Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Mun Training
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Mun Training

1,972

Published on

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,972
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
105
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. TISMUN LEAGUE Delegate Training 2013 DPS Noida MUN Club Estd. 2004 Recognised 2008
  • 2. Objectives  Introducing an MUN Conference terminologies rules and procedures documents involved and their formats resolution writing handling emergencies lobbying tactics OBJECTIVES
  • 3. Introduction United Nations INTRODUCTION
  • 4. Introduction  Model United Nations INTRODUCTION
  • 5.  Principal Goal of Participating in MUN: to get a better understanding of the different problems in the world today and develop and debate on solutions to these problems.  Participants take up the roles as diplomats and participate in a simulation of a body of the UN system.  Participants get to know different countries‟ situations in an issue.  They discuss with an ultimate goal of international cooperation.  The product of the discussion is the resolution. IntroductionINTRODUCTION
  • 6. Delegates  Representatives of member states  Delegates converse in Formal Speech TerminologyTERMINOLOGY
  • 7. Terminology Placard  A card which shows the name of the country TERMINOLOGY
  • 8. Dais Table Chairperson Vice-chairperson Rapporteur TerminologyTERMINOLOGY
  • 9. Facilitators/Conference Staff passing notes facilitate communication TerminologyTERMINOLOGY
  • 10. Terminology Points  Point of Personal Privilege  Point of Parliamentary Procedure or Point of Inquiry  Point of Order  Point of Information TERMINOLOGY
  • 11. TERMINOLOGY  Point of Order : Points of order are used when delegates believe the chair has made an error in the running of the committee. Delegates rising to points of order may not speak on the substance of the matter under discussion. They should only specify the errors they believe were made in the formal committee procedure.  Point of Parliamentary Procedure or Point of Inquiry: When the floor is open (i.e., no other delegate is speaking), a delegate may rise to a point of inquiry in order to ask the chairperson a question regarding the rules of procedure.  Point of Personal Privilege: Points of personal privilege are used to inform the chairperson of a physical discomfort a delegate is experiencing, such as the inability to hear another delegate‟s speech.  Point of Information: After a delegate has given a speech in formal debate, he or she may yield time to points of information, or questions from other delegates concerning the speech.
  • 12. Motions: Can only be entertained when the floor is open. TERMINOLOGY Motion To: • Suspend the Meeting – for the purpose of caucus • Adjourn Meeting – ending session until next session (lunch etc.) • Table Debate – suspend debate (can be resumed later) • Close Debate – end debate to move for voting (cannot be resumed later) • Appeal the Chair’s Decision
  • 13. Document 4 documents usually found in MUN  Position paper  Working paper  Draft resolution  Resolution DOCUMENTS
  • 14.  Position paper: a document describing the current situation of a country regarding the issue and the country‟s stance. DocumentDOCUMENTS Standard Marking Scheme: (Out of 10) 1. Format: 2 (1. Font Arial, Size 12, Single side A4, Formal Language) 2. Intro: 1 (-> Definition -> History) 3. Content: 2 (Present situation, past action (both UN and country), quotes, treaties, laws, facts and figures) 4. Appeal: 2 (Overall Impact) 5. Solutions: 3 (Innovative solutions which are practical as well will be marked higher) * Bonus mark for UN definitions.
  • 15. DOCUMENTS Working paper: A document supported by 1/10 of delegations as signatories. The document addresses several issues that need to be dealt with in the topic and highlight ideas and possible solutions.
  • 16.  Draft Resolution: a document that addresses the solutions to the problem and measures to be taken by a Model UN committee. If it is passed by the committee, the draft resolution will become the resolution. Only 1 resolution can be passed for each topic. Must be passed with simple majority to become the resolution. Every point must start with an operative clause. Each section is subject to amendments (simple majority) DocumentDOCUMENTS
  • 17. DOCUMENTS Tips for Resolution Writing: •Be sure to follow the format for resolutions provided by the conference organizers. Each conference may have a slightly different format. •Create a detailed resolution. For example, if your resolution calls for a new program, think about how it will be funded and what body will manage it. •Try to cite facts whenever possible. •Be realistic. Do not create objectives for your resolution that cannot be met. Make sure your body can take the action suggested. For example, the General Assembly can‟t sanction another country – only the Security Council can do so. •Try to find multiple sponsors. Your committee will be more likely to approve the resolutions if many delegates contribute ideas. •Preambulatory clauses are historic justifications for action. Use them to cite past resolutions, precedents and statements about the purpose of action. •Operative clauses are policies that the resolution is designed to create. Use them to explain what the committee will do to address the issue.
  • 18. TERMINOLOGY •Preambulatory Clauses The preamble of a draft resolution states the reasons for which the committee is addressing the topic and highlights past international action on the issue. Each clause begins with a present participle (called a preambulatory phrase) and ends with a comma. Preambulatory clauses can include: References to the UN Charter; Citations of past UN resolutions or treaties on the topic under discussion; Mentions of statements made by the Secretary-General or a relevant UN body or agency; Recognition of the efforts of regional or nongovernmental organizations in dealing with the issue; and General statements on the topic, its significance and its impact. •Operative Clauses Operative clauses identify the actions or recommendations made in a resolution. Each operative clause begins with a verb (called an operative phrase) and ends with a semicolon. Operative clauses should be organized in a logical progression, with each containing a single idea or proposal, and are always numbered. If a clause requires further explanation, bulleted lists set off by letters or roman numerals can also be used. After the last operative clause, the resolution ends in a period.
  • 19. Heading Address the General Assembly Preambulary Clauses Operative Clauses
  • 20. END Voting Draft Resolution & Debate Discussion Agenda setting Flow of Debate
  • 21. Flow of Debate -> Roll Call -> Present -> Present and Voting
  • 22. Agenda Setting Discussion Draft resolution & Debate Voting 1st step  Agenda Setting
  • 23. Agenda setting:  Delegates are given 2 topics for each committee and due to limitation of time, delegates vote on the topic they prefer to talk about first. *Reminder: you are supposed to prepare for both!  The floor is first open, allowing “motions” to set the agenda. *Reminder: don’t speak before the Chair addresses you by your country name! Agenda Setting Discussion Draft resolution & Debate Voting
  • 24. Motion to put topic area A FIRST in agenda Provisional Speakers‟ List •At least 2 pairs must speak •F  A  F A… Closure of Debate •Motion of closure of debate can be raised •2 speakers opposing the motion (closure of debate), •2/3 majority to pass VOTING •> ½ to PASS •If does not PASS  the other topic automatically becomes the first Agenda Setting Discussion Draft resolution & Debate Voting
  • 25. Agenda Setting Discussion Draft resolution & Debate Voting  A delegate raises a motion “to put topic area A/B first on the agenda”  A „Provisional‟ speakers‟ list will then be drawn.  Delegates may raise your placard to add your countries‟ name on the list, either speaking for or against the motion.
  • 26. Delegates speak in the order: China USA Iraq Brazil … no yielding 1 min per speech Provisional Speakers’ List For Against China USA Iraq Brazil Agenda Setting Discussion Draft resolution & Debate Voting
  • 27. Finally, delegates will vote on the motion (to put topic area A..). It only requires a simple majority to pass. If the motion fails, another topic will automatically be put first on the agenda. Agenda Setting Discussion Draft resolution & Debate Voting
  • 28. Agenda Setting Discussion Draft resolution & Debate Voting e.g. Motion to put topic area A – orphan Crisis on the 1st of the agenda Yes No 1 4 Then topic area B will automatically become the 1st topic on the agenda without further discussion.
  • 29. 2nd step  Discussion Agenda Setting Discussion Draft resolution & Debate Voting
  • 30. Agenda Setting Discussion Draft resolution & Debate Voting General Speakers’ List USA China Brazil Iraq DPRK … …  Delegates can speak according to the order on the general speakers’ list. General Speakers’ List
  • 31. The general speakers’ list is drawn after the agenda is set. Delegates can add their countries’ name on the list by: 1. Raising placard on the chair’s request 2. Sending a note to dais Agenda Setting Discussion Draft resolution & Debate Voting General Speakers’ List USA China Brazil Iraq DPRK … … General Speakers’ List
  • 32. Agenda Setting Discussion Draft resolution & Debate Voting 1 min. per speech which can be changed during the course of discussion Yielding General Speakers’ List USA China Brazil Iraq DPRK … … General Speakers’ List
  • 33. Terminology Yielding Each speaker has a limited speaking time. Yielding occurs when the speakers do not utilize all their speaking time. Yield to the executive board Yield to Points of Information Yield to comment P.S.Executive Board can ask you questions anytime they want. TERMINOLOGY
  • 34. Agenda Setting Discussion Draft resolution & Debate Voting The floor is open between 2 speakers. Delegates can raise any points or motions. General Speakers’ List USA China Brazil Iraq DPRK … … General Speakers’ List
  • 35. Agenda Setting Discussion Draft resolution & Debate Voting The purpose of a moderated caucus is to facilitate the debate on a particular area. Delegates can motion to have a moderated caucus when the floor is open between each speaker. Purpose Duration Speaking time per speech Moderated Caucus General Speakers’ List USA China Brazil Iraq DPRK … …
  • 36. Agenda Setting Discussion Draft resolution & Debate Voting When the chair receives a motion to have a moderated caucus, the committee will vote on this motion. It requires a simple majority to pass. Moderated Caucus General Speakers’ List USA China Brazil Iraq DPRK … …
  • 37. Agenda Setting Discussion Draft resolution & Debate Voting Moderated Caucus After the motion passes, the general speakers’ list will be temporarily suspended. The chair will recognize delegates who raise their placard to speak. Generally the speaker who proposes the Caucus is given the first chance to speak. General Speakers’ List USA China Brazil Iraq DPRK … …
  • 38. Agenda Setting Discussion Draft resolution & Debate Voting Moderated Caucus The moderated caucus will end when its duration proposed by the delegate exhausts. The general speakers’ list will resume. General Speakers’ List USA China Brazil Iraq DPRK … …
  • 39. Agenda Setting Discussion Draft resolution & Debate Voting Delegates may also raise a motion to have an unmoderated caucus when the floor is open. Delegates may discuss a specific area in an unmoderated caucus. Unmoderated Caucus General Speakers’ List USA China Brazil Iraq DPRK … …
  • 40. Agenda Setting Discussion Draft resolution & Debate Voting Unmoderated Caucus A motion to have an unmoderated caucus requires a simple majority to pass Delegates may walk around the chamber freely during an unmoderated caucus General Speakers’ List USA China Brazil Iraq DPRK … …
  • 41. Agenda Setting Discussion Draft resolution & Debate Voting Unmoderated Caucus It is in an Unmoderated Caucus that delegates should formulate working papers/draft resolutions and also work towards forming „blocs‟. The general speakers’ list will resume when the time of an unmoderated caucus exhausts. General Speakers’ List USA China Brazil Iraq DPRK … …
  • 42. Agenda Setting Discussion Draft resolution & Debate Voting Delegates may send notes to anybody in the chamber at any time Facilitators will help you transfer the note paper. Use of notes
  • 43. Agenda Setting Discussion Draft resolution & Debate Voting Tips for effective caucusing: •Enter the caucus with a plan in mind: Formulate ideas on what your country would like to see included in a resolution. Decide which clauses you are willing to negotiate on and which you are not. •Find delegates in your regional bloc: This is the easiest way to seek out allies. However, if you find that the group you are working with is not meeting your needs, do not be afraid to switch groups. •Provide ideas: Tell others what your country is hoping to achieve. If you do not agree with an idea, do not hesitate to say that it is against your country‟s policy. •Negotiate: While it is often necessary to give up something that you want, make sure that you are not giving up anything too important. •Listen: By listening to what others are saying you will able to build on other people‟s ideas and add more to the discussion. Listening also shows respect for each delegate in your group.
  • 44. Agenda Setting Discussion Draft resolution & Debate Voting Tips for effective caucusing: •Do not interrupt: Allow other delegates to finish their thoughts rather than interrupting others in the middle of a sentence. It sometimes helps to write down your idea so that you can bring it up when the delegate is finished speaking. •Record ideas: Start to formulate a resolution in writing. Rather than waiting until the last minute, begin recording fellow delegates‟ ideas right away. •Be resourceful: By providing fellow delegates with resolution text, maps or information as they need it, you will show that you are valuable to the group. •Have one-on-one conversations: Speaking with an individual or in a small group is the best way to find out a delegate‟s position on an issue. Larger groups are better suited to brainstorming. •Stay calm: In caucuses, delegates can sometimes “lose their cool.” Staying calm will not only help your group be more effective, but will be noticed by the conference staff. Always keep your voice at a normal level. If you see that you are becoming upset or raising your voice, excuse yourself from the group for a few minutes.
  • 45. Agenda Setting Discussion Draft resolution & Debate Voting Tips for effective caucusing: •Use time effectively: Make sure you have enough time to hear everyone‟s ideas so that you can discuss them during formal debate. Try not to waste time arguing over small details that do not seriously affect the draft resolution. •Show respect: Never give orders or tell other delegates what they should or should not do. Be polite and treat all your fellow delegates with respect. •Provide constructive critique: Rather than negatively criticizing another delegate, focus on providing constructive critique. If you dislike an idea, try to offer an alternative. Critique ideas, not people. •Establish connections with other delegates: Although it can be tempting to call a fellow delegate “Pakistan,” “Brazil” or “Sweden”, you can form a better connection with a delegate by learning his or her name and where he or she comes from. Ask the delegate about his or her ideas and impressions of the debate. Showing interest in your fellow delegates at the beginning of the conference will help you gain more support later on and can help you to form lasting friendships.
  • 46. 3rd step  Draft resolution & debate Agenda Setting Discussion Draft resolution & Debate Voting
  • 47. Agenda Setting Discussion Draft resolution & Debate Voting When the discussion goes on and many solutions and much opinion has already thrown out, some delegates may start writing their draft resolutions.
  • 48.  Signatories: 1/3 of the committee  Approved by Chairperson, then distributed to other delegations  Given an order number (e.g. DR 1.1, 1.2, etc.)  Amendment by any country  introduce  vote Agenda Setting Discussion Draft resolution & Debate Voting
  • 49. TERMINOLOGY •Sponsors of a draft resolution are the principal authors of the document and agree with its substance. Although it is possible to have only one sponsor, this rarely occurs at the UN, since countries must work together to create widely agreeable language in order for the draft resolution to pass. Sponsors control a draft resolution and only the sponsors can approve immediate changes. •Signatories are countries that may or may not agree with the substance of the draft resolution but still wish to see it debated so that they can propose amendments.
  • 50. TERMINOLOGY •A friendly amendment is a change to the draft resolution that all sponsors agree with. After the amendment is signed by all of the draft resolution‟s sponsors and approved by the committee director or president, it will be automatically incorporated into the resolution. •An unfriendly amendment is a change that some or all of the draft resolution‟s sponsors do not support and must be voted upon by the committee. The author(s) of the amendment will need to obtain a required number of signatories in order to introduce it (usually 20 percent of the committee). Prior to voting on the draft resolution, the committee votes on all unfriendly amendments.
  • 51. Agenda Setting Discussion Draft resolution & Debate Voting 4th step  Voting
  • 52. Agenda Setting Discussion Draft resolution & Debate Voting Types of vote Substantive vote Procedural vote Roll call vote
  • 53. Agenda Setting Discussion Draft resolution & Debate Voting Substantive vote : passing draft resolution  simple majority
  • 54. Agenda Setting Discussion Draft resolution & Debate Voting Procedural vote: Closure of debate  2/3 majority All other votes (e.g. pass a motion of agenda setting, motion to introduce working paper…)  simple majority
  • 55. Agenda Setting Discussion Draft resolution & Debate Voting Roll Call voting:  passing Draft Resolution  yes  No  yes/no with rights  Pass  abstain
  • 56. Q & A session
  • 57. Research Guidelines
  • 58. Committee & Topics  Starting with official website Body’s History Purpose Function & Position UN system Important Decisions
  • 59. Committee & Topics  Topics Research Past Resolution NGO’s Actions & Reports Blocs Studies Current Affairs
  • 60. Two Kinds of Information  Objective – General Idea and Facts  CIA world factbook  Subjective – Detailed Study  Wikipedia
  • 61. Research Directions  Research Your Country’s  Past Actions  Views on the topic  Proposals it supports and DOES NOT support
  • 62. ALSO Research  Potential Allies  Potential Enemies (People you disagree with)
  • 63. DO NOT  DO NOT GET TOO SPECIFIC  There is no need to know incredibly specific numbers or facts  DO NOT CONFUSE OBJECTIVE VERSUS RESEARCH  Who are you quoting what’s their view
  • 64. EMERGENCY  Importance  How to cope with it?
  • 65. LOBBYING  Importance  Lobbying yourself to GLORY :D
  • 66. TACTICS General Speakers‟ List (GSL) tips: 1. Put in effect all your public speaking knowledge. (Mirror practice, bla bla) 2. First speech: a. History of topic b. How is your country linked to the topic c. Steps your country/UN/regional bloc has taken d. Steps your country supports/opposes e. Possible measures and suggestions f. Is your country ready to negotiate if its directly linked g. Role of NGO‟s etc. 3. If you haven‟t got an early chance on the GSL change your speech. a. Speak in context to current discussion b. Encourage collaboration/Ask for support for the ideas that have been brought up and those you support c. Reference what other delegates have said. d. Support/Oppose other delegates e. Present ideas for draft resolutions f. Explain why your country does not agree with a specific point
  • 67. The following Section is UNRATED
  • 68. TACTICS :P Things you shouldn’t do at a MUN conference: 1. DO NOT let down your formal guard EVER no matter how comfortable you feel. 2. DO NOT use personal pronouns. 3. DO NOT challenge your chair unless you can back it up or show attitude towards the executive board. 4. DO NOT stand on chairs or tables irrespective of how vertically challenged you are. There are always more subtle ways to gain attention. 5. DO NOT get too involved with the IP or other delegates for unprofessional reasons. 6. DO NOT make any unnecessary comments about fellow delegates, executive board or the conference. 7. DO NOT hurl abuses or get into physical fights with anyone. 8. DO NOT ever try to fake a fact when your chair's onto you. 9. DO NOT irritate your chair. Be amusing but not irritating.
  • 69. TACTICS :P TISMUN– Backhand Way. *Evil Grin* 1. Procedural Involvement gets you brownie points. 2. Make sure you have something to say every minute even if you just want to add that you think the previous delegate made an important/useless point. (Preferably for small committees and DO NOT over do it) 3. Make sure you know when the lunch and tea breaks are and make those motions at the right time. (Nothing infuriates an Exec Board more than someone raising a caucus at lunch) 4. Backup every allegation with undeniable proof (UN, State Docs and Reuters). 5. Leave your ethics and morals at the table during Unmods. However, do not be rowdy or abusive. If you have to backstab to win, don‟t think twice but remember the most effective weapon is subtlety. 6. Try and test the preferences of your Executive board. See what they like Facts, Allegations, Morality etc. But do not overdo them. 7. Try and get into the groove of your country. E.g. if you are the USA, then humility won‟t do you much good.
  • 70. TACTICS :P TISMUN– Backhand Way. *Evil Grin* 8. Get stuff that most people wouldn‟t get or even think about. Random facts, funny facts, astounding numbers etc. (Associated Researching) 9. Think before hand about Mod Caucuses and initiate as many as you can. 10.Speak, speak and speak specially in Mods. 11.When you are exercising control over a group, always make sure you appear to be doing it through mutual consent. 12.Summarize everything if you are the near the last speaker on the Mod caucus. Also summarize your speech at the end of your turn on the GSL. 13.ALWAYS yield to Points of Information. 14.Emergency/Crisis – The Jackpot. 15.Make full use of notes/chits. (for all purposes :P) 16.Be manipulative. Learn to cook up believable facts. 17.Don‟t be afraid to take on the IP/WP :D But don‟t get on the wrong side of the Exec board. 18.Make full use of free food :P 19.You can also make use of the „networking‟ possibilities. (Optional) Most of all go there to enjoy yourself. If you think tooooooooooooo much about winning, chances are you‟ll miss the fun and the prize.
  • 71. END

×