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Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
Product Management: Managers' Role
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Product Management: Managers' Role

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Session by Mr Satyajeet Singh, VP Product, Zomato.com …

Session by Mr Satyajeet Singh, VP Product, Zomato.com
during a product management workshop at New Delhi on 23rd May 2014 by NASSCOM and IPMA under its Product Management Express.
It is about:
Software Product Management: An Introductiion
What it take to be Great product Manager
Managers' Roles and Responsibilities

Published in: Business
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  • 1. Presents     Product  Management  Express   Pla4orm  1:  Market   Speakers   Abhishek  Logani   Satyajeet  Singh  
  • 2. Agenda     Module  1   -­‐  IntroducBon  to  Product  Management     -­‐  Roles  and  ResponsibiliBes   -­‐  What  makes  a  great  PM?       Module  2   -­‐  Idea  to  launch  process     -­‐  Discovering  needs   -­‐  TranslaBng  need  into  a  product  
  • 3. MODULE  1   IntroducBon  to  Product  Management       Roles  &  ResponsibiliBes       What  makes  a  great  Product  Manager?                                                      @satyajeet  
  • 4. MODULE  1   Introduc)on  to  Product  Management       Roles  &  ResponsibiliBes       What  makes  a  great  Product  Manager?                              
  • 5. What  is  product  management?   “Product  management  is  an  organizaBonal   lifecycle  funcBon  within  a  company  dealing   with  the  planning,  forecasBng,  or   markeBng  of  a  product  or  products  at  all   stages  of  the  product  lifecycle.”           hUp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Product_management  
  • 6. What  is  product  management?   “Product  management  is  what  product   managers  do.”      
  • 7. Who  is  a  product  manager?  
  • 8. Who  is  a  product  manager?   Product  +  Manager  
  • 9. Manager  
  • 10. Manager   “A  person  responsible  for  geYng  things  done.”  
  • 11. Product   BUSINESS   “a  product  is  anything  that  can  be  offered  to  a   market  that  might  saBsfy  a  want  or  need.”  
  • 12. Product   BUSINESS   “a  product  is  anything  that  can  be  offered  to  a   market  that  might  saBsfy  a  want  or  need.”     CHEMICAL   “a  substance  produced  during  a  natural,  chemical,   or  manufacturing  process.”    
  • 13. Product   BUSINESS   “a  product  is  anything  that  can  be  offered  to  a   market  that  might  saBsfy  a  want  or  need.”     CHEMICAL   “a  substance  produced  during  a  natural,  chemical,   or  manufacturing  process.”     MATHEMATICAL   “a  quanBty  obtained  by  mulBplying  quanBBes   together.”    
  • 14. MODULE  1   IntroducBon  to  Product  Management       Roles  &  Responsibili)es       What  makes  a  great  Product  Manager?                              
  • 15. Role  of  a  product  manager   § Envision     § Evangelize     § Execute  
  • 16. Envision   This  means  having  a  clear  picture  of  the  problem   you  are  trying  to  solve,  the  soluBon  and  the   strategy  that  will  lead  you  there.       It  requires  deep  understanding  of  target  users,  the   exisBng  soluBons  and  compeBtors  in  the  market   and  a  compelling  case  for  why  your  soluBon  will   win  over  the  exisBng  alternaBves.          
  • 17. Evangelize   An  equally  important  aspect  of  the  role  of  a   product  manager  is  evangelizing    your  vision  to   your  team.    The  more  you  focus  on  this  the  easier   it’ll  be  to  execute.       Once  the  team  is  convinced  with  your  vision,  you’ll   be  amazed  to  see  the  change  it’ll  bring  to  the   output.            
  • 18. Execute    “If  you  guys  were  the  inventors  of  Facebook,  you’d   have  invented  Facebook.”                      ~  The  Social  Network       It  is  one  of  the  most  criBcal  aspects  of  product   management  and  means  doing  whatever  it  takes  to   ensure  your  product  ships.    
  • 19. Football  Team   §  Manager    
  • 20. Football  Team   §  Manager   §  Coach  
  • 21. Football  Team   §  Manager   §  Coach   §  Referee  
  • 22. Football  Team   §  Manager   §  Coach   §  Referee   §  Striker    
  • 23. Football  Team   §  Manager   §  Coach   §  Referee   §  Striker     §  Goal  Keeper    
  • 24. Football  Team   §  Manager   §  Coach   §  Referee   §  Striker     §  Goal  Keeper     §  Football    
  • 25. Day  in  the  life  of  PM   §  AUend  to  urgent  and  important  
  • 26. Day  in  the  life  of  PM   §  AUend  to  urgent  and  important   §  AUend  daily  huddle  
  • 27. Day  in  the  life  of  PM   §  AUend  to  urgent  and  important   §  AUend  daily  huddle   §  Check  favourite  blogs,  news  on  products,  tech  and  markets  
  • 28. Day  in  the  life  of  PM   §  AUend  to  urgent  and  important   §  AUend  daily  huddle   §  Check  favourite  blogs,  news  on  products,  tech  and  markets   §  Check  current  release  status  
  • 29. Day  in  the  life  of  PM   §  AUend  to  urgent  and  important   §  AUend  daily  huddle   §  Check  favourite  blogs,  news  on  products,  tech  and  markets   §  Check  current  release  status   §  Check  past  release  performance  and  customer  issues  
  • 30. Day  in  the  life  of  PM   §  AUend  to  urgent  and  important   §  AUend  daily  huddle   §  Check  favourite  blogs,  news  on  products,  tech  and  markets   §  Check  current  release  status   §  Check  past  release  performance  and  customer  issues   §  Develop  detailed  plans  for  next  release  
  • 31. Day  in  the  life  of  PM   §  AUend  to  urgent  and  important   §  AUend  daily  huddle   §  Check  favourite  blogs,  news  on  products,  tech  and  markets   §  Check  current  release  status   §  Check  past  release  performance  and  customer  issues   §  Develop  detailed  plans  for  next  release   §  Make  Bme  for  compeBBve  research  and  analysis  
  • 32. Day  in  the  life  of  PM   §  AUend  to  urgent  and  important   §  AUend  daily  huddle   §  Check  favourite  blogs,  news  on  products,  tech  and  markets   §  Check  current  release  status   §  Check  past  release  performance  and  customer  issues   §  Develop  detailed  plans  for  next  release   §  Make  Bme  for  compeBBve  research  and  analysis   §  Make  Bme  to  build  relaBonships  with  internal  and  external   partners  
  • 33. How  to  work  with   § Sales       § Engineers   § Designers  
  • 34. Sales  
  • 35. Sales   §  Know  them  beUer  
  • 36. Sales   §  Know  them  beUer   §  Listen  to  their  input  and  suggesBons    
  • 37. Sales   §  Know  them  beUer   §  Listen  to  their  input  and  suggesBons     §  Spend  Bme  on  sales  calls    
  • 38. Sales   §  Know  them  beUer   §  Listen  to  their  input  and  suggesBons     §  Spend  Bme  on  sales  calls   §  Nurture  them    
  • 39. Sales   §  Know  them  beUer   §  Listen  to  their  input  and  suggesBons     §  Spend  Bme  on  sales  calls   §  Nurture  them     §  Answer  their  quesBons  before  they  are  asked  
  • 40. Sales   §  Know  them  beUer   §  Listen  to  their  input  and  suggesBons     §  Spend  Bme  on  sales  calls   §  Nurture  them     §  Answer  their  quesBons  before  they  are  asked   §  Join  them  in  firefighBng    
  • 41. Engineering  
  • 42. Engineering   §  Be  specific                          
  • 43. Engineering   §  Be  specific   §  Share  the  details  
  • 44. Engineering   §  Be  specific   §  Share  the  details   §  Involve  them  early  
  • 45. Engineering   §  Be  specific   §  Share  the  details   §  Involve  them  early   §  Always  tell  the  reasons  
  • 46. Engineering   §  Be  specific   §  Share  the  details   §  Involve  them  early   §  Always  tell  the  reasons   §  Never  commit  without  them  
  • 47. Engineering   §  Be  specific   §  Share  the  details   §  Involve  them  early   §  Always  tell  the  reasons   §  Never  commit  without  them   §  Streamline  process  
  • 48. Engineering   §  Be  specific   §  Share  the  details   §  Involve  them  early   §  Always  tell  the  reasons   §  Never  commit  without  them   §  Streamline  process   §  Respect  their  Bme  
  • 49. Engineering   §  Be  specific   §  Share  the  details   §  Involve  them  early   §  Always  tell  the  reasons   §  Never  commit  without  them   §  Streamline  process   §  Respect  their  Bme  
  • 50. Engineering   §  Be  specific   §  Share  the  details   §  Involve  them  early   §  Always  tell  the  reasons   §  Never  commit  without  them   §  Streamline  process   §  Respect  their  Bme   §  Trust  them    
  • 51. Engineering   §  Be  specific   §  Share  the  details   §  Involve  them  early   §  Always  tell  the  reasons   §  Never  commit  without  them   §  Streamline  process   §  Respect  their  Bme   §  Trust  them     §  Always  bring  the  donuts  :)     hUps://www.kennethnorton.com/essays/how-­‐to-­‐work-­‐with-­‐sohware-­‐engineers.html  
  • 52. Design   §  Stop  talking  about  metrics  and  start  talking   about  users.     §  Care  about  the  details   §  The  more  senior  the  designer,  the  more   abstract  the  problem  they  should  be  solving.   Julie  Zhuo  |  Product  design  director  @  Facebook  
  • 53. Design  
  • 54. Design   §  Stop  talking  about  metrics  and  start  talking   about  users.    
  • 55. Design   §  Stop  talking  about  metrics  and  start  talking   about  users.     §  Care  about  the  details    
  • 56. Design   §  Stop  talking  about  metrics  and  start  talking   about  users.     §  Care  about  the  details   §  The  more  senior  the  designer,  the  more   abstract  the  problem  they  should  be  solving.   Julie  Zhuo  |  Product  design  director  @  Facebook  
  • 57. Design   LEVEL  1:    Design  a  form  that  lets  people  edit  their  profile.  PreUy  scoped— assumes  there  is  a  profile,  and  that  the  soluBon  takes  the  shape  of  a  form.    
  • 58. Design   LEVEL  1:    Design  a  form  that  lets  people  edit  their  profile.  PreUy  scoped— assumes  there  is  a  profile,  and  that  the  soluBon  takes  the  shape  of  a  form.     Level  2:  Design  the  best  interface  for  users  to  edit  their  profile.  The  soluBon   could  be  a  form,  could  be  a  WYSIWYG  inline  editor,  could  be  a  modal  window.    
  • 59. Design   LEVEL  1:    Design  a  form  that  lets  people  edit  their  profile.  PreUy  scoped— assumes  there  is  a  profile,  and  that  the  soluBon  takes  the  shape  of  a  form.     Level  2:  Design  the  best  interface  for  users  to  edit  their  profile.  The  soluBon   could  be  a  form,  could  be  a  WYSIWYG  inline  editor,  could  be  a  modal  window.     Level  3  :  Design  a  way  to  get  users  to  want  to  update  their  profiles.  Here,  the   quesBons  the  designer  is  asking  is  why  should  users  update  their  profile?  And   when?  And  how  to  best  convey  the  value  proposiBon?    
  • 60. Design   LEVEL  1:    Design  a  form  that  lets  people  edit  their  profile.  PreUy  scoped— assumes  there  is  a  profile,  and  that  the  soluBon  takes  the  shape  of  a  form.     Level  2:  Design  the  best  interface  for  users  to  edit  their  profile.  The  soluBon   could  be  a  form,  could  be  a  WYSIWYG  inline  editor,  could  be  a  modal  window.     Level  3  :  Design  a  way  to  get  users  to  want  to  update  their  profiles.  Here,  the   quesBons  the  designer  is  asking  is  why  should  users  update  their  profile?  And   when?  And  how  to  best  convey  the  value  proposiBon?     Level  4  :  Design  a  soluBon  to  increase  the  authenBcity  of  users  among  your   app.  Maybe  ediBng  profiles  isn’t  even  the  right  thing  to  focus  on  for  our   ulBmate  goal,  maybe  a  peer-­‐review  system  would  be  beUer.  
  • 61. Design   LEVEL  1:    Design  a  form  that  lets  people  edit  their  profile.  PreUy  scoped— assumes  there  is  a  profile,  and  that  the  soluBon  takes  the  shape  of  a  form.     Level  2:  Design  the  best  interface  for  users  to  edit  their  profile.  The  soluBon   could  be  a  form,  could  be  a  WYSIWYG  inline  editor,  could  be  a  modal  window.     Level  3  :  Design  a  way  to  get  users  to  want  to  update  their  profiles.  Here,  the   quesBons  the  designer  is  asking  is  why  should  users  update  their  profile?  And   when?  And  how  to  best  convey  the  value  proposiBon?     Level  4  :  Design  a  soluBon  to  increase  the  authenBcity  of  users  among  your   app.  Maybe  ediBng  profiles  isn’t  even  the  right  thing  to  focus  on  for  our   ulBmate  goal,  maybe  a  peer-­‐review  system  would  be  beUer.     Level  5  :  IdenBfy  the  biggest  product  problem  with  the  app  and  design  a   soluBon.  At  the  highest  level,  the  best  designers  drive  the  vision  for  a  product.    
  • 62. Design   Designers  have  different  strengths.  These  strengths  should   be  applied  to  the  right  problems.   Visual  design:  typography,  contrast,  hierarchy,  and  the  good  ol’  does  it  look   good?  falls  into  this  category.  Do  your  eyes  fall  on  the  right  things?  Are  the   details  crisp  or  are  they  sloppy?  More  importantly,  does  the  visual  design   work  together  as  a  system?     Interac)on  design:  is  it  easy  and  clear  to  for  a  user  to  do  X?  Is  the  navigaBon   system  robust?  Do  transiBons  and  animaBons  feel  saBsfying  and  make  the   app  feel  more  intuiBve  to  use?     Product  design:  does  the  design  successfully  solve  a  problem?  Is  the  thing   that  is  designed  useful?  Does  it  have  a  clear  vision?  Does  it  contribute  value?    
  • 63. MODULE  1   IntroducBon  to  Product  Management       Roles  &  ResponsibiliBes       What  makes  a  great  Product  Manager?                              
  • 64. Top  1%  Product  Manager   Think  big     A  1%  PM's  thinking  won't  be  constrained  by  the  resources  available  to  them   today  or  today's  market  environment.  They'll  describe  large  disrupBve   opportuniBes,  and  develop  concrete  plans  for  how  to  take  advantage  of   them.  
  • 65. Top  1%  Product  Manager   Think  big     A  1%  PM's  thinking  won't  be  constrained  by  the  resources  available  to  them   today  or  today's  market  environment.  They'll  describe  large  disrupBve   opportuniBes,  and  develop  concrete  plans  for  how  to  take  advantage  of   them.     Communicate       A  1%  PM  can  make  a  case  that  is  impossible  to  refute  or  ignore.  They'll  use   data  appropriately,  when  available,  but  they'll  also  tap  into  other  biases,   beliefs,  and  triggers  that  can  convince  the  powers  that  be  to  part  with   headcount,  money,  or  other  resources  and  then  get  out  of  the  way.  
  • 66. Top  1%  Product  Manager   Think  big     A  1%  PM's  thinking  won't  be  constrained  by  the  resources  available  to  them   today  or  today's  market  environment.  They'll  describe  large  disrupBve   opportuniBes,  and  develop  concrete  plans  for  how  to  take  advantage  of   them.     Communicate       A  1%  PM  can  make  a  case  that  is  impossible  to  refute  or  ignore.  They'll  use   data  appropriately,  when  available,  but  they'll  also  tap  into  other  biases,   beliefs,  and  triggers  that  can  convince  the  powers  that  be  to  part  with   headcount,  money,  or  other  resources  and  then  get  out  of  the  way.     Simplify     A  1%  PM  knows  how  to  get  80%  of  the  value  out  of  any  feature  or  project   with  20%  of  the  effort.  They  do  so  repeatedly,  launching  more  and  achieving   compounding  effects  for  the  product  or  business.    
  • 67. Top  1%  Product  Manager   Priori)ze   They  know  how  to  sequence  projects.  They  balance  quick  wins  vs.  pla4orm   investments  appropriately.  They  balance  offense  and  defense  projects   appropriately.  Offense  projects  are  ones  that  grow  the  business.  Defense   projects  are  ones  that  protect  and  remove  drag  on  the  business.      
  • 68. Top  1%  Product  Manager   Priori)ze   They  know  how  to  sequence  projects.  They  balance  quick  wins  vs.  pla4orm   investments  appropriately.  They  balance  offense  and  defense  projects   appropriately.  Offense  projects  are  ones  that  grow  the  business.  Defense   projects  are  ones  that  protect  and  remove  drag  on  the  business.       Forecast  and  measure     They  are  able  to  forecast  the  approximate  benefit  of  a  project,  and  can  do  so   efficiently  by  applying  past  experience  and  leveraging  comparable   benchmarks.  They  also  measure  benefit  once  projects  are  launched,  and   factor  those  learnings  into  their  future  prioriBzaBon  and  forecasts.  
  • 69. Top  1%  Product  Manager   Priori)ze   They  know  how  to  sequence  projects.  They  balance  quick  wins  vs.  pla4orm   investments  appropriately.  They  balance  offense  and  defense  projects   appropriately.  Offense  projects  are  ones  that  grow  the  business.  Defense   projects  are  ones  that  protect  and  remove  drag  on  the  business.       Forecast  and  measure     They  are  able  to  forecast  the  approximate  benefit  of  a  project,  and  can  do  so   efficiently  by  applying  past  experience  and  leveraging  comparable   benchmarks.  They  also  measure  benefit  once  projects  are  launched,  and   factor  those  learnings  into  their  future  prioriBzaBon  and  forecasts.     Execute     They  do  whatever  is  necessary  to  ship.  They  recognize  no  specific  bounds  to   the  scope  of  their  role.  As  necessary,  they  recruit,  they  produce  buUons,  they   do  bizdev,  they  escalate,  they  hustle,  they  that  will  suffice.  
  • 70. Top  1%  Product  Manager   Understand  technical  trade-­‐offs     He  does  not  need  to  have  a  CS  degree.  They  do  need  to  be  able  to  roughly   understand  the  technical  complexity  of  the  features  they  put  on  the  backlog,   without  any  cosBng  input  from  devs.  They  should  partner  with  devs  to  make   the  right  technical  trade-­‐offs  (i.e.  compromise).    
  • 71. Top  1%  Product  Manager   Understand  technical  trade-­‐offs     He  does  not  need  to  have  a  CS  degree.  They  do  need  to  be  able  to  roughly   understand  the  technical  complexity  of  the  features  they  put  on  the  backlog,   without  any  cosBng  input  from  devs.  They  should  partner  with  devs  to  make   the  right  technical  trade-­‐offs  (i.e.  compromise).     Understand  good  design     He  doesn't  have  to  be  a  designer,  but  they  should  appreciate  great  design  and   be  able  to  disBnguish  it  from  good  design.  They  should  also  be  able  to   arBculate  the  difference  to  their  design  counterparts,  or  at  least  arBculate   direcBons  to  pursue  to  go  from  good  to  great.  
  • 72. Top  1%  Product  Manager   Understand  technical  trade-­‐offs     He  does  not  need  to  have  a  CS  degree.  They  do  need  to  be  able  to  roughly   understand  the  technical  complexity  of  the  features  they  put  on  the  backlog,   without  any  cosBng  input  from  devs.  They  should  partner  with  devs  to  make   the  right  technical  trade-­‐offs  (i.e.  compromise).     Understand  good  design     He  doesn't  have  to  be  a  designer,  but  they  should  appreciate  great  design  and   be  able  to  disBnguish  it  from  good  design.  They  should  also  be  able  to   arBculate  the  difference  to  their  design  counterparts,  or  at  least  arBculate   direcBons  to  pursue  to  go  from  good  to  great.     Write  effec)ve  copy     He  should  be  able  to  write  concise  copy  that  gets  the  job  done.  They  should   spend  Bme  and  energy  trying  to  find  the  perfect  words  for  buUon  labels,  nav,   calls-­‐to-­‐acBon,  etc.  
  • 73. Why  Product  Fail?  
  • 74. Why  some  products  don’t  do  too  well   §  Lack  of  Demand   §  Not  Living  Up  To  The  Hype   §  CommunicaBon     §  The  Cost  of  Switching     §  Support  System     §  ProhibiBvely  Strong  Branding   §  Timing     §  Target  Market   §  Fixing  What  Ain't  Broken  
  • 75. “I  don't  know  the  key  to  success,  but   the  key  to  failure  is  trying  to  please   everybody.”                                                                                            ~  Bill  Cosby  
  • 76. “You  have  to  make  every  single  detail   perfect.  And  you  have  to  limit  the   number  of  details.”                                                                                        ~  Jack  Dorsey  
  • 77. Minimum  Viable  Product   “A  minimum  viable  product  is  a  strategy  used   for  fast  and  quanBtaBve  market  tesBng  of  a   product  or  product  feature.       It  has  just  those  core  features  that  allow  the   product  to  be  deployed,  and  no  more.”      
  • 78. Thank  You  !  

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