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Principles<br />Elements<br />And<br />Art<br />Of<br />By Natalie Burr<br />VAEDU 326<br />
BALANCE<br />A feeling of visual weight<br />No one portion of an artwork seems too heavy or overpowers any other part of ...
Informal balance: typically asymmetrical, creates interest and variety</li></ul>The Girl with the Red Hat Jan Vermeer <br ...
Unity<br />A harmonious blend of all elements<br /><ul><li>All the separate elements of an artwork look as if they belong ...
We are led around and through the composition by any one of several devices—colors, lines, or shapes—that connect various ...
The Creation of Adam; Michelangelo Buonarroti; Fresco, 1511<br />Artists use combinations of the different art elements to...
<ul><li>Proportion has to do with relationships— with the relationship of one part to the whole or of one part to another ...
Various art elements such as texture or color can be used in pleasing proportions or amounts to create a good composition....
Repetition Rhythm Pattern<br />Repetition in the world of nature and art forms rhythm and pattern<br />Just as the repeate...
Emphasis<br />What catches your eye when you first look at an artwork?<br /><ul><li>Emphasis is the principle of art that ...
Artists usually try to avoid  creating too many focal points in an artwork, since this tends to be confusing.</li></ul>The...
Variety<br />The “spice of life” in artwork<br /><ul><li>Variety is the art principle concerned with differences.
Using differences and contrasting elements enlivens artwork.
Too much sameness, however, can be boring and lose attention.</li></ul>Tower of Babel; Pieter Bruegel the Elder; Oil on pa...
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  1. 1. Principles<br />Elements<br />And<br />Art<br />Of<br />By Natalie Burr<br />VAEDU 326<br />
  2. 2. BALANCE<br />A feeling of visual weight<br />No one portion of an artwork seems too heavy or overpowers any other part of the artwork<br /><ul><li>Formal balance: dignified, stable, more static, symmetrical
  3. 3. Informal balance: typically asymmetrical, creates interest and variety</li></ul>The Girl with the Red Hat Jan Vermeer <br />Oil on panel, 1665<br />
  4. 4. Unity<br />A harmonious blend of all elements<br /><ul><li>All the separate elements of an artwork look as if they belong together.
  5. 5. We are led around and through the composition by any one of several devices—colors, lines, or shapes—that connect various elements. </li></ul> The Starry Night<br />Vincent Van Gogh<br />Oil on canvas, 1889<br />
  6. 6. The Creation of Adam; Michelangelo Buonarroti; Fresco, 1511<br />Artists use combinations of the different art elements to cause the viewer’s eyes to move or sweep over a composition in a particular manner. Our eyes are directed to a focal point, or they sweept along an important visual channel that includes all areas of the picture plane and leaves no dead or void spots. To do this, the artist exploits the direction of a line or utilizes the compelling force of a path made by repeated shapes or colors.<br />Movement<br />Gives life to an artwork<br />
  7. 7. <ul><li>Proportion has to do with relationships— with the relationship of one part to the whole or of one part to another part.
  8. 8. Various art elements such as texture or color can be used in pleasing proportions or amounts to create a good composition.</li></ul>Proportion<br /><ul><li>Artists do not always choose to use such realistic proportions. When they exaggerate, distort, or deviate from what we consider normal proportions, the effect can be powerfully expressive or quite decorative.</li></ul>The Sailor<br />Pablo Picasso, 1938<br />relationships<br />
  9. 9. Repetition Rhythm Pattern<br />Repetition in the world of nature and art forms rhythm and pattern<br />Just as the repeated beat of a drum is rhythm, so the repetition of line, shape, and color creates a visual rhythm. Rhythm can create an exciting visual beat for our eyes to follow.<br />Golconde; Rene Magritte; 1953, oil on canvas<br />
  10. 10. Emphasis<br />What catches your eye when you first look at an artwork?<br /><ul><li>Emphasis is the principle of art that directs and centers our attention on one significant part of an artwork
  11. 11. Artists usually try to avoid creating too many focal points in an artwork, since this tends to be confusing.</li></ul>The Swing; Jean-Honore Fragonard; Oil on canvas, 1767 <br />
  12. 12. Variety<br />The “spice of life” in artwork<br /><ul><li>Variety is the art principle concerned with differences.
  13. 13. Using differences and contrasting elements enlivens artwork.
  14. 14. Too much sameness, however, can be boring and lose attention.</li></ul>Tower of Babel; Pieter Bruegel the Elder; Oil on panel, 1563<br />
  15. 15. Elasticity; Umberto Boccioni; Oil on canvas, 1912<br />Color appeals to our sense of beauty, whether we recognize and respond to it in natural objects or in works of human origin.<br /><ul><li>Primary colors: red, yellow, blue
  16. 16. Secondary colors: orange, green, violet
  17. 17. Warm colors: red, orange, yellow (these colors advance visually
  18. 18. Cool colors: blue, green, violet (these colors tend to recede.</li></ul>Color<br />the response of vision to wave lengths of light<br />
  19. 19. Line<br />Line is the path of a point moving through space<br />Line is a record of action or movement<br />Different types of line engender different feelings:<br />Vertical: authority, stability, strength<br />Horizontal: calmness, peace, continuity<br />Diagonal: interest, instability, unease, curiosity<br />Curvilinear: softness, ease, relaxation<br />Jagged: anger, hurry, tension, excitement, fear<br />Line can be categorized in five different ways:<br /><ul><li>Width
  20. 20. Length
  21. 21. Degree of curvature
  22. 22. Direction/position
  23. 23. Texture</li></ul>I and the Village; Marc Chagall; Oil on canvas 1911 <br />
  24. 24. Shape<br />A shape may be called a visually perceived area of value, color, texture or line– or any combination of these elements.<br />Yellow, Red, Blue; Wassily Kandinsky; Oil on canvas, 1925 <br />When a line moves through space until it meets itself and forms an enclosure, it becomes a shape, form or mass<br />There are two types of shapes:<br />Biomorphic: related to nature, curved, rounded, soft edged, often asymmetrical<br />Geometric: precise, hard edged, squared, has straight lines, angles, usually symmetrical, generally man or machine made<br />
  25. 25. Space<br />The distance of area between, around, above, below or within shapes. <br />Three dimensional space has height, width, and depth, it is actual space. Such works can be viewed from many angles and will appear different from each view.<br />Two dimensional space is used for art works created on flat surfaces, such as drawings, paintings and prints. These forms have only height and width, with no actual depth. The implied depth or space portrayed in the work is the pictorial space or picture plane.<br />Galatea Of The Spheres; Salvador Dali; Oil on canvas, 1952<br />
  26. 26. The kiss; Gustav Klimt; oil and gold leaf on canvas, 1907<br />Implied/<br />Simulated texture: <br />has the same feel as the surface but looks different (surface may be smooth but look like wood, bark, stone<br />Actual texture:<br />what is actually felt—rough, smooth, matt, uneven, etc.<br />Impasto: <br />refers to this thick application of paint to a ground. Looks and feels heavy, rough to the touch, can be up to 1 inch think<br />Trompe Le Oel:<br /> refers to the style of painting that emphasizes photographic realism of detail, while maintaining a relatively smooth, glassy surface<br />Texture<br />Texture is the element that is concerned with how things feel or look as if they might feel on the surface.<br />
  27. 27. Light or high values are closer to white, and low or dark values are closer to black.<br />The manipulation and arrangement of light and dark within an artwork is sometimes called “chiaroscuro”—chiaro means light and oscuro means dark.<br />Venice Twilight; Claude Monet; Oil on canvas, 1908<br />Value<br />Contrast between light and dark<br />
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