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7th sem

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    7th sem 7th sem Document Transcript

    • Course Title: Introduction to System Administration Course no: CSC-401 Full Marks: 70+10+20 Credit hours: 3 Pass Marks: 28+4+8 Nature of course: Theory (3 Hrs.) + Lab (3 Hrs.) Course Synopsis: Intended for students already comfortable with working in the Unix environment, this in-depth course helps students acquire the variety of skills needed to set up and maintain Unix computers. Goals: The class concentrates on the popular Red Hat distribution of the Linux operating system, and covers subjects ranging from initial installation of Linux to day-to-day administrative tasks such as management of user accounts and disk space, and even imparting the trouble-shooting skills future system administrators will need to cope with unexpected behavior. Course Contents: Unit 1. 8 Hrs. Linux workstation installation, Linux server installation, Post-install system configuration, Scripting installation of custom setups using kickstart, Linux boot process, SysV init concepts and configuration, Managing startup of system daemons, Controlling startup of services in xinetd / inetd Unit 2. 8 Hrs. Creation, modification, and deletion of users and groups, Password aging under Linux, The Linux login process and login authentication, Regulating access to the root account via su and sudo, Creation, modification, and deletion of partitions and filesystems, Management of RAID devices under Linux, Disk space regulation using quotas, Backing up and restoring Linux filesystems, Unit 3. 9 Hrs. Scheduling jobs using cron, anacron, and at, Management of processes running on the system, Usage of process accounting and implementation of process limits, Configuration and analysis of system logs, System performance analysis, Configuring network interfaces, Setup of DNS and DHCP clients, Diagnosing network setup issues, Configuring NFS clients Unit 4. 8 Hrs. Configuration of X server, Installation and maintenance of fonts, Usage and configuration of XDMCP, Implementations of X security, Securing freshly installed Linux systems, Keeping Linux systems up-to-date, Configuration of Linux firewalls, Usage of TCP wrappers to secure Linux systems
    • Unit 5. 12 Hrs. Configuration of optimized Linux kernels, Compiling and installing custom Linux kernels, Using third-party patches with Linux kernels, Updating userland to support new kernels, Concepts for troubleshooting Linux, Analysis of system logs to identify problems, Use of systems-level debugging aids in troubleshooting, Usage of the Linux rescue environment Basic installation and configuration of common network services: telnet and SSH servers file sharing via NFS, SMB, HTTP, FTP, and TFTP e-mail services via SMTP, POP, and IMAP ISC DHCP services Laboratory works: Project on each unit Text and Reference Book: System Administrator (Linux, Fedora Core) Homework Assignment: Assignment should be given from the above units in throughout the semester. Computer Usage: No Specific. Prerequisite: Knowledge about Linux system Individuals wishing to take this class should already have a solid grounding in UNIX concepts. Fundamentals such as an understanding of the Linux file system, process management, and the ability to manipulate and edit files is considered a must and will not be covered in class. An understanding of network concepts and the TCP/IP protocol suite is helpful. Category Content: Science Aspect: 50% Design Aspect: 50%
    • Course Title: Network Security Course no: CSC-402 Full Marks: 70+10+20 Credit hours: 3 Pass Marks: 28+4+8 Nature of course: Theory (3 Hrs.) + Lab (3 Hrs.) Course Synopsis: Introduction to Net work security, Cryptography, Network Security Applications, System Security Coal: This course covers the fundamentals of networks security and the important standards and applications. Course Contents: Unit 1. Introduction to Network security Unit 2. Cryptography. 1.1 Conventional Encryption and Message confidentiality. 1.2 Public – Key Cryptography and Message Authentication. Unit 3. Network Security Applications 1.3 Authentication Applications. 1.4 Electronic Mail Security. 1.5 IP Security. 1.6 Web Security. 1.7 Network Management Security Unit 4. System Security 1.8 Intruders. 1.9 Malicious Software. 1.10Firewalls. Laboratory works: This is a group project. Each group should consist of 3 to 4 students. Phase I The first phase of the class project is to decide on a network security topic for literature survey. Choose a topic that your are interested to pursue. Check the textbook for the topics we are going to cover in detail in the course. In this phase your are required to submit the names of project’s members and one to tow pages summary of the chosen topic. There will be a power point presentation. Phase II The objective of this phase is to carry a through literature survey of the chosen topic. This means that you are required to read recently published articles in highly reputable journals
    • publications. Your are expected to collect eight to ten papers. It is expected that each student be reading 2 or 3 papers. Generally you are encouraged to choose one or tow papers of literature nature and one or more paper(s) covering different techniques of the literature part. The outcome of this phase is a professional report that covers the chosen topic. The format of the report is as follows: 1. Abstract: a concise paragraph about the material present in the report. 2. Introduction: presentation of the topic under investigation and an overview of the algorithms, techniques, and architectures used. 3. A section for each of the algorithms, techniques and architectures presented. 4. Comparison of different techniques in terms of performance and requirements (S/ W or H/W) 5. Your chosen algorithm/ technique / protocol/ architecture for implementation in phase III and method of implementation (S/W, H/W or simulation) or performance analysis 6. Conclusions 7. References 8. Appendices if required You are asked to submit a hardcopy and a soft copy of the report in the due date as well as gibing a presentation (See presentation format and report preparation) Phase III In phase III your have chosen one of the presented method/ algorithms/ techniques/ protocols / architectures for implementation. Implementation means either software or hardware or simulations. Also your can do a performance study. For software implementation, your can choose any programming language. You should be able to have a nice interface so that your implementation can be sued as an educational tools. For hardware implementation, your may have an implementation ay any level from architectural level to VLSI level. For performance studies, your can sue one of the performance evaluation techniques such as simulation, queuing models or even analytical methods. In addition to the implementation your are required to prepare a final report in the following format: 1. Abstract: a concise paragraph about the material presented in the report 2. Introduction: presentation of the topic under investigation and an overview of the algorithms, techniques and architectures used. 3. the chosen technique 4. details of implementation or performance study 5. analysis of your implementation 6. conclusions 7. references 8. appendices if required Presentations
    • • You will do a presentation for phases I, II and III of the project. Phase I and II presentations are Power Point presentations and phase III is a power point presentation and a demo. • Phase II presentation is about 30 minutes. The presentation should over all aspects of the chosen topic. Each student is required to participate in the presentation according to the materials s/he has studied. Expert tough questions in this part! • Phase III is about 15 minutes. It should start be presenting the algorithms/ technique protocol / architecture under investigation. After this it should cover the implementation details. • Slides can include graphics or text. Text slides should have a few bulleted highlights, and not have copies of paragraphs form your paper. • Report preparation • Although your report of phase II is a literature survey. It doesn’t mean that your copy paragraphs form the papers your are readings. Copying paragraphs or sentences form others work without appropriate referencing and quotation is an act of academic dishonesty that qualifies you for F grade and to be reported for disciplinary action. • Your are expected to read the papers and understand the content then express the materials using your own worked. I am not interested I in a Shakespearean writing style that you copy form references. I am interested in having your fully understand the material and present your own understanding. Finally • All presentation materials need to be submitted in your presentation slot. You should submit all source code, design work, and the written report. • Absolutely no late submissions or demos • All project membe5 shave to attend the presentation and should be prepared to answer any questions • The final grade of the project will depend on all aspects of the project such as: literature survey, application programs Text books: Network Security Essentials: Applications and Standards 2/#, William Stallings, Pearson Education References: Cryptography and Network Security, 3rd. Edition, William Stallings, Pearson Education. Network Security, Private Communication in a public world, 2/E, Charlie Caufman, Radia Perlman, Mike Specimen, Pearson Education. Homework assignments: home work assignments covering lecture materials will be given throughout the semester. Computer usages: UNIX or Linux based PC or workstation. Prerequisites: Data communication and networking Category content: Science aspect: 70% Design aspect: 30%
    • Course Title: Linux Networking Course no: CSC-403 Full Marks: 70+10+20 Credit hours: 3 Pass Marks: 28+4+8 Nature of course: Theory (3 Hrs.) + Lab (3 Hrs.) Course Synopsis: This course offers an intensive covering on TCP/IP and the Linux Networking Facilities. The course has a high practical content with an emphasis on getting a basic, working system going at each stage. Goal: To familiarize the students with the theory and practice of designing and developing a secure and meaningful network of computers using Linux as the network operating system. Course Contents: Unit 1. Introduction to Networking 3 Hrs. History, TCP/IP Networks, Linux Networking Basics Unit 2. Network Configuration 9 Hrs. 2.1 Kernel Network Configuration: Starting kernel configuration, Network protocol support, network hardware options, compiling and installing a kernel. 2.2 TCP/IP network configuration: Loading network drivers, using a DHCP client, configuring a static IP address, Using a PPP Link. 2.3 Alternative Network Stacks: Network stacks, AppleTalk, IPX/SPX, NetBUI. 2.4 Network Features: inetd server, tcpd access control, xinetd, services and protocols files, Local startup scripts, GUI tools. Unit 3. Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) 3 Hrs. DHCP Principles, setting up a simple server, DHCP relaying, DHCP configuration files, dynamic and fixed addresses, integrating with other protocols. Unit 4. Name Service and Configuration 4 Hrs. Introduction to DNS, DNS principles and operation, simple caching name server, primary and slave name servers, core DNS configuration, starting and testing a name server. Unit 5. File and Printer Sharing in Linux 6 Hrs. File and Print Sharing via Samba, Running a Samba Server, General Samba Configuration, Serving files with Samba, Serving printers with Samba, File sharing via NFS, serving files with NFS, Printer Sharing via LPD, Configuring LPD server, configuring and LPRng server, Configuring a CUPS server
    • Unit 6. File Transfer Protocol (FTP) 2 Hrs. FTP server configuration, setting up an anonymous FTP server. Unit 7. Mail Management 6 Hrs. SMTP, Mail domain administration, SMTP transport, Basic Sendmail configuration, Basic Exim configuration, Basic Postfix configuration, Procmail filter, POP and IMAP principles, configuring POP server, configuring IMAP server, Using Fetchmail. [6 hrs.] Unit 8. Remote Maintenance and Remote Login Servers 6 Hrs. Remote maintenance tools, challenge of cross distribution configuration tools, running linux conf remotely, running webmin, running SWAT, Security and Remote administration, Remote login server, rlogind, Telnet, SSH Unit 9. Network Security and Router Functions 6 Hrs. Network security issues, intrusion detection and monitoring, advanced router configuration, advanced kernel options, routing protocols, iptables, kernel configuration for iptables, iptable configuration, configuring firewall with iptables, configuring NAT with iptables, VPN in Linux, PPTP configuration, configuring a Linux FreeS/WAN server, security risks with VPN Laboratory works: Installing, configuring and testing the server systems covered in the theory. Text Books: Advanced Linux Networking, Roderick W. Smith, Addison-Wesley Professional (Pearson Education), 2002. Linux Network Administrator's Guide, Tony Bautts, Terry Dawson, Gregor N. Purdy, O'Reilly, Third Edition, 2005 Prerequisite: Computer Networking Course
    • Course Title: Managing Microsoft Server Environment Course no: CSC-404 Full Marks: 70+10+20 Credit hours: 3 Pass Marks: 28+4+8 Nature of course: Theory (3 Hrs.) + Lab (3 Hrs.) Course Synopsis: It provides students with the knowledge and skills to manage accounts and resources in a Microsoft Windows Server™ 2003 environment. Goal: This course is to provide Information Technology (IT) professionals with the knowledge and skills to deploy and managing Microsoft Server environment. Course Contents: Unit 1. Introduction to Administering Accounts and Resources 7 Hrs. Multimedia: Introduction to Administering Accounts and Resources, The Windows Server 2003 Family, Logging on to Windows Server 2003, Installing and Configuring, Administrative Tools, Creating User Accounts, Creating Computer Accounts Creating an Organizational Unit, Creating an Organizational Unit Hierarchy, Creating Computer Accounts Creating User Accounts Unit 2. Managing User and Computer Accounts 7 Hrs. Modifying Users and Computer Account Properties, Enabling and Unlocking User and Computer Accounts, Creating a User Account Template, Locating User and Computer, Accounts in Active Directory, Saving Queries, Resetting User and Computer Accounts, Moving Domain Objects, Searching for and Moving User Accounts, Searching for and Moving Computer Accounts Searching for and Enabling User Accounts Unit 3. Managing Groups 4 Hrs. Creating Groups, Managing Group Membership, Strategies for Using Groups, Modifying Groups, Using Default Groups Best Practices for Managing Groups Unit 4. Managing Access to Resources 5 Hrs. Managing Access to Shared Folders, Managing Access to Files and Folders Using NTFS Permissions, Determining Effective Permissions, Managing Access to Shared Files Using Offline Caching, Configuring Access for Manufacturing Personnel, Configuring Access for Marketing Personnel Configuring Access for Purchasing Personnel Unit 5. Implementing Printing 3 Hrs. Multimedia: Introduction to Printing in the Windows Server 2003 Family, Installing and Sharing Printers, Managing Access to Printers Using Shared Printer, Permissions, Managing Printer Drivers Implementing Printer Locations, Install Printers Browse Network Printers with Locations
    • Unit 6. Managing Printing 2 Hrs. Changing the Location of the Print Spooler, Setting Printer Priorities, Scheduling Printer Availability Configuring a Printing Pool, Creating Printing Pools Setting Printer Priorities and Availability Unit 7. Managing Access to Objects in Organizational Units 4 Hrs. Multimedia: The Role of the Organizational Unit, Modifying Permissions for Active Directory Objects Delegating Control of Organizational Units, Delegating Administrative Control, Documenting Security of an Object Created in an Organizational Unit Unit 8. Implementing Group Policy 4 Hrs. Implementing Group Policy Objects, Implementing Group Policy Objects on a Domain Managing the Deployment of Group Policy, Creating and Linking GPOs, Configuring Group Filtering on GPOs, Configuring the Enforcement of GPOs, Configuring the Blocking of GPOs Unit 9. Managing the User Environment by Using Group Policy 4 Hrs. Configuring Group Policy Settings, Assigning Scripts with Group Policy, Configuring Folder Redirection, Determining Applied GPOs, Creating a Group Policy, Generating a Group Policy, Modeling Report, Generating a Group Policy Results Report Unit 10. Implementing Administrative Templates and Audit Policy 5 Hrs. Overview of Security in Windows Server 2003, Using Security Templates to Secure Computers, Testing Computer Security Policy, Configuring Auditing Managing Security Logs, Creating a Custom Template, Testing a Custom Template, Deploying a Custom, Template by Using a GPO, Configuring and Testing Security Audits of Organizational Units Laboratory works: Project on each unit Text Books: Managing a Microsoft Server 2003 Environment Homework Assignment: Assignment should be given from the above units in throughout the semester. Computer Usage: No Specific Prerequisite: Student should have a strong understanding of Microsoft Windows Server Category Content: Science Aspect: 50% Design Aspect: 50%
    • Course Title: Implementing, Managing and Maintaining Server (Network Infrastructure, Network Services) Course no: CSC-405 Full Marks: 70+10+20 Credit hours: 3 Pass Marks: 28+4+8 Nature of course: Theory (3 Hrs.) + Lab (3 Hrs.) Course Synopsis: Students with the knowledge and skills to implement, manage, and maintain a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 network infrastructure. Goals: Implementing a network access infrastructure by configuring the connections for remote access clients; and managing and monitoring network access. Course Contents: Unit 1. Configuring Routing by Using Routing and Remote Access 3 Hrs. 1.1 Multimedia: The Role of Routing in the Network Infrastructure, 1.2 Enabling and Configuring the Routing and Remote Access Service, 1.3 Configuring Packet Filters Unit 2. Allocating IP Addressing by Using Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) 7 Hrs. Multimedia: The Role of DHCP in the Network Infrastructure, Adding and Authorizing a DHCP Server Service, Configuring a DHCP Scope, Configuring a DHCP Reservation, Configuring DHCP Options, Configuring a DHCP Relay Agent Unit 3. Managing and Monitoring Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) 4 Hrs. Managing a DHCP Database, Monitoring DHCP, Applying Security Guidelines for DHCP Unit 4. Resolving Names 5 Hrs. Multimedia: Introduction to the Name Resolution Process, Viewing Names on a Client, Configuring Host Name Resolution, Configuring NetBIOS Name Resolution Unit 5. Resolving Host Names by Using Domain Name System (DNS) 5 Hrs. Multimedia: The Role of DNS in the Network Infrastructure, Installing the DNS Server Service, Configuring the Properties for the DNS Server Service, Configuring the DNS Zones, Configuring DNS Zone Transfers, Configuring DNS Dynamic Updates, Configuring a DNS Client, Delegating Authority for Zones Unit 6. Managing and Monitoring Domain Name System (DNS) 6 Hrs. Configuring the Time-to-Live Value, Configuring Aging and Scavenging, Integrating DNS and WINS, Testing the DNS Server Configuration, Verifying that a Resource
    • Record Exists by Using Nslookup, DNSCmd, and DNSLint, Monitoring DNS Server Performance Unit 7. Resolving NetBIOS Names by Using Windows Internet Name Service (WINS) 5 Hrs. Multimedia: The Role of WINS in the Network Infrastructure, Installing and Configuring a WINS Server, Managing Records in WINS, Configuring WINS Replication, Managing the WINS database Unit 8. Securing Network Traffic by Using IPSec and Certificates 2 Hrs. Implementing IPSec, Implementing IPSec with Certificates, Monitoring IPSec Unit 9. Configuring Network Access 6 Hrs. Introduction to a Network Access Infrastructure, Configuring a VPN Connection, Configuring a Dial-up Connection, Configuring a Wireless Connection, Controlling User Access to a Network, Centralizing Network Access Authentication and Policy Management by Using IAS Unit 10. Managing and Monitoring Network Access 2 Hrs. Managing the Network Access Services, Configuring Logging on a Network Access Server, Collecting and Monitoring Network Access Data Laboratory works: Project on each unit Text Books: Implementing, Managing and Maintaining Server 2003 Network Infrastructure Network Services Reference: Do Homework Assignment: Assignment should be given from the above units in throughout the semester. Computer Usage: No Specific Prerequisite: Students should have a strong understanding of Microsoft Windows® Server 2003. Category Content: Science Aspect: 50% Design Aspect: 50%
    • Course Title: Web Database and Information Systems Course no: CSC-409 Full Marks: 70+10+20 Credit hours: 3 Pass Marks: 28+4+8 Nature of course: Theory (3 Hrs.) + Lab (3 Hrs.) Course Synopsis: Advanced aspects of web database and data mining Goals: To study advanced aspects of web database and data mining, encompassing the principles, research results and commercial application of the current technologies. Course Contents: Unit 1. Overview of Database Systems 1 Hrs. Unit 2. The Entity-Relationship Model 2 Hrs. Unit 3. The Relational Model 3 Hrs. Unit 4. SQL 4 Hrs. Unit 5. Other Relational Languages 2 Hrs. Unit 6. Integrity and Security 3 Hrs. Unit 7. Relational Database Design 2 Hrs. Unit 8. Object-Oriented Databases 4 Hrs. Unit 9. Object-Relational Databases 4 Hrs. Unit 10. XML and Web Databases 6 Hrs. Unit 11. Data Storage, File Structures and Indexing 6 Hrs. Unit 12. Database System Architectures 3 Hrs. Unit 13. Application Development and Administration 3 Hrs. Unit 14. Advanced Querying and Information Retrieval 5 Hrs. Laboratory Projects: Design and development of Web database using XML. Text Books: 1. Database System Concepts (4th Edition), Silberschatz, Korth, and Sudarshan, 2002. 2. Oracle 9i Programming: A Primer, Rajshekhar Sunderraman, 2003 Homework Assignment: Assignment should be given from the throughout the semester. Computer Usage: No specific Prerequisite: C, Database, Object Oriented Programming (C++ or Java) Category Content: Science Aspect: 25% Design Aspect: 75%
    • Course Title: Advanced Database and Information System Course no: CSC-410 Full Marks: 70+10+20 Credit hours: 3 Pass Marks: 28+4+8 Nature of course: Theory (3 Hrs.) + Lab (3 Hrs.) Course Synopsis: Advanced aspects of web database and data mining Goal: In-depth study of relational database management system and the issues involved in designing efficient database systems, and the strategies, data-structures, and algorithms used in the implementation of such systems. Introducing basic issues of grid computing and peer-to-peer database. Course Contents: Unit 1. The Physical Database: 8 Hrs. File organizations, indexes, tree-structured indexing, hash-based indexes, external sorting Unit 2. Query Processing: 10 Hrs. Evaluation of relational operators, selection, projection, joins, set operations, aggregate operations, physical database design and tuning. Unit 3. Query Optimization: 14 Hrs. Rewrite optimization, semantic query optimization, magic sets, cost optimization, cost model, selectivity estimation, new paradigms in query. Unit 4. Advanced Topics: 16 Hrs. Peer-peer data sharing architectures, data grids, data mining, logic foundations, semantic databases, spatial and temporal databases, and knowledge bases Laboratory works: Analysis, design and development of efficient relational database. Text Books: Database Management Systems, 3rd 2003: Raghu Ramakrishnan and Johannes Gehrke Databases and Transaction Processing, an Application-Oriented Approach: Philip M. Lewis, Arthur Bernstein, and Micheal KiferGoals Homework Assignment: Assignment should be given throughout the semester. Computer Usage: No specific Prerequisite: C, Database, SQL Category Content: Science Aspect: 40% Design Aspect: 60%
    • Course Title: Distributed and Object Oriented Database Course no: CSC-411 Full Marks: 70+10+20 Credit hours: 3 Pass Marks: 28+4+8 Nature of course: Theory (3 Hrs.) + Lab (3 Hrs.) Course Synopsis: Design and development of distributed database systems Goal: This course introduces fundamental concept and implementation of object oriented and distributed database systems with focus on data distribution, transaction processing, concurrency control and recovery. Course Contents: Unit 1. Introduction to Object Oriented Database: 6 Hrs. Abstraction, encapsulation, and information hiding, Classes, Inheritance Overloading Polymorphism and dynamic binding. Unit 2. Introduction to Database Implementation and Distributed Database Systems Distributed Databases 6 Hrs. Transparency, performance and reliability. The concept and role of the transaction in distributed computing. Introduction to distributed architectures. Unit 3. Distributed Database Architectures 5 Hrs. Distributed and parallel databases concepts – autonomy, distribution, and heterogeneity. Client/server, parallel and distributed architectures. Unit 4. Distributed Database Design 4 Hrs. Design strategies. Horizontal, vertical and hybrid fragmentation. Resource allocation. Unit 5. Introduction to Transaction Management 3 Hrs. Transaction model and properties. Transaction structure. Transaction serialization and recovery. Unit 6. Concurrency Control I 4 Hrs. Lock based concurrency control. Multi-phase locking protocols. Timestamp ordering. Serialization. Unit 7. Concurrency Control II 6 Hrs. Optimistic concurrency control. Deadlock management – detection, avoidance, and resolution. Distributed deadlock. Structured (top actions, distributed nested) transactions.
    • Unit 8. Recovery I 7 Hrs. Failure analysis. Reliability and availability. Sources of failure. Recovery techniques: shadow paging and write-ahead logging. Memory and storage management (Undo/redo and steal/force) Unit 9. Commit Protocols 7 Hrs. Two Phase Commit, Presumed abort, presumed commit. Three phase commit. Partitions. Replication and voting. Shared-nothing DB. Scalability of replication. Laboratory works: Writing a distributed database components. Text Books: Database Systems Concepts; Silberschatz, Abraham, Henry F. Korth, and S. Sudarshan. Principles of Distributed Database Systems; Ozsu, M. Tamer and Patrick Valduriez Homework Assignment: Assignment should be given throughout the semester. Computer Usage: No specific Prerequisite: Database Management System, SQL, Category Content: Science Aspect: 40% Design Aspect: 60%
    • Course Title: Introduction of Oracle and XML Course no: CSC-412 Full Marks: 70+10+20 Credit hours: 3 Pass Marks: 28+4+8 Nature of course: Theory (3 Hrs.) + Lab (3 Hrs.) Course Synopsis: Developing database application using oracle and xml Goals: To study about Oracle and XML encompassing the principles, research results and commercial application of the current technologies. Course Contents: Unit 1. Oracle and XML 6 Hrs. Unit 2. Oracle’s XML CORE Technologies 6 Hrs. Unit 3. Developing for the Oracle9i Database 4 Hrs. Unit 4. Developing for Oracle Application Servers 6 Hrs. Unit 5. Oracle Internet File System 5 Hrs. Unit 6. Searching XML Documents with Oracle Text 5 Hrs. Unit 7. Oracle E-Business XML Services 5 Hrs. Unit 8. Oracle and XML in Action 5 Hrs. Unit 9. Oracle’s XML-Enabled Technology Stack 5 Hrs. Unit 10. XML- Based Application 2 Hrs. Laboratory works: Design and development of application using oracle and xml. Text Books: Oracle 9i XML Handbook: Ben Chang Homework Assignment: Assignment should be given throughout the semester. Computer Usage: No specific Prerequisite: Java Category Content: Science Aspect: 30% Design Aspect: 70%
    • Course Title: Application Server Web Administration Course no: CSC-413 Full Marks: 70+10+20 Credit hours: 3 Pass Marks: 28+4+8 Nature of course: Theory (3 Hrs.) + Lab (3 Hrs.) Course Synopsis: Aspects of application server using oracle 10g. Goal: Study of application server and web administration using oracle 10g. Here is an architectural and technical reference on how to use Oracle Application Server 10g to Web-enable Oracle databases for application server systems. Focus on coverage of installation, configuration, and tuning, using Java with Oracle Application Server 10g, and much more. Course Contents: Unit 1. Oracle Application Server 10g Architecture and Administration 4 Hrs. Unit 2. The Oracle Application Server 10g Infrastructure 4 Hrs. Unit 3. Installing Oracle Application Server 10g 2 Hrs. Unit 4. Using the Oracle HTTP Server (OHS) 4 Hrs. Unit 5. Web Cache Administration 5 Hrs. Unit 6. Using J2EE in the Application Server 10g 5 Hrs. Unit 7. Oracle Containers for J2EE 4 Hrs. Unit 8. Database Connections and Top Link 4 Hrs. Unit 9. High Availability 4 Hrs. Unit 10. Performance Tuning 4 Hrs. Unit 11. Backup and Recovery 4 Hrs. Unit 12. Oracle Application Server 10g Security 4 Hrs. Laboratory works: Analysis and use of application server Text Books: Oracle Application Server 10g Administration Handbook: Germany, John; Burleson, Donald K. Homework Assignment: Assignment should be given throughout the semester. Computer Usage: No specific Prerequisite: Server side programming language, java, database Category Content: Science Aspect: 25% Design Aspect: 75%
    • Course Title: Information Retrieval and Search Engine Course no: CSC-414 Full Marks: 70+10+20 Credit hours: 3 Pass Marks: 28+4+8 Nature of course: Theory (3 Hrs.) + Lab (3 Hrs.) Course Synopsis: Advanced aspects of Information Retrieval and Search Engine Goals: To study advance aspects of information retrieval and search engine, encompassing the principles, research results and commercial application of the current technologies. Course Detail: Unit 1. Introduction: 2 Hrs. Goals and history of IR. The impact of the web on IR. The role of artificial intelligence (AI) in IR. Unit 2. Basic IR Models: 4 Hrs. Boolean and vector-space retrieval models; ranked retrieval; text-similarity metrics; TF- IDF (term frequency/inverse document frequency) weighting; cosine similarity. Unit 3. Basic Tokenizing, Indexing, and Implementation of Vector-Space Retrieval: 4 Hrs. Simple tokenizing, stop-word removal, and stemming; inverted indices; efficient processing with sparse vectors; Java implementation. Unit 4. Experimental Evaluation of IR: 4 Hrs. Performance metrics: recall, precision, and F-measure; Evaluations on benchmark text collections. Unit 5. Query Operations and Languages: 3 Hrs. Relevance feedback; Query expansion; Query languages. Unit 6. Text Representation: 5 Hrs. Word statistics; Zipf's law; Porter stemmer; morphology; index term selection; using thesauri. Metadata and markup languages (SGML, HTML, XML). Unit 7. Search Engine: 5 Hrs. Search engines; spidering; metacrawlers; directed spidering; link analysis (e.g. hubs and authorities, Google PageRank); shopping agents.
    • Unit 8. Text Categorization and Clustering: 7 Hrs. Categorization algorithms: Rocchio; naive Bayes; decision trees; and nearest neighbor. Clustering algorithms: agglomerative clustering; k-means; expectation maximization (EM). Applications to information filtering; organization; and relevance feedback. Unit 9. Recommender Systems: 3 Hrs. Collaborative filtering and content-based recommendation of documents and products. Unit 10. Information Extraction and Integration: 3 Hrs. Extracting data from text; XML; semantic web; collecting and integrating specialized information on the web. Unit 11. Advanced IR Models: 3 Hrs. Probabilistic models; Generalized Vector Space Model; Latent Semantic Indexing (LSI). Unit 12. Advanced Indexing and Searching Text: 5 Hrs. Efficient string searching and pattern matching. Laboratory works: Design and development of search engine. Text Books: 1. Modern Information Retrieval, Ricardo Baeza-Yates, Berthier Ribeiro-Neto. 2. Information Retrieval; Data Structures & Algorithms: Bill Frakes Homework Assignment: Assignment should be given from the throughout the semester. Computer Usage: No specific Prerequisite: Server side programming language Category Content: Science Aspect: 25% Design Aspect: 75%
    • Course Title: Multimedia Database Course no: CSC-415 Full Marks: 70+10+20 Credit hours: 3 Pass Marks: 28+4+8 Nature of course: Theory (3 Hrs.) + Lab (3 Hrs.) Course Synopsis: advanced aspects of multimedia database, indexing and retrieval Goal: To study advanced aspects of indexing, storage device, retrieval of multimedia information encompassing the principles, research results and commercial application of the current technologies. Course Contents: Unit 1. Multimedia Introduction: 3 Hrs. Media Types, Text Document Information Retrieval, Need for MIRS, Indexing Unit 2. Multimedia Data Types and Formats: 3 Hrs. Text, Vector Graphics and Animation, Audio, Digital Images, Digital Video, Major Characteristics and Requirements of Multimedia Data and Applications Unit 3. Multimedia Database Design Issues: 2 Hrs. MIRS Architecture, Data Models, User Interface Design, Feature Extraction, Indexing and Similarity Measure Unit 4. Text Document Indexing and Retrieval: 5 Hrs. Automatic Text Document Indexing and Boolean Retrieval Model, Vector Space Retrieval Model, Probabilistic Retrieval Model, Cluster-Based Retrieval Model, Nontraditional IR methods, Performance measurement, WWW search engines Unit 5. Indexing and Retrieval of Audio: 2 Hrs. Audio properties, classification, speech recognition and retrieval, music indexing and retrieval Unit 6. Image Indexing and Retrieval: 5 Hrs. Color-Based Image Indexing and Retrieval Techniques, Image retrieval based on shape, on texture, Compressed image data, Integrated image indexing Unit 7. Video Indexing and Retrieval: 3 Hrs. Video shot detection or segmentation, video indexing and retrieval, video representation and abstraction
    • Unit 8. Integrated Multimedia Indexing and Retrieval: 2 Hrs. Architecture of Multimedia Information Management, User Interface, Example Systems Unit 9. Techniques and Data Structures for Efficient Multimedia Similarity Search: 5 Hrs. Filter process, B+ and B Trees, Clustering, Multidimensional B+ Tree, k-d Trees, Grid Files, Tree Family Unit 10. System Support for Distributed Multimedia Databases: 5 Hrs. QoS Management, Design Goals, Data Storage devices and management, data placement on disks, disk scheduling and admission control, server configuration and network connection Unit 11. Multimedia Computer Architectures and Operating System: 5 Hrs. Processor architectures, computer architectures, design issues of MOS, QoS support, Multimedia Networks, Transport Protocols, Synchronous presentation Unit 12. Measurement of Multimedia Information Retrieval Effectiveness: 4 Hrs. Humang Judgment Data, Recall and Precision Pari, Percentage of Weighted Hits, Similarity Ranking, Factors Affecting Retrieval Effectiveness Unit 13. Products, Application and New Developments: 4 Hrs. Multimedia search engine, digital libraries, Video-on-demand, Multimedia Security, MPEG-7 Laboratory works: Design and development of indexing and retrieval tools. Text Books: Multimedia Database Management Systems: Gunjoun Lu Homework Assignment: Assignment should be given throughout the semester. Computer Usage: No specific Prerequisite: Non Category Content: Science Aspect: 25% Design Aspect: 75%