NASSCOM Engineering Summit 2013: Managing multi generational work force - Puja Kohli, iPrimed
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NASSCOM Engineering Summit 2013: Managing multi generational work force - Puja Kohli, iPrimed Presentation Transcript

  • 1. • A huge pool of youthful talent in young India leading to a gradual juniorisation of workforces in the last decade especially in the IT/ITES sector for managing costs and building employability • A new set of values and ethos in the new generation (termed as millennial) influenced by an evolving socio cultural and economic climate • Rapid advancements in technology and evolution of multiple channels of communication and media. • Urban and semi urban talent acquisition efforts, leading to cultural and regional heterogeneity in workplaces • The youth exhibiting distinct differences in expectations from work and life compared to earlier generations • Pressure on traditional managerial styles and work environment to manage their aspirations and engagement The industry study on ‘multi generational workplaces- competencies at play’ was commissioned to explore this phenomena
  • 2. A simple definition of generation is a group of individuals born and living at the same time, most of whom are the same approximate age having similar ideas, attitudes and problems. A little more complex is the sociologist’s view, ‘generation’ viewed as a group of individuals of similar ages whose members have experienced a noteworthy historical event within a set period of time and hence the socio, political cultural environment during the formative and growing years influences and shapes their attitudes and beliefs forming a collective world view. Puja Kohli & Associates
  • 3.  Overview of the study  Objective  Hypothesis  Framework  List of participating organizations  Respondent demographics- Highlights  Executive Summary  Decoding the millennial  Values, World Views, Work Ethics, Relationships, Commitment, Respect  Attributes  Role Models  Gender Nuances  Socio Cultural Nuances  Lessons for the corporate sector  The need for change  Moving forward  New Competencies  Detailed Findings  Detailed demographics  Detailed analyses of multiple choice responses  Appendix Interpersonal
  • 4.  Overview of the study  Objective  Hypothesis  Framework  List of participating organizations  Respondent demographics- Highlights  Executive Summary  Decoding the millennial  Values, World Views, Work Ethics, Relationships, Commitment, Respect  Attributes  Role Models  Gender Nuances  Socio Cultural Nuances  Lessons for the corporate sector  The need for change  Moving forward  New Competencies  Detailed Findings  Detailed demographics  Detailed analyses of multiple choice responses  Appendix Interpersonal
  • 5.  The focus of the study is to explore ‘Competencies’ needed to manage the millennial in a multi generational work environment.  The millennial are exhibiting distinctly different behaviours having grown in an era of plenty, and amidst societal, cultural and technological changes that are shaking traditional managerial styles and working environments.  The study aims to create an industry wide perspective by targeting organizations and gathering data both through quantitative and qualitative means.
  • 6. Based on our continued research over the last two years around generations and the organization, we have developed the hypotheses that both the home environment and the organization needs to be explored to conclude on the competencies required to manage the millennial at the workplace
  • 7. The study aims at understanding the following:  The dilemma and role of parents today  The dilemma and role of managers today  The expectations and aspiration of Gen Y & Z as a child and as a member of an organization
  • 8.  A quantitative technique with a multi choice questionnaire administered to an identified target population. The multi choice questions were responded with a single correct answer/with multiple correct answers Free text answers and stories gathered
  • 9. The respondents polled as ‘Parents’ were born between 1950 to 1969 representing primarily the generation known as Free Gen and Gen X The respondents polled as ‘Child’ were born 1980 onwards representing the generation known as Gen Y and Gen Z or the ‘millennial’ The respondents polled as ‘Managers’ were born between 1970 to 1979 representing primarily the generation known as E Gen The respondents polled as ‘Employee’ were born 1980 onwards representing the generation known as Gen Y and Gen Z or the ‘millennial’
  • 10.  Overview of the study  Objective  Hypothesis  Framework  List of participating organizations  Respondent demographics- Highlights  Executive Summary  Decoding the millennial  Values, World Views, Work Ethics, Relationships, Commitment, Respect  Attributes  Role Models  Gender Nuances  Socio Cultural Nuances  Lessons for the corporate sector  The need for change  Moving forward  New Competencies  Detailed Findings  Detailed demographics  Detailed analyses of multiple choice responses  Appendix Interpersonal
  • 11.  7931 members across multiple generations participated in the overall study with a survey completion by ~5400 respondents  The study was conducted across 10 organizations from the IT/ITES industry with employee strength ranging from ~ 3000 to more than 100000  Gen Y and Gen Z contributing 76% of the working population, E-Gen at 15% and Gen X and Free Gen with about 9%. 2067 responses 597 responses were received were received from employees in from employees in their respondent their respondent role as ‘Child’ role as ‘Parents’ 1939 responses 868 responses were received were received from employees in from employees in their respondent their respondent role as ‘Employees’ role as ‘Managers’ Click for view on additional demographic cuts
  • 12. Based on responses by 868 Managers, on the elements that impact workplace differences which have been observed through members of their teams and the organization at large 120% 100% 13% 5% 9% 36% 80% 38% 34% 23% 30% 60% 38% 40% 32% 39% 42% Values Age and Experience 0% 18% 19% 4% Gender Thinking style (conservative vs progressive) 4-Never 3-Somewhat 2-Often 30% 18% 39% 46% 20% 16% 18% 29% 9% 14% Multi-culture (regional, ethnic background) 1-Most Often Upbringing and exposure (Metro, City, Town, Village) According to managerial observations : Age & Experience, Thinking Styles predominantly feature as some of the top elements that impact workplace behaviors.
  • 13.  Overview of the study  Objective  Hypothesis  Framework  List of participating organizations  Respondent demographics- Highlights  Executive Summary  Decoding the millennial  Values, World Views, Work Ethics, Relationships, Commitment, Respect  Attributes  Role Models  Gender Nuances  Socio Cultural Nuances  Lessons for the corporate sector  The need for change  Moving forward  New Competencies  Detailed Findings  Detailed demographics  Detailed analyses of multiple choice responses  Appendix Interpersonal
  • 14.  VALUES  INTERPERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS  COMMITMENT  WORLD VIEW  WORK ETHICS/ATTITUDE  ADDITIONAL INSIGHTS
  • 15. World View AT HOME Positive strength AT WORK • The Millennial develops his/ her value system primarily through self experience rather than learning second hand from authority figures such as parents/ teachers. • Excellence /Perfection is the least picked up value while growing up • He/ she is comparatively more Honest and Truthful and has a higher Respect for Self than earlier generations and they demand the same from all their relationships • Excellence / Perfection and Transparency are significant areas of struggle for the millennial employee and these values have a direct impact on delivery quality at the workplace. • Loyalty is not considered to be an important value. • Though the millennial employee does not struggle with displaying a Positive Attitude, he/she did not realize its importance while growing up Area of Development Needs to be considered with implications Potential Risk Click for a detailed view of Values
  • 16.  ATTRIBUTES  QUALITATIVE INSIGHTS  RISK TAKING ABILITY  BEING COLLABORATIVE  BEING SELF MOTIVATED
  • 17.  The most admired quality by far is the Adventurous, free spirited, fun loving nature of Gen Y & Z  Other admired qualities include their  comfort with technology  confidence  creativity  ability to be connected and sociable and  their informal/ friendly approach  Least admired or perhaps not sufficiently displayed are the qualities related to  risk taking  being collaborative and being self motivated
  • 18.  ROLE MODEL  QUALITATIVE INSIGHTS  EMERGING DEFINITION OF A FRIEND  EMERGING DEFINITION OF A PARENT  TRUSTED CAREER ADVISOR
  • 19.  As observed through the study, “Friends" occupy the primary position for the youth as a 'role model' in their lives.  Parents (both father and mother) still hold the next position as role model in their child's life, followed by famous personalities from the corporate world (42%). This suggests an overwhelming influence of the corporate world in the lives of the millennial.  Belief in a diverse world view as symbolized by politicians and activists, social workers, teacher/mentor, has all been rated low. The trend clearly demonstrates the emergence of a ‘Friend’ as a primary influencer and a significant drop in the role of educational environment and faculties which used to be a key influencer beyond homes in the past.
  • 20. Aspects of career guidance the millennial look for in their trusted advisors Parents Friends/ Peer Manager     The growth prospects of the organization; image & stability How to handle difficult situations & meet expectations at work Personal experience sharing – stories of past excellence Value-Benefit of opportunities through objective discussions for evaluating job, culture, colleagues etc  Financial management ** Father features predominantly; Mother – for ‘education’ & stress handling  Understanding of available opportunities  Happiness Factor: how does one seek emotional engagement in the workplace  Factors that build employability & market relevant skills  Knowledge sharing, keeping abreast with technology trends, and areas of specialization  Technical support : Project Handling Tips  Feedback/ Opinion about current state or dynamics at work e.g. how to deal with difficult managers, cultural or transition issues  Work challenges & resolutions for task at hand  Certification opportunities  Best practice sharing  Performance Factors  Areas of Improvement Other Confidantes: Sibling or in law Spouse Mentor Teacher
  • 21.  GENDER NUANCES  INFERENCES  SOCIO CULTURAL NUANCES  QUALITATIVE INSIGHTS  CHILD SPEAK: INSTANCES OF INTERGENERATIONAL CONFLICTS
  • 22.              Traditions & Customs Religious beliefs – value of ‘GOD’ Marriage – especially Inter caste, love Caste system Gender based differences Superstitions Mindsets or thinking styles..resistance to change, risk taking Relatives & extended family relationships, attending functions Higher education Pace & outcome of decision making Finances, Expenses Hobbies, interests Attire, entertainment – late night, dining out, friends NOTE: Older generation definition by the youth (for this section) •Parents •Grand Parents •Relatives Qualitative comments & stories of inter generational conflict reveal a predominant traditional mindset reflective of the socio cultural backgrounds from where the millennial talent hails Recurring theme…God, superstitions, inter caste marriage, values & beliefs, difference between girl & boy – freedom for education, working, marriage choice and age.
  • 23.  Overview of the study  Objective  Hypothesis  Framework  List of participating organizations  Respondent demographics- Highlights  Executive Summary  Decoding the millennial  Values, World Views, Work Ethics, Relationships, Commitment, Respect  Attributes  Role Models  Gender Nuances  Socio Cultural Nuances  Lessons for the corporate sector  The need for change  Moving forward  New Competencies  Detailed Findings  Detailed demographics  Detailed analyses of multiple choice responses  Appendix Interpersonal
  • 24.  THE NEED FOR CHANGE  EMERGING ROLE OF MANAGER  EMERGING WORK ENVIRONMENT  QUALITATIVE INSIGHTS: PASSION & CAREER  COMMENTARY : WORKFORCE DIVERSITY
  • 25. The new age employee is demanding a new world order, and an eco system to flourish his or her own career…their view of an engaging world is one  that provides opportunity to build skills & competencies  that is friendly with approachable managers  that gives freedom & empowerment with flexible policies & systems  that encourages objective dialogue and inclusion in decision making  that nurtures creativity by failing & learning rather than always following standard prescribed processes.  that is moving from ‘Plan-Control-Review’ to ‘Engage-Incentivize-Flexible’  that is sensitive to work life balance and personal time offs The work place environment seems to be at conflict with the environment that the millennial have grown up in. This, however does not compromise with the focus on ensuring discipline in a balanced manner, reinforcing values and working with other dilemmas that are being expressed.
  • 26.  MOVING FORWARD  RECOMMENDATIONS FOR THE CORPORATE SECTOR  EMERGING COMPETENCIES  BUILDING GENERATIONAL COMPETENCE  EMPLOYEE SPEAK: RECOMMENDATIONS TO MANAGE YOUTH  PARENTS SPEAK: COACHING TIPS FOR ORGANIZATIONS
  • 27.       Keep the Youth Informed about the good & bad – Be HONEST & Avoid NEGATIVITY Open Door Policy Emotionally engage & build family connect Flexibility in work timings and attire Listen and understand their perspectives. Provide opportunities that utilize their skills rather than fitting their skills to the job at hand       Be approachable, break down all closed office spaces..develop informal relationship to get insights into the next gen thinking Encourage innovation. Create Social Networks – intra organizational Build Role Models Sensitize on long term career visioning through various platforms. Reward ethics. Reward soft skills. Reward loyalty. Reward perseverance. Reward honesty and integrity…and not just financial awards or performance
  • 28. Advice for the Organization by Parents Traditional methods of work place policies do not work anymore…Be ready to change work place policies, every year if required, based on the changing needs and demands of the youth today. One size fits all was not an efficient way to create org people policies in the past and it is even more inefficient today since the diversity in their aspirations is way too high due to the recent diversity in the environment in which they have been brought up. The hygiene dimensions of professional world must change. The professional and social ecosystem must nurture the right honest and fair system of promoting the right activities to induce the right behavior systematically so as to align the people naturally. The role of the seniors in making this a very important and the message of only the right and fair things will get patronized must be clearly sent.
  • 29. Is our personality progressive & adaptable? Are we culturally aligned to meet the aspirations of a youthful workforce? Do we recognize contrasting values? Are we comfortable with change? Do careers inspire a long term commitment?
  • 30. High Level Overview of Intervention Building Generational Competence - a custom approach for organizations Phase 1 Understanding & Alignment Phase 2 Preparing the Business Case Deploying the Cycle of Change Generational Cohorts: deep dive Stakeholder alignment on Research Findings (Master Industry Report: Managing in a Multigenerational Workplace) to establish the significance through data and pattern generation Synopsis http://nasscom.org/managingmultigenerational-workplacenasscomiprimed-study Contextual Framework specific for Organization Reframe Renew Realign Road map For further details on the master report and intervention, refer next slide for contacts This model is the intellectual property of the author
  • 31. Master Report NASSCOM Members : Rs.12000/NON NASSCOM Members: Rs 15000/- Understanding the Intervention Contact Puja Kohli :puja@pujakohli.com For organizations who are interested to partner with us and deploy the custom intervention, the report will be available at a discounted rate as part of the intervention toolkit.
  • 32.  Overview of the study  Objective  Hypothesis  Framework  List of participating organizations  Respondent demographics- Highlights  Executive Summary  Decoding the millennial  Values, World Views, Work Ethics, Relationships, Commitment, Respect  Attributes  Role Models  Gender Nuances  Socio Cultural Nuances  Lessons for the corporate sector  The need for change  Moving forward  New Competencies  Detailed Findings  Detailed demographics  Detailed analyses of multiple choice responses  Appendix Interpersonal
  • 33. Appendix
  • 34. Gender - Age 100% 83% 80% 88% 75% 84% 60% 60% 40% 40% 16% 12% 20% 0% 60's 70's 80's 25% Female Male 90's Language preferred - Age 70% 62% 60% 50% 40% 31% 30% 54% 51% 49% 29% 14% 12% 10% 0% 70's 80's Official language - Hindi 90's 25% 21% 48% 70's 18% 14% 23% Metro City 11% Town 16% 43% 0% 20% 15% 40% 21% 25% 60% 10% Village 17% 80% 100% 120% The graph clearly shows a skew towards having been born and brought up in a metro for the older generation (e.g. 60’s) to a significant drop for the 80’s with a more equitable distribution of talent having been raised in cities, towns and villages. Attire - Place of Residence, First 15 years Age (80's) The preference is Metro 49% 24% City 28% 40% Town Village 0% 20% Semi Formal Casual Business Formal 42% 26% 40% for semi formal and casual dressing for millennial Traditional/ Ethnic 43% 25% There is a downward trend for the preference for English between those born in the 50’s & 60’s and those born in the 80’s & 90’s 12% 29% 53% 60's English Mother tongue 20% 37% 80's 60% 23% 60's 43% 90's Local language 20% 50's Place of Residence, First 15 years 50's 17% 50's Organizations have a far healthier gender ratio for the millennial workforce than those born between 50's and 70's 60% Back
  • 35. Values What is the value system of the youth today? What do they struggle with and how does this impact their performance at work? Parents The values that have undergone maximum change over time in the youth of today Managers Values that do not get exhibited consistently by the millennial Employees Values that are important in the workplace and were unaware of its relevance in the growing years Child Important values picked up during the growing years
  • 36. Highlights  Excellence/ Perfection - Managers have selected this value as the one that is least consistently displayed by the millennial at the workplace and it is also amongst the top 3 values that employees say they were not aware of while growing up. This resonates with the millennial rating this as one of the least picked up values while growing up and parents also including this amongst the top 3 values that have undergone maximum shift from earlier generations  Transparency - Like excellence /perfection, transparency is another value which employees seem to struggle with at the workplace and which does not seem to be a value inculcated at home during their growing years  Loyalty - Parents and Managers agree that Loyalty is a value that the millennial struggles with while millennial themselves do not see this as an area of importance/ concern.  Respect for Self and others and Honesty/ Truthfulness - The resonance of these top two values between parents and youth, seems to indicate a positive change from the value systems held by earlier generations.’ The comparatively neutral responses indicate that at the workplace these values are not an area of struggle  Positive attitude - Though the millennial employee picked up this value while growing up and does not struggle as much with it at the workplace, they were least aware of its importance while growing up.
  • 37. PARENT MANAGER While the top 3 observations are similar for parents, irrespective of gender, additionally fathers (33%) believe the value of 'bonding' and 'positive attitude' have undergone large change, while mothers (30%) believe 'humility' has undergone large change Parents born and brought up in the villages (11% respondents), have additionally observed some values which have undergone minimum change - Humility, Integrity and fairness, Loyalty CHILD Managers born in villages (11% of respondents) additionally believe that employees struggle with consistently displaying the values of integrity and fairness, bonding and respect for self and others ahead of transparency Managers without overseas work experience (41% respondents) have identified honesty/ truthfulness among the top 3 values not consistently displayed overshadowing Loyalty EMPLOYEE Employees born and brought up in villages (12%) have included respect for self and others and honesty and truthfulness among the top values that they have learnt are important in the work place Employees without overseas work experience (66%) have included honesty and truthfulness ahead of loyalty as a value they were unaware of being important while growing up % here, is the distribution of respondents and not the responses e.g. 33% of the respondents who are fathers made an observation Women have included faith (in oneself and others) as a value they picked up to a lesser extent while growing up while Men have added 'bonding' to this list Millennials who spent their growing years in villages have included 'bonding' as a value they least picked up at home  The value of 'bonding' is emerging as a significant one that male millennial and those born in villages struggle with indicative of cultural stereotypes at play  Parents and Managers who spent their growing years in villages, have identified ‘integrity and fairness’ as a value that has undergone a change in the millennial and one they struggle with at the workplace  Managers and Employees without overseas work experience have identified ‘honesty and truthfulness’ as an area of struggle contrary to general perception
  • 38.  There has been a possible dilution of passing down values, beliefs and learnings through generations which was the traditional mode of moral education in Indian households.  The learning of values seem to be more situation based or real-time  The values education through ' schools and teachers' seems to be disappointingly low with a score of only 21% high and ranking close to the bottom.
  • 39.            Honesty & integrity Patience & understanding before giving solutions Humility in interactions Adaptability to diverse situations Learning from mistakes Transparency with the end customer or partner Excellence & perfection Value - belief in organization & self Tenure (loyalty) Positive attitude Maintaining cultural identity yet flexibility to adapt to other cultures
  • 40.  While the youth today is stronger in some values that differentiate them from earlier generations, there seems to be a perceived dilution of value education at home and in educational institutions indicated by the struggle expressed by parents and the application of values @ work. Additionally, there also seems a need to redefine some norms to accept newer ways of thinking and behaving, or the gap between traditional outlook and actions taken by the next generation would keep increasing.  Parents, Managers and Employees having selected ‘excellence and perfection ’ as an area of struggle for millennial is perhaps reflective of a general lowering of standards in the education machinery in India which then conflict with workplace expectations which have become global and more demanding. Teachers and schools being ranked low as a source of value education further enhances this inference.  Organizations should seek to inculcate / enhance the values of 'excellence and perfection' and 'transparency' in their young workforce as these influence the delivery of work and the potential to grow.
  • 41.  Given that the millennial imbibes values better through life experiences perhaps an experiential approach towards enhancing these values at the workplace will have the desired impact.  It may also be worthwhile to re-examine the meaning and importance of ‘loyalty’ as it is traditionally understood versus how it applies to the millennial employee and help Managers deal with this new reality.  The lower rating for the value of 'respect for self and others' resonates with managers and millennial with roots in villages indicating that this particular sub group of employees may need additional help with demonstrating this value at the workplace.  Similarly millennial employees without overseas work experience seem to struggle more with 'honesty and truthfulness' and this is endorsed by managers as well; perhaps exposure to other cultures and work ethics enhances this particular value. Back
  • 42.  Saundarya Rajesh, Breaking the Generational Divide - Understanding the Indian Woman Professional.  Puja Kohli, Being Aware of Accommodating and Arbitraging, CGI & NASSCOM, 2011  Puja Kohli, Understanding your Workforce. SHRM, 2012  Prosumer Report: The Emergence of New Customer, EURO RSCG WORLDWIDE, 2010.  Prosumer Report: Millennials: The Challenger Generation, EURO RSCG WORLDWIDE, 2011  Tom Verghese, Generational Diversity in the Today’s Workplace, 2009  Beyond Generational Differences, Bridging Gender & Generational Diversity at Work, CATALYST, 2010
  • 43. Puja Kohli - Organizational Development, People and Change Management Specialist Puja has about 15 years of experience with multi nationals in India across the services industry providing strategic HR thought to shape the human capital strategy and enabling a diverse culture. Navin Kumar – CEO & Founder, iPRIMED Navin is the CEO and Founder of iPRIMED in May 2009 – an organization focused on career management and enhancing employability of professionals by driving intrinsic transformation, led by people from the industry, leveraging a model under patent. Shubhra Shailee – Research & Marketing, iPRIMED (August 2010 – Present) At iPRIMED, Shubhra anchors research and publications in the online and print media. She helps in spreading iPRIMED’s philosophy through social media. Aparna George Aparna has 10+years of experience in Human Resources with Accenture and Mercer Human Resource Consulting across areas of the function including performance and career management, policies, internal controls and compliance.