iannarino Gini Dietrich Joe Pullizzi@iannarino @ginidietrich @juntajoeSOLUTIONS Staffing Arment Dietrich Content Marketing Institute

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