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Memory Retriever
Memory Retriever
Memory Retriever
Memory Retriever
Memory Retriever
Memory Retriever
Memory Retriever
Memory Retriever
Memory Retriever
Memory Retriever
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Memory Retriever

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  • 1. HC
177:
Biotech
&
Art
 Memory
Retriever
 Jackie
Bucher
 Biology


  • 2. Abstract
 •  Through
the
creation
of
a
memory
storage
device,
the
 American
public
will
have
a
technological
cure
to
 diseases
such
as
Alzheimer's.
The
electrical
impulses
 transported
by
the
optic
nerve
will
be
stored
within
the
 body
and
a
remote
will
be
installed
in
the
arm
so
that
 the
user
can
simply
rewind
to
a
certain
day
and
time
 and
the
electrical
impulses
will
be
reintroduced
into
 the
nerve
and
sent
to
the
brain
to
be
processed
as
 images.
Alzheimer's
patients
will
be
comforted
with
 their
memories
once
again
and
every
other
citizen
will
 never
misplace
an
item.
The
intent
is
to
not
to
cure
 memory
loss
but
to
invent
a
system
of
memory
 retrieval.

  • 3. Concept
 •  I
designed
the
memory
retrieval
device
for
multiple
reasons.
The
 first
and
foremost
for
Alzheimer’s
patients
that
suffer
from
constant
 memory
loss.
Secondly
the
device
can
be
used
in
everyday
life
to
 help
one
remember.
The
device
can
also
be
utilized
in
a
larger
social
 context
in
the
court
system.
The
memories
stored
in
the
device
can
 be
downloaded
and
visualized
on
media
players
and
used
to
convict
 criminals.
Essentially
no
one
will
be
able
to
lie
without
being
 caught,
because
any
crime
will
be
seen
through
the
eyes
of
the
 criminal.
Another
use
of
this
device
would
be
to
spread
awareness
 and
as
an
educational
tool.
The
data
will
be
made
available
to
the
 internet
by
the
will
of
the
owner.
With
this
aspect,
memories
can
be
 used
in
the
classroom
with
first
hand
documentation
of
historic
 incidents.
Memory
libraries
would
be
the
central
source
of
 information
and
made
available
to
the
public.



  • 4. Context
&
Precedents
 •  Alzheimer’s
disease
(AD)
is
a
neurodegenerative
disorder
that
affects
one
 out
of
every
eight
individuals
over
the
age
of
65
(1).
The
exact
causes
are
 unknown
but
the
disease
is
linked
to
the
build
up
of
amyloid
beta
protein
 as
plaques
and
tau
protein
as
tangles
in
the
brain.
AD
ultimately
leads
to
a
 disruption
of
reasoning,
language,
planning
and
perception
(2).

 •  Another
commonly
used
term
that
is
associated
with
memory
loss
is
 dementia.
Dementia
is
not
a
particular
disease
but
instead
a
classification
 of
symptoms
that
are
associated
with
neurodegeneration.
Lewy
body
 disease,
strokes,
Parkinson’s
disease,
Multiple
sclerosis,
and
Huntington’s
 disease
are
all
leading
causes
of
dementia
(3).
 •  Those
who
suffer
from
amnesia
would
also
benefit
from
the
memory
 retriever.
Amnesia
is
a
memory
loss
that
is
caused
by
either
physical
injury
 to
the
brain,
ingestion
of
a
toxic
substance
that
targets
the
brain,
or
a
 traumatic
or
emotional
event
(4).






  • 5. Project
Proposal
 •  The
memory
retriever
will
 consist
of
a
small
wire
that
 intersects
the
optic
nerve
and
 stores
all
electrical
impulses
in
 the
forearm.
The
impulses
will
 be
available
to
be
exported
by
 conversion
to
visual
images.
 The
device
must
act
as
the
 brain
to
organize
the
visual
 stimuli
into
an
actual
image.
 They
will
also
be
available
to
 be
reintroduced
into
the
optic
 nerve
and
continue
their
 journey
to
the
visual
cortex
 where
they
are
processed
as
 memories.


  • 6. Proposal
Continued
 •  Each
person
will
have
control
of
their
own
 memories
through
a
handless
visual
 processor
surgically
implanted
on
the
arm
 with
the
basic
functions
of
a
DVD
player
 (stop,
play,
rewind,
pause,
etc.)
In
order
to
 replay
one’s
own
memories
the
subject
 would
have
to
close
his
or
her
eyes,
so
that
 there
is
no
loss
or
overwriting
by
the
device

  • 7. Conclusion
 •  With
the
memory
retrieval
device,
the
three
“sins
of
 omission”
that
memory
researcher,
Daniel
Schacter
 describe
as
transience
(loss
of
memory
over
time),
absent
 mindedness
(lapse
of
attention),
and
blocking
(momentary
 inaccessability
of
stored
information)
will
all
be
cured
(5).
 This
device
will
be
most
useful
in
the
near
future
as
the
 baby
boom
generation
enters
their
late
60’s
and
70’s.
It
has
 been
projected
that
as
many
as
10
million
Americans
will
 suffer
from
Alzheimer’s
by
2050
(6).
Focusing
on
increasong
 ones
life
expectancy
is
inefficient
with
such
high
rates
of
 dementia
in
the
elderly
population.
Not
only
will
the
 memory
retriever
come
of
use
to
those
most
in
need,
but
 will
also
revolutionize
our
judicial
and
education
 institutions.


  • 8. References
 1
Howard
Crystal,
“Alzheimer’s
Disease.”
MedecineNet.
11
Feb.
2010
http:// www.medicinenet.com/alzheimers_disease/article.htm
 2
Carrie
Hill,
“What
Causes
Alzheimer’s
Disease.”
About.com.
3
March
2009.
11
Feb.
 2010
http://alzheimers.about.com/od/whatisalzheimer1/a/causes.htm
 3
“Dementia.”A.D.A.M.
2010.
11
Feb.
2010.
https://health.google.com/health/ref/ Dementia
 4
John
L.
Miller,
“Amnesia.”
AtHealth.
30
Dec.
2009.
11
Feb.
2010
http:// www.athealth.com/consumer/Disorders/Amnesia.html

 5
Bridget
Murray,
“The
Seven
Sins
of
Memory.”
American
Psychological
Association.
 2010.
11
Feb.
2010
http://www.apa.org/monitor/oct03/sins.aspx




 6
“Alzheimer’s
Affects
a
Growing
Elderly
Population.”Fisher
Center
for
Alzheimer’s
 Research
Foundation.
12
Feb.
2007.
11
Feb
2010
http://www.alzinfo.org/ newsarticle/templates/newstemplate.asp?articleid=212&zoneid=1

  • 9. Bibliography/Links

 
“Alzheimer’s
Affects
a
Growing
Elderly
Population.”Fisher
Center
for
Alzheimer’s
Research
Foundation.
 12
Feb.
2007.
11
Feb
2010
http://www.alzinfo.org/newsarticle/templates/newstemplate.asp? articleid=212&zoneid=1
 Bridget
Murray,
“The
Seven
Sins
of
Memory.”
American
Psychological
Association.
2010.
11
Feb.
2010
 http://www.apa.org/monitor/oct03/sins.aspx
 Carrie
Hill,
“What
Causes
Alzheimer’s
Disease.”
About.com.
3
March
2009.
11
Feb.
2010
http:// alzheimers.about.com/od/whatisalzheimer1/a/causes.htm




 “Dementia.”A.D.A.M.
2010.
11
Feb.
2010.
https://health.google.com/health/ref/Dementia
 Deborah,
“Aussie
Artist
Implants
Thirs
Ear
in
His
Own
Arm.”
14
Oct.
2007.
11
Feb
2010
http:// images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.lifeinthefastlane.ca/wp‐content/uploads/2007/10/
 
Howard
Crystal,
“Alzheimer’s
Disease.”
MedecineNet.
11
Feb.
2010
http://www.medicinenet.com/ alzheimers_disease/article.htm
 
John
L.
Miller,
“Amnesia.”
AtHealth.
30
Dec.
2009.
11
Feb.
2010
http://www.athealth.com/consumer/ Disorders/Amnesia.html
 
“The
Woman
who
can
remember
everything.”
09
May
2008.
11
Feb.
2010.
http:// www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/howaboutthat/1940420/The‐woman‐who‐can‐remember‐ everything.html
 www.aph.org/cvi/
images/brain_2.jpg
 http://rlv.zcache.com/play_pause_stop_rewind_bumper_sticker‐p128464525275020826trl0_400.jpg


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