 GROUP 2
 ANTHONY
 NATASHA S
 LIZ
 JAMES
 JUSTIN
 MOIRI
 JUSTIN-RELIGION
 JAMES-HOLIDAYS
 MOIRI-FOOD
 ANTHONY-MYTHS & LEGENDS
 LIZ-LANGUAGE
 NATASHA S.-HISTORY, MUSIC, & FL...
 Our group decided to pick Ireland because a
couple of the members have Irish roots. We
will discuss history, music, flag...
 Traditional Irish music reaches back to the ancient past. They
includes drinking songs, ballads, and laments. Traditiona...
 1950s a great concern was voiced over that the music of
Ireland was being lost in the influx of foreign music.
This issu...
 Renewed interest in traditional Irish music lead to a new for Irish rock. Some of the early acts
were horselips, Van Mor...
 SIXTH CENTURY BC-Ireland was invaded by the Celts (Gaeles) who came from the European
mainland. Celtic civilization surv...
 Mass emigrations took place during the period 1847 to 1854. The mid 1800’s
brought Irish leader Daniel O’Connell to cent...
 In 1916 the Easter Rising triggered civil wars between protestant and Catholic militant
groups in Northern Ireland(P 12)...
 Ireland is divided between Northern Ireland, part of the United Kingdom which has a protestant majority and
the Republic...
 1. What do the colors represent in both of Irelands Flags
 2. What is the most significant historic event for Ireland?
...
1. Spencer Shannon 2000 Countries of the World Ireland U S:Gareth Stevens
Publishing
2. Brady Ciaran 2000 The Encyclopedia...
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Ireland

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Ireland

  1. 1.  GROUP 2  ANTHONY  NATASHA S  LIZ  JAMES  JUSTIN  MOIRI
  2. 2.  JUSTIN-RELIGION  JAMES-HOLIDAYS  MOIRI-FOOD  ANTHONY-MYTHS & LEGENDS  LIZ-LANGUAGE  NATASHA S.-HISTORY, MUSIC, & FLAGS  Concept Holidays-nonverbal communication  FOOD-STEROTYPING  All other topics Intercultural Communication
  3. 3.  Our group decided to pick Ireland because a couple of the members have Irish roots. We will discuss history, music, flags, language, myths, legends, food, holidays, and religion. We are also going to see how Intercultural communication relates to these topics. We are also going to relate non verbal communication with holidays. Relate stereotyping to food.
  4. 4.  Traditional Irish music reaches back to the ancient past. They includes drinking songs, ballads, and laments. Traditional dance music included reels 4/4 hornpipes, and jigs. The polka arrived in the 19th century ( P 3). The music is attributed to a history of persecution. During Britain's rule Irish music was outlawed for a time. Irish music was considered a national pride by the Irish. It was forced to go underground. One of the best place to listen to traditional Irish music is in the pubs( P60).  The instruments used are uilleann pipes, bodhran, fiddle, flute, accordion, and concertina. Uilleann pipes is similar to the bagpipes it is a complex bellows-blown bagpipe with up to seven different pipes descended from Irish war-pipe. Bodhran Irish frame drum usually struck by stick but sometimes hand. Constructed from a round wooden frame contains wood cross, and head made from goat skin. The accordion and concertina were first associated with female performers(P 246).
  5. 5.  1950s a great concern was voiced over that the music of Ireland was being lost in the influx of foreign music. This issue was confronted in 50-60s by groups trying to bring back traditional Irish music. One of these groups was called Comhaltas Ceoltoiri Eireann (CCE) or the Irish Music Movement. They organized festivals and music classes in the late 50s. By 1960 there was a great increase in music groups one was the chieftains. They are still popular today. Some group went abroad came back during the revival to be part of the movement.  Renewed interest in traditional Irish music lead to a new for Irish rock. Some of the early acts were horselips, Van Morrison, and the Pogues. Later Irish rock spread through out the world with successful act like Sinead O’Conner and U2. There music is not de
  6. 6.  Renewed interest in traditional Irish music lead to a new for Irish rock. Some of the early acts were horselips, Van Morrison, and the Pogues. Later Irish rock spread through out the world with successful act like Sinead O’Conner and U2. There music is not directly derived from Irish traditional music but U2 includes political and social commentary an example is the song Sunday Bloody Sunday. See in music they took rock which is from another country and added it to there own culture.  Irish acts Sold Genre Years active 1. U2 170 Million + Rock 1976–Present (33 Years) 2. Enya 80 Million + Celtic/ New Age 1986–Present (22 Years) 3. Van Morrison 55 Million + Soul 1967–Present (40 Years) 4. The Cranberries 50 Million + Rock 1990–2003, 2009–Present (13 Years) 5. The Corrs 43 Million + Pop 1998 - present (12 Years)(P6)
  7. 7.  SIXTH CENTURY BC-Ireland was invaded by the Celts (Gaeles) who came from the European mainland. Celtic civilization survived for centuries in Ireland despite Christianization and trade with mainland Europe. They maintained a different character from the rest of Britain as the Roman’s never conquered them. Over the following centuries, Ireland was invaded by Vikings, Norsemen, Normans (who came from Europe), and the English and were bedeviled with civil wars which did more harm.  In the 12th century, King Henry II of England laid claim to Ireland. The English control was limited by distance except for the city of Dublin which was known as “the Pale”(P 10). Gaelic society consisted of a loose association of tribes that shared laws, customs, and language under the symbolic leadership of a High King, who ruled from a place called the Hill of Tara. The complicated clash of Gaelic traditions and English laws enforced by King Henry VIII of England brought about the downfall of the tribal system that had existed for hundreds of years. Irish clan leader Thomas Fitzgerald renounced his allegiance to King Henry VIII in 1534 and was hanged in 1537. Many Irish Catholics were outraged when Henry VIII created the Church of England and made it England’s official religion over Catholicism.. King Henry’s assumption of King of Ireland also angered them. This time in Irish history religion, rather than national origin, determined the political scene.. They did occasionally stage rebellions to unfair English practices, which largely removed all social rights from Catholics including the right to own or lease land(P 11). Daniel O'Connell was known as the Liberator for his leadership in the fight for Catholic emancipation from English rule. During the mid-1800’s a blight wiped out the Ireland’s potato crop, which was the staple food for the Irish peasants. As
  8. 8.  Mass emigrations took place during the period 1847 to 1854. The mid 1800’s brought Irish leader Daniel O’Connell to center stage in Irish politics and with him came a new political sense of Ireland as a nation.  Fitzgerald renounced his allegiance to King Henry VIII in 1534 and was hanged in 1537. Many Irish Catholics were outraged when Henry VIII created the Church of England and made it England’s official religion over Catholicism.. King Henry’s assumption of King of Ireland also angered them. This time in Irish history religion, rather than national origin, determined the political scene.. They did occasionally stage rebellions to unfair English practices, which largely removed all social rights from Catholics including the right to own or lease land(P 11). Daniel O'Connell was known as the Liberator for his leadership in the fight for Catholic emancipation from English rule. During the mid-1800’s a blight wiped out the Ireland’s potato crop, which was the staple food for the Irish peasants. As a result over one million people died of disease and starvation. Mass emigrations took place during the period 1847 to 1854. The mid 1800’s brought Irish leader Daniel O’Connell to center stage in Irish politics and with him came a new political sense of Ireland as a nation.
  9. 9.  In 1916 the Easter Rising triggered civil wars between protestant and Catholic militant groups in Northern Ireland(P 12). In 1920, a new hoe rule bill was enacted establish separate parliaments for Northern Ireland and Southern Ireland. Eamon de DeValera was made the Irish prime minister in 1932 and a new constitution established the sovereign nation of Ireland, or Eire, within the British Commonwealth of Nations(P13). Clashes between Irish Catholics and Protestants in Northern Ireland have resulted in many deaths and the destruction of property. In 1998 the Good Friday Peace Agreement was signed between Irish Catholic and Protestant militant groups. Fighting broke out in the 1960’s between the two groups and the IRA a guerilla warfare group contributed to the chaos.  In the 21st century during 2004 the Irish people voted to stop granting citizenship to anyone born in the country(P 14). 2005 Cork is made European Capital of Culture. The EU(European Union) recognizes Irish as a working language. See a lot of there history was influenced by other cultures. 
  10. 10.  Ireland is divided between Northern Ireland, part of the United Kingdom which has a protestant majority and the Republic of Ireland a Catholic stronghold and Southern Ireland and each has its own flag.  The flag of Northern Ireland is based on the flag of England, with the red cross of Saint George, the patron saint of England in the background. The red hand is derived from the legend of a war party leader who promised a prize to the first man to touch land with his right hand. Hearing this a left handed man cut off his right hand and flung it to the shore, winning the challenge. The six points of the star refer to the six counties of Ulster that make up Northern Ireland. This flag has been used as a banner of arms by the government of Northern Ireland since 1925, but it was not officially adopted until 1953.  The flag of the Republic or Ireland, Southern Ireland, has three vertical panels of green, white, and orange. The green band represents Catholics of native Irish descent, thee orange band, descendants of the seventeenth century British Protestants (a group of people who supported England’s King William of Orange”, and the white band, hope for peace between these two groups. The Irish tricolor, as the flag is called, was not adopted as the national flag until after the Easter Rising of 1916, when 2,500 Irish rebelled against British rule in Dublin(P 5). See the flag represents religion which you can find all over the world.
  11. 11.  1. What do the colors represent in both of Irelands Flags  2. What is the most significant historic event for Ireland?  3. What are the 5 top selling acts of all time in Ireland?  4. What are the instruments use in Ireland traditional music.
  12. 12. 1. Spencer Shannon 2000 Countries of the World Ireland U S:Gareth Stevens Publishing 2. Brady Ciaran 2000 The Encyclopedia of Ireland US &Canada: Oxford University Press 3. (Wikipedia 2010) Information website specifically on the music Retrieved October 28th 2010 from website:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/music of Ireland 4. (Wikipedia 2010) Information website specifically on the history of Ireland Retrieved October 28th 2010 from website :http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/history of Ireland 5.( Irish History Timeline 2010) Information website specifically on the timeline history of Ireland Retrieved October 28th 2010 from website:htpp//www.localhistories.org/irishtime.html 6. (Bing Images2010) Bing website of Ireland Pictures November 4th 2010

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