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Presentation for the Northeast Minnesota STEM Network
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Presentation for the Northeast Minnesota STEM Network

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This was a 10min presentation for around 100 participants in the first Northeast MN STEM Network gathering. As an invited panel member, I provided a brief introduction to informal STEM education (ISE) …

This was a 10min presentation for around 100 participants in the first Northeast MN STEM Network gathering. As an invited panel member, I provided a brief introduction to informal STEM education (ISE) in the region, some of the potential benefits for the education network, and some of the potential benefits for ISE of networking with other regional STEM providers.

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  • From NRC Learning Science in Informal Environments: People, Places, and Pursuits (2009) “Contrary to the pervasive idea that schools are responsible for addressing the scientific knowledge needs of society, the reality is that schools cannot act alone, and society must better understand and draw on the full range of science learning experiences to improve science education broadly. Schools serve a school-age population, whereas people of all ages need to understand science as they grapple with science-related issues in their everyday lives. It is also true that individuals spend as little as 9 percent of their lives in schools (Jackson, 1968; Sosniak, 2001). ”
  • Illustration of CAISE The Informal Science Education Landscape: A Preliminary Investigation Executive Summary
  • Transcript

    • 1. Perspective: Informal Science Education NORTHEAST MINNESOTA STEM NETWORK NOVEMBER 8, 2012 NATHAN J MEYER PROGRAM LEADER, EXTENSION CENTER FOR FOOD, AGRICULTURAL AND NATURAL RESOURCE SCIENCES 1 © 2012 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved.
    • 2. PRESENTATION GEOGRAPHY 1. Who am I? 2. What is Informal Science Education? 3. What is the (potential) value of our network? 2© 2012 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved.
    • 3. IT’S (NOT) ALL ABOUT ME 3© 2012 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved.
    • 4. 4© 2012 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved.
    • 5. “Tens of millions of Americans, young and old, choose tolearn about science in informal ways - by visiting museumsand aquariums, attending after-school programs, pursuingpersonal hobbies, and watching TV documentaries, forexample. There is abundant evidence that these programsand settings, and even everyday experiences such as awalk in the park, contribute to peoples knowledge andinterest in science.” - Learning Science in Informal Environments: People, Places, and Pursuits (2009) National Research Council 5© 2012 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved.
    • 6.  Learner motivated  Relevant  Collaborative  Non linear  Open-ended 6© 2012 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved.
    • 7. 7© 2012 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved.
    • 8. INSULATE the ENERGY FLOW 8© 2012 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved.
    • 9. 53% Home and Community 9© 2012 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved.
    • 10. “I remember that was the first time I ever figured out the difference between deciduous and evergreen trees and everyone else knew it and I didn’t. So I pretended I did and it made me feel good.” -11th Grade Student 10© 2012 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved.
    • 11. SPARK the CURRENT 11© 2012 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved.
    • 12. 12© 2012 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved.
    • 13. BIND our CIRCUITRY 13© 2012 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved.
    • 14. 14© 2012 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved.
    • 15. STEM 15© 2012 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved.
    • 16. WHAT is our STORY? 16© 2012 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved.
    • 17. HOW can we grow STABILITY? 17© 2012 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved.
    • 18.  Embrace the OPPORTUNITY  Proceed as a TEAM  Focus on IMPACT  Focus on VALUE 18© 2012 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved.
    • 19. THANK YOU© 2012 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved.The University of Minnesota is an equal opportunity educator and employer. In accordance with the Americans with DisabilitiesAct, this PowerPoint is available in alternative formats upon request. Direct requests to the Extension Store at 800-876-8636. 19

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