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NASSCOM HR Summit 2013: Special Session II: From Industry Ready to job Ready:  Risks and Challenges
 

NASSCOM HR Summit 2013: Special Session II: From Industry Ready to job Ready: Risks and Challenges

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  • * As a part of the solution NASSCOM EDI has also taken on the mantel of a SSC - NFQ-National Vocational Qualifications Framework
  • As an Industry we think global w.rt business but act local. We have built the brand IT is India but over the last 2 decades we have been keep abreast with business transformations in both the global and domestic front by aout ability to adapt and adopt.We need some critical transformations in our human resource to address the requirement of the present and the future NASSCOM is the premier Trade Association and the Chamber of Commerce of the IT-ITeS industry in the country NASSCOM, through its Education & Skill Development Initiatives, works with its industry members and select academic institutions to help improve the quality and quantity of the employable workforce available to this industry. In this regard various short, medium and long term projects are undertaken to meet this objective. Whereas IT-ITeS Sector Skills Council NASSCOM (SSC) is an integral part of NASSCOM (National Association of Software and Service Companies) which is the trade association of IndianInformation Technology (IT) and Business Process Outsourcing (BPO) industry; and. Whereas SSC, the skill standard settingbody of theIT-ITeS Industry, is the education & skill development initiative of NASSCOM; works with its industry members and select academic and skill development institutions to help improve the quality and quantity of the employable workforce available to this industry
  • Description – Method for identification of organizations to be researched so as to have a fair representation of the respective sub-sectors. We used a statistical formula which highlighted a sample size of 80 companies. It was ensured that these represent all categories and key citiesSource – Industry inputs, primary research, secondary research
  • Entry Level is defined as 0-2 years. Entry Level job-roles have been identified as part of Occupational Mapping for the four sub-sectors. In the current phase OS are developed for entry level job-roles
  • It is important to differentiate the number of unique job-roles with the pyramid/span of control principle. Management structures usually include highest number of professionals at the entry level and the least numbers at the leadership levels. The OA indicates unique job-roles and not numbers of professionals. Number of unique job-roles is a representation of specialization- which , is usually highest at the middle level and lowest at the entry level.Key numbers to note are the numbers of Occupations and entry level job-roles.The number of job-roles identified for middle and leadership levels is likely to change, when a detailed validation exercise is conducted. This is likely to be conducted in Phase 2 and 3 when OS for Leadership and Middle Level roles will be conducted

NASSCOM HR Summit 2013: Special Session II: From Industry Ready to job Ready:  Risks and Challenges NASSCOM HR Summit 2013: Special Session II: From Industry Ready to job Ready: Risks and Challenges Presentation Transcript

  • Objective of the National Skills Mission National Skill Development Agency Role: Policy direction and review of spectrum of skill development efforts Central Ministriies Role: Implement skill development in the ministry National Skill Development Corporation (NSDC) Role: PPP initiative focused on promoting development and upgrading of skills Sector Skills Council (SSCs) Role: Complement the existing vocational education system in meeting the entire value chain’s requirements Up-skilling 500 million people in India by 2022 23 such high growth sectors have been identified by NSDC for formation of SSCs… National Skills Mission
  • 80% of the entrants into the workforce do not have the opportunity for skill training Only 10% of the total workforce in the country receive some kind of skill training Though 12 million people join the workforce every year, current skill capacity of the country is about 4 million In India, about 12 million people join the workforce each year Current skill capacity of the country is about four million India requires to enhance skilling and technical education capacity to about 15 million The overall labor productivity in India is much lower ($ 5.45 per person per hour while the figure for Mexico is $ 20.51) Only ~6% of the total workforce (459 million) is in the organized sector Difficulty in finding a suitable candidate for available jobs due to: • lack of available applicants • shortage of hard skills • Shortage of suitable employability, including soft skills India Scenario
  • Sector Skill Councils in India National Skills Development Corporation (NSDC) National Council on Skill Development SSCs (Sector Skills Councils) National level bodies feeding into development- based on employer needs & industry standards. National Skill Development Coordination Board SSCs Formalized Approved Under Formation In the Pipeline Security Organized RetailIT-ITeS Telecom Rubber Media & Entertainment Gems & Jewelry Plumbing Healthcare Construction Logistics Food Processing Leather Capital Goods BFSI Aeronautics Health & Beauty Life Sciences Pharma Textiles Apparels & Handicrafts Education & Skills Mining Steel Oil & Gas Manufacturing Building Hardware Automotive Electronics Agriculture Hospitality & Tourism Beauty & Wellness
  • SSCs in India Approved by NSDC Approved by NSDC SSC Proposals under Diligence with NSDC Auto Electronics Hardware Power Security Life Sciences Mining Retail Food Processing Construction Equipment IT/ITES Aerospace & Aviation Beauty & Wellness BFSI Iron & Steel Apparels & Textiles Leather Domestic Workers Media SSC Proposals in Pipeline Healthcare Handicrafts & Handlooms Gems & Jewelry Hospitality Rubber Chemicals Telecom Oil & Gas Agriculture Building Hardware Plumbing Manufacturing Construction and Real Estate Furniture & Furnishing Logistics & Transportation Sports (Special Sector) Capital Goods FMCG Priority Sectors Large Workforce Informal Sector
  • NASSCOM IT-ITes Sector Skills Council NASSCOM
  • Vision: • Create a sustainable industry- ready talent pipeline by scaling quality capacity Mission: • Develop occupational standards for the industry • Develop workforce MIS offering a single portal for all related activities • Conduct faculty development and subsequent student training • Promote employability assessments;standardize OS assessments and certification • Develop foundation and specialisation courses across industry verticals • Develop QA, accreditation norms and processes for occupational standards & related certifications, relevant programs / courses, training institutions; • Recommendations on standardization of affiliation and accreditation process in collaboration with relevant stakeholders IT-ITeS SSC - Mission
  • Key Deliverables from the OS Project Occupational Analysis • Occupational Analysis has the following for the four sub-sectors of IT Services, BPM, R&D and Software Product Development • Growth and talent trends • Key Occupations • Key Tracks within each Occupation • Unique entry level job-roles under each occupation/track Functional Analysis • Functional Analysis identifies the following for each job-role: • Key Purpose of the job-role • Sub-functions • Tasks/OS • Knowledge and Understanding • Skills Qualification Packs • A Qualification Pack, identifies the relevant occupational standard required for that job-role, plus the following: • Educational Qualifications, Experience, Training and Certification
  • Occupational Analysis – Organizations Researched Cities Number of companies in the sample set that have offices in this city Ahmadabad 9 Baroda 5 Bengaluru 45 Bhubaneswar 5 Chandigarh 5 Chennai 32 Coimbatore 6 Delhi NCR 35 Hyderabad 32 Jaipur 5 Kochi 9 Kolkata 17 Mumbai 31 Pune 30 Category representation City representation Developed through engagement of a broad section of companies and professionals from across segments through sessions in various cities Category of companies Target Numbers Actual Inputs Received ITS BPM ER&D SPD Total Multi-national companies 31 27 12 11 12 62 Small and Medium Enterprises 36 30 19 9 32 90 Global In-house Centers 13 4 4 6 3 17 Total 80 61 35 26 47 169
  • ‘Unique job-roles’ identified at the entry level Occupation Entry level ‘unique’ job-roles 10 Key Definitions: Occupation is a set of job roles, which perform similar/related set of functions in an industry. Tracks are a sub-set of occupations having similar set of functions under the larger gamut of the occupation they belong to Unique Job-roles defines a set of functions that together form a unique employment opportunity in an organization Entry Level: 0-2 yrs. Middle Level: 2-10 yrs. Leadership Level: >10 yrs.
  • Occupational Standards Summary  13 unique ‘Occupations / Horizontals’  39 unique ‘Tracks’  17 unique Job roles at the Entry Level  91 unique Job roles at the Middle Level  25 unique Job roles at the Leadership Level  10 unique ‘Occupations / Horizontals’  27 unique ‘Tracks’  16 unique Job roles at the Entry Level  111 unique Job roles at the Middle Level  30 unique Job roles at the Leadership Level  13 unique ‘Occupations / Horizontals’  15 unique ‘Tracks’  16 unique Job roles at the Entry Level  48 unique Job roles at the Middle Level  54 unique Job roles at the Leadership Level  12 unique ‘Occupations / Horizontals’  23 unique ‘Tracks’  18 unique Job roles at the Entry Level  63 unique Job roles at the Middle Level  21 unique Job roles at the Leadership Level Engineering and R&D (ERD) Software Products (SPD) IT Services (ITS) Business Process Management (BPM) - Total Occupations, Tracks and Roles Total Occupations / Horizontals 48 Total Tracks 104 Total Unique Entry Level Job Roles 67 Total Unique Middle Level Job Roles 313 Total Unique Leadership Level Job Roles 130 11
  • 12 ITS Sub-sector- Illustrative Career Map
  • UKCES journey Employers leveraged the NOS to meet their skills needs Source : http://www.ukces.org.uk/ourwork/standards-and-frameworks/nos Organization C: National Occupational Standards are making the petroleum industry safer and more efficient Organization B : uses National Occupational Standards to maintain its status as a brand leader Organization A: using National Occupational Standards (NOS) to assist in delivering high cost medical screening in Scotland
  • Stakeholder discussions •The CSCSC took help from stakeholders to prioritize its work, identifying seven functional areas and 26 occupations of the sector, these were generally high-demand occupations and those with immediate need for renewed training or skills development—needs that may have been driven by technological changes. Model Development •Then, using a model based on standards development in other jurisdictions and for other applications, standards were developed and then validated through consultations with key stakeholders from across the country Phased Implementatio n •The first phase of the project, completed in 2009, led to 15 national occupational standards. Each occupational standard includes required qualifications in terms of education, training and related work experience, a list of tasks in the role, tools and technologies used on the job, a catalogue of the knowledge, skills and personal attributes needed to succeed in the position, and an essential-skills profile. •The second phase, was started in 2010, and aimed to develop standards for the remaining occupations in the sector A framework for best practices - Canada Source :http://www.supplychaincanada.org/en/NOS CSCSC : Canadian Supply Chain Sector Council • The sector involves about 745,000 workers in Canada. • Amid emerging technologies and an expanding base for distribution and manufacturing, the need for national occupational standards was reflected in recommendations of a 2005 study that touched all aspects of the supply chain—from employers, organized labor and learning-system providers to career seekers and those already employed in the sector
  • Benefits for Stakeholders Training Institutes / Accreditation Agencies Policy Makers and Government Academia Talent / workforce Industry Stakeholders and the Benefits for each Stakeholder • Ensure supply of skilled manpower • Reduce talent acquisitions and training costs • Drive growth towards low cost Tier 2 and 3 cities • Ensure suitable interventions in the skilling domain • Growth in economy by generating revenues and exports • Provide opportunities to people • Profitable growth for the education sector • Training programs to be demand driven ensuring sustainability • Provide credible and reliable content • Develop employability of graduating students • Develop relevant curriculum for the requirements of the sector • Visibility of career options • Capability building for vertical and horizontal growth • Better standard of living SSCs value chain to develop the skill ecosystem in the country
  • Next Steps: Deployment of Qualification Packs The Qualification Packs (QP) for the 67 identified entry level job roles have been published by SSC NASSCOM. The proposed deployment for QPs is as follows:  Availability/Preparation of Courses w.r.t QP/OS  Course Conformity to QP/OS Certification  Identification & Certification of relevant Training Providers + specific sectors  Certified Trainers/ Certification of the Personnel based on QP/OS  Assessor, Assessment & Certification of Proficiency based on QP & OS  Maintenance of information on SSC NASSCOM website
  • 8 Actions you can take to transform the skills landscape 1. Participate in the SSC 2. Hire only SSC certified persons going forward – If the occupation standard is deficient please change it go for HCF not LCM! 3. Get all employees certified by SSCs in a period of two years. 4. Align your training programmes with NOS and partner with SSC to certify 5. Make it a condition that training partners, suppliers, contractors and service providers also hire certified persons. 6. Encourage your employees to work with the SSC to become trainers and assessors. 7. Incentivise employees to get certified – Pay a placement fee – Reimburse training fees after specified period of employment – Pay more for certified persons 8. Participate in the skill competitions
  • 21 SSCs approved and a strong pipeline 20 of the high priority sectors covered, move towards large and informal sectors Approved by NSDC Approved by NSDC SSC Proposals under Diligence with NSDC Auto Electronics Hardware Power Security Life Sciences Mining Retail Food Processing Construction Equipment IT/ITES Aerospace & Aviation Beauty & Wellness BFSI Iron & Steel Apparels & Textiles Leather Domestic Workers Media SSC Proposals in Pipeline Healthcare Handicrafts & Handlooms Gems & Jewelry Hospitality Rubber Chemicals Telecom Oil & Gas Agriculture Building Hardware Plumbing Manufacturing Construction and Real Estate Furniture & Furnishing Logistics & Transportation Sports (Special Sector) Capital Goods FMCG Priority Sectors Large Workforce Informal Sector ii