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Behaviorism

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Transcript

  • 1. Behaviorism By Nate Underwod
  • 2. Table of Contents• What is behaviorism?• A little more about those who founded behaviorism!• Classroom Application and Importance!• Classroom Use and My Teaching Goals! All Finished??
  • 3. Behaviorism…• The idea that anything a learner (student) does; including acting, thinking, or feeling, is considered a behavior• Primarily concerned with observable and measurable aspects of human behavior• Use of rewards and punishments are common Next Page ->
  • 4. Behaviorism (cont.)• Founded by John Watson and B.F. Skinner• There are 2 different types of conditioning: classical and operant• Classical conditioning: when they train the mind to bring response from a stimulus that previously brought a different response• Operant conditioning: use of the punishment and reward system to achieve desired behaviors Back to Home->
  • 5. John B. Watson• John Watson is considered to be the Father of Behaviorism• Lived from 1878 until 1958• He believed that behaviors were created by stimuli with specific responses• B. F. Skinner is recognized as another founder Next Page ->
  • 6. More Key Figures• Ivan Pavlov(1849-1936) – Studied reflexes and conditioning as a form of learning – Studied the effects of an environment on a learner – His work was often cited in Watson’s research• Clark Hull (1884-1952) – Furthermore researched behaviorism while drawing off of Pavlov and Watson’s findings Back to Home->
  • 7. Practical Classroom Application• Contracts: agreement between students and teachers of what behavior is acceptable• Consequences: occur immediately after a behavior (positive of negative)• Positive Reinforcement: example… smiling for a correct answer.• Negative Reinforcement: giving a homework pass to students with perfect attendance• Extinction: working to remove a behavior from the classroom (ex. talking during class) Next Page ->
  • 8. Why its important in the Classroom!• It is rewarding for both the students and the instructors• The students work to achieve positive results which leave them better off, and with higher grades• When I was a student, I found the reward and punishment system to be the most productive Back to Home->
  • 9. My Use of Behaviorism• I feel that behaviorism will be very important in my classroom, because if I do not positively reinforce a desired behavior, then it may end of extinct.• I plan to use the contract method because it will set the ground rules and goals for the year early on.• Punishment will also be key, because that is what it took for me to really learn from my mistakes when I was in 4th grade myself Next Page ->
  • 10. Teaching Goals• By using the methods, I don’t only aim to achieve excellence in the classroom, but also out of the classroom.• That extra effort to effect the students outside of the classroom as well, is where you can really leave a lasting impression on a young students life. Back to Home->
  • 11. Hope you enjoyed learning a little bit about Behaviorism and my application of it in the classroom…Don’t forget to check out my review word search for a fun treat! • http://en.educaplay.com/en/learningresources/ 606569/behaviorism.htm