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Mis presentation
Mis presentation
Mis presentation
Mis presentation
Mis presentation
Mis presentation
Mis presentation
Mis presentation
Mis presentation
Mis presentation
Mis presentation
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Mis presentation

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  • 1. 2.1 © 2007 by Prentice Hall Systems from a functional perspectiveSales and marketing systemsManufacturing and production systemsFinance and accounting systemsHuman resources systemsTypes of Business Information SystemsManagement Information SystemsManagement Information SystemsChapter 2 Global E-Business: How Businesses Use Information SystemsChapter 2 Global E-Business: How Businesses Use Information Systems
  • 2. 2.2 © 2007 by Prentice Hall Sales and marketing systemsFunctional concerns include:○ Sales management, customer identificationmarket research, advertising and promotion,pricing, new productsExamples of systems:○ Order processing (operational level)○ Pricing analysis (middle mgmt)○ Sales trend forecasting (senior mgmt)Types of Business Information SystemsManagement Information SystemsManagement Information SystemsChapter 2 Global E-Business: How Businesses Use Information SystemsChapter 2 Global E-Business: How Businesses Use Information Systems
  • 3. 2.3 © 2007 by Prentice HallExample of a Sales Information SystemExample of a Sales Information SystemFigure 2-2This system captures sales data at the moment the sale takes place to help the business monitor salestransactions and to provide information to help management analyze sales trends and the effectivenessof marketing campaigns.Types of Business Information SystemsManagement Information SystemsManagement Information SystemsChapter 2 Global E-Business: How Businesses Use Information SystemsChapter 2 Global E-Business: How Businesses Use Information Systems
  • 4. 2.4 © 2007 by Prentice Hall Manufacturing and production systemsFunctional concerns include:○ Managing production facilities, production goals,production materials, and schedulingExamples of systems:○ Machine control (operational mgmt)○ Production planning (middle mgmt)○ Facilities location (senior mgmt)Types of Business Information SystemsManagement Information SystemsManagement Information SystemsChapter 2 Global E-Business: How Businesses Use Information SystemsChapter 2 Global E-Business: How Businesses Use Information Systems
  • 5. 2.5 © 2007 by Prentice HallOverview of an Inventory SystemOverview of an Inventory SystemFigure 2-3This system provides information about the number of items available in inventory tosupport manufacturing and production activities.Types of Business Information SystemsManagement Information SystemsManagement Information SystemsChapter 2 Global E-Business: How Businesses Use Information SystemsChapter 2 Global E-Business: How Businesses Use Information Systems
  • 6. 2.6 © 2007 by Prentice Hall Finance and accounting systemsFunctional concerns include:○ Managing financial assets (cash, stocks, etc.)and capitalization of firm, and managing firm’sfinancial recordsExamples of systems:○ Accounts receivable (operational mgmt)○ Budgeting (middle mgmt)○ Profit planning (senior mgmt)Types of Business Information SystemsManagement Information SystemsManagement Information SystemsChapter 2 Global E-Business: How Businesses Use Information SystemsChapter 2 Global E-Business: How Businesses Use Information Systems
  • 7. 2.7 © 2007 by Prentice HallAn Accounts Receivable SystemAn Accounts Receivable SystemFigure 2-4An accounts receivable system tracks and stores important customer data, such as payment history,credit rating, and billing history.Types of Business Information SystemsManagement Information SystemsManagement Information SystemsChapter 2 Global E-Business: How Businesses Use Information SystemsChapter 2 Global E-Business: How Businesses Use Information Systems
  • 8. 2.8 © 2007 by Prentice Hall Human resource systemsFunctional concerns include:○ Identifying potential employees, maintainingemployee records, creating programs to developemployee talent and skillsExamples of systems:○ Training and development (operational mgmt)○ Compensation analysis (middle mgmt)○ Human resources planning (senior mgmt)Types of Business Information SystemsManagement Information SystemsManagement Information SystemsChapter 2 Global E-Business: How Businesses Use Information SystemsChapter 2 Global E-Business: How Businesses Use Information Systems
  • 9. 2.9 © 2007 by Prentice HallAn Employee Record Keeping SystemAn Employee Record Keeping SystemFigure 2-5This system maintains data on the firm’s employees to support the human resources function.Types of Business Information SystemsManagement Information SystemsManagement Information SystemsChapter 2 Global E-Business: How Businesses Use Information SystemsChapter 2 Global E-Business: How Businesses Use Information Systems
  • 10. 2.10 © 2007 by Prentice Hall Management information systemsServe middle managementProvide reports on firm’s current performance,based on data from TPSProvide answers to routine questions withpredefined procedure for answering themTypically have little analytic capabilityTypes of Business Information SystemsManagement Information SystemsManagement Information SystemsChapter 2 Global E-Business: How Businesses Use Information SystemsChapter 2 Global E-Business: How Businesses Use Information Systems
  • 11. 2.11 © 2007 by Prentice HallHow Management Information Systems Obtain theirHow Management Information Systems Obtain theirData from the Organization’s TPSData from the Organization’s TPSFigure 2-6In the system illustrated by this diagram, three TPS supply summarized transaction data to the MISreporting system at the end of the time period. Managers gain access to the organizational data throughthe MIS, which provides them with the appropriate reports.Types of Business Information SystemsManagement Information SystemsManagement Information SystemsChapter 2 Global E-Business: How Businesses Use Information SystemsChapter 2 Global E-Business: How Businesses Use Information Systems

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