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Exploiting context awareness and social interaction to provide help in large–scale environments
 

Exploiting context awareness and social interaction to provide help in large–scale environments

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This presentation was a part of the PhD public defense of Nasim Mahmud. Place Hasselt University, Expertise Center for Digital Media, Aula (Large Auditorium), Diepenbeek, Belgium on April 25, ...

This presentation was a part of the PhD public defense of Nasim Mahmud. Place Hasselt University, Expertise Center for Digital Media, Aula (Large Auditorium), Diepenbeek, Belgium on April 25, 2012.

PhD supervisors:
Promoter : Professor Dr. Karin Coninx
(Vice-dean, Hasselt University, Belgium)

Co-promoter: Professor Dr. Kris Luyten

Jury/Committee:

Prof. Dr. Frank Van Reeth (Chairperson, Hasselt University),
Prof. Dr. Karin Coninx (Advisor, Hasselt University),
Prof. Dr. Kris Luyten (Co-advisor, Hasselt University),
Prof. dr. Wim Lamotte (Doctoral committee member, Hasselt University),
Dr. Jan Van den Bergh (Hasselt University),
Prof. Dr. Yolande Berbers (Distrinet, University of Leuven),
Dr. Ann Ackaert (IBCN, Ghent University)

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    Exploiting context awareness and social interaction to provide help in large–scale environments Exploiting context awareness and social interaction to provide help in large–scale environments Presentation Transcript

    • Exploiting Context-awareness and Social Interactionto Provide Help in Large–scale Environments25 April 2012Nasim MahmudAdvisor: Prof. dr. Karin ConinxCo-advisor Prof. dr. Kris Luyten
    • Exploiting Context-awareness and Social Interactionto Provide Help in Large–scale Environments
    • Exploiting Context-awareness and Social Interactionto Provide Help in Large–scale Environments
    • Exploiting Context-awareness and Social Interactionto Provide Help in Large–scale Environments
    • Exploiting Context-awareness and Social Interactionto Provide Help in Large–scale Environments
    • Exploiting Context-awareness and Social Interactionto Provide Help in Large–scale Environments
    • Why Help?• Someone is unable to do what he wants to do• Someone needs some information• Someone needs guidance
    • Is this for…?On my way to San Sebastian, SpainNeed more and more precise information
    • In San Sebastian, SpainA person is browsing a mapOther people joined the searchNeed more reliable informationNeed more and more precise information
    • A menu along with a dictionaryNeed more interactive informationNeed more and more precise information
    • Motivation• People need fine-grained or interactiveinformation• Problems in asking someone for help:– Who is willing or eligible to provide help– People are often hesitant to ask strangers– Finding someone in the vicinity
    • RQs• How to find a suitable person who can help?• How to exchange contextual information?• How to select relevant contextual informationand potential groups of help providers?• How can persons with special need benefitfrom context-awareness and socialcomputing?• How can social and context-awarenessimprove data dissemination?
    • Goal
    • Goal
    • ContextWhat am Idoing?Who am Iwith?What ispossible?Where amI?What timeis it?How is theweather?How is the… ?
    • Social-contextWhat am Idoing?Who am Iwith?What ispossible?Where amI?What timeis it?How is theweather?How is the… ?Is available…Is willing to…Is knowledgeable…
    • Ubiquitous Help System (UHS)
    • Ubiquitous Help System (UHS)• People seek• Precise and fine-grained information• Often from other person(s)• From reliable source– It utilizes• External context (time, location)• Internal context (willingness, ability)• Social Network (FOAF)
    • Profiles and Preferences
    • HowExtract from my foaf profileExtract from other users’ foaf profileApplication logicMy preference Other users’ preferencesConstraints ConstraintsContextual variables
    • How does it work?? ?? ?…has a questionProfilematchedProfile andpreferencematchedReplyProfile andpreferencematched? ?? ?…has a questionProfilematchedReply
    • Client Structure
    • Query Structure
    • Distributed SearchSPARQL search
    • UHS Java Client
    • How to Exchange Information• How to exchange contextualinformation• How to exchange rich mediaWhat amI doing?Who am Iwith?What ispossible?Wheream I?Whattime is it?How is theweather?How isthe … ?Do you like this toy?
    • Who can help with the question?• A friend• A family member• A colleague• A familiar person
    • Related Work• Search by using social networksFacebook, Facebook questions, Quora, Twitter etc.• Mobile social Q&A• Photo-based question and answer }MobileSocialSearch
    • Photo-based question answerTom Yeh et al.(MM 2008)Community based
    • VizwizJeffrey P. Bigham et al. (UIST 2010)Crowdsourcing based
    • Limitations of existing solutions• Limited context-awareness• Lacking social awareness• Utilizes community and crowdsourcing– Not suitable for a range of personal questions– Not suitable where in-situ help is required– Not interactive enough
    • Ubiquitous Help System-Next (UHS-Next)
    • UHS-Next systemA mobile system that provides– Context-aware communication– Media rich communication– Usage of users’ personal social network
    • • Take a picture• Ask a question• Select a group• Select contextualinformation• Preview the question• Send
    • • Take a picture• Ask a question• Select a group• Select contextualinformation• Preview the question• Send
    • • Take a picture• Ask a question• Select a group• Select contextualinformation• Preview the question• Send
    • • Take a picture• Ask a question• Select a group• Select contextualinformation• Preview the question• Send
    • • Take a picture• Ask a question• Select a group• Select contextualinformation• Preview the question• Send
    • • Take a picture• Ask a question• Select a group• Select contextualinformation• Preview the question• Send
    • User Test
    • User Test 1: Finding HelpWhere are you?
    • What does it mean?
    • Results of User Test 1• UHS-Next is simple to use• Voice interaction for ‘spoken audio question’is needed• Inspiring result
    • User Test 2: Spontaneous Social Interaction• Free use of UHS-Next in real life by– Two users– One actor• For two days– In office environment– In daily life situations
    • Results of User Test 2• Other use than seeking help– Spontaneous social interaction– Sharing cognitive load– Sharing daily life experiences (Fun moment,“Whose office is this?”)• Easily embedded in daily life– Useful– Easy to use
    • Remaining Difficulties• Selecting right context• Selecting right group of usersTo solve these, we propose a mixed-initiativeapproach
    • Mixed-initiative Context Filteringand Group Selection Approach
    • • Our approach selects and prioritizes thecontextual data for a question, based onthe question content• Helps to select a group of potential helpproviders
    • Mixed-initiative Approach• Human internal context is subtle to measureby the available technologies• A fully automated system requires to know allthe variable about human-activity andexternal context• To reflect that the user’s requirements aresatisfied and make sure that the user is incontrol
    • Context Selection• A broad range (e.g., urgency, time, location, weatherconditions)• Which contextual information is important? (e.g.,time critical, quality critical)• How to capture that information? (e.g., urgency,location, reliability)• How to convey that information? (e.g., I am here(where ‘here’ is unknown to the user))
    • Ubiquitous Help System-Selection(UHS-Selection)
    • Asking question in a natural wayFrom Voice Question and from Sensors
    • Ubiquitous Help System for Context and GroupSelection (UHS-Selection)Main screen
    • Voice to Text conversion, user in the controlVoice to Text
    • Parsing the Text
    • Language Processing• Utilize the WordNet dictionary– A social network of words– Synonyms, meaning and relevance• Utilize Named Entity Recognition (NER)– Structure data in XML– Customized for the purpose
    • The UHS-Selection system sets priority to locationResult
    • Group Selection• Based on the context priority list (output fromthe context selection algorithm)• Current context (e.g., location, heading)• Current task• Next task
    • Group Selection: Visualization
    • Limitations and Workaround• Need to know more information about thepersons who can provide help (e.g., location)• Social translucence provides the balance(Erickson et al. (2000))
    • We have applied the framework in particularapplication domain, for Persons with Dementia(PwD)And in the dynamic social networkSimulated vehicular network
    • Sharing awareness information in specificcontext of use – Persons with Dementia
    • – In the early stage of dementia, they canlive their lives as usual, they can go:– Shopping,– Bird watching,– Jogging,– … …– When dementia syndrome progresses,they need more attention, and targetedhelp/ more social and navigational help
    • Dementia• Dementia is a term for a syndrome related tothe loss of cognitive functions• An acquired decline in memory and thinking(cognition) due to brain disease that results insignificant impairment of personal, social oroccupational function
    • General NeedsA person with dementia needs moreindependence in terms of :– Spatial– Temporal and– Socialawareness
    • As the dementia syndrome progresses• It becomes an important causeof dependencies• …Persons with dementia, areincreasingly dependent on theirsocial environment (likely to beless autonomous)• In most of the cases, in the earlyform of dementia the caregiver isa family member(Schulz et al. 2010)
    • Scenario(COMuICSer tool . Haesen, M. et al. 2009)
    • Ubiquitous Help System for Persons withDementia (UHSd)
    • Relation between the models used to developthe system : Part 1/3DialogmodelApplicationmodel
    • Relation between the models used to developthe system : Part 1/3DialogmodelApplicationmodel
    • Relation between the models used to developthe system Part 2/3DialogmodelApplicationmodel
    • Relation between the models used to developthe system Part 2/3DialogmodelApplicationmodel
    • Relation between the models used to developthe system Part 3/3DialogmodelApplicationmodel
    • System Overview of UHSd
    • One ExampleTo-do (Baker/Buy bread )– Time (From 10:00 to 11:00)– Location (Grote Markt Baker)– Associated contact (Jane, Ilsa, Mark )
    • Resulting System (UHSd)-Navigation Panel
    • Resulting System(UHSd)-Communication Panel
    • Summary of Ubiquitous Help System for Personswith Dementia (UHSd)• UHSd provides memory aid in terms of– Spatial– Temporal– Socialawareness• Provides context-aware support– Ensures (partly) gaining users autonomy– Ensures feeling of connectedness
    • Lessons Learned• We presented an interactive system andobserved that applications for people withdementia can be created by explicitly takingcontext into account in the design process• Three types of context variables involved inthe communication (Space, Time and SocialContext)
    • We have applied the framework in particularapplication domain, for Persons with Dementia(PwD)And in the dynamic social networkSimulated vehicular network
    • Geo-Social Interaction for Context-awareHelp in Large-scale Public Spaces
    • • We present– an approach, how to utilize social and spatio-temporal context to improve informationdissemination– Geo-social relevance with a ‘Dynamic viewapproach’– Evaluated using a simulation with real life car data
    • People who are `on-the-move often do not have anopportunity to spend long time looking for what they needMotivation
    • Social-components• Person in the network• Person with matched profile• Person with matched preferences, help type, urgency
    • Geo-components• User’s location• Distance between users (Help seeker and Helpprovider)• Direction of movement
    • Finding Balance (in geo-social components)
    • Friends• Friendship is ‘asymmetric’ relation (like Twitter)• Dynamically updating list
    • Help Type Matching (asymmetric)
    • Validation ( by Simulation in KULeuven)• Using realistic dataset for cars• In area of 250 km by 260 km• Logged simulation data for 24 hoursSocializing Cars Vehicular Network
    • ConclusionImproved relevance back propagation technique for routingmessages in the network shows better results for each evaluatedparameter
    • Conclusion
    • Lessons Learned from Dynamic Social Network• Social networking capabilities and spatio-temporal context information significantlyimproves purposeful interaction betweenindividuals• It improves in terms of both the efficiency ofthe network data dissemination and thequality of the delivered information
    • Conclusion
    • Contributions• We have developed number of context-awaresocial computing systems• We have evaluated the systems• We have studied dynamic social networksystems
    • Context-aware Social Computing Systems
    • ‘Aware’ Interaction
    • Future research directions• An evaluation framework for context-awareand social computing system• Emergency response• Assistive Technology
    • Thank youhttp://research.edm.uhasselt.be/~nmahmud/