Thinking outside the audio tour box: Nancy Proctor  Smithsonian American Art Museum Using front-end and formative evaluati...
 
Fraunhofer Institute, Kunstmuseum Bonn:  ‘Beat Zoderer’ exhibition (Listen project) 2003 Fraunhofer Institute, Kunstmuseum...
Thinking outside the audiotour box Means thinking about content & experience
Recent Research & Resources http://wiki.MuseumMobile.info/research <ul><li>2009 </li></ul><ul><li>CHNM survey on Museums a...
Who is your target audience? <ul><li>Tied to mission & key messages </li></ul><ul><li>What are the desired outcomes? What ...
A Minority of Visitors Use Technologies in the Galleries 2006 study by Randi Korn & Associates at SFMOMA BUT  they use tec...
Question mapping in the gallery: What do they want to know? <ul><li>Semi-structured interviews </li></ul><ul><li>FAQs and ...
Collecting questions… <ul><li>Online question collection:  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Specialized Q&A services, e.g. AJOA </li>...
Organize & Filter <ul><li>Group questions: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Thematically </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>By object </li></...
Organize questions Painting Sculpture Folk Art Architecture Dramatic change in style in display Why multiples of same work...
Which content modalities? <ul><li>+ - + - + - + - +  Soundtracks </li></ul><ul><li>o  o  o  o  Soundbites </li></ul><ul><l...
Soundbite Sample
Soundbites <ul><li>Are ‘atoms’ of information. </li></ul><ul><li>Commonly called ‘stops’ – or ‘starts’! </li></ul><ul><li>...
Soundtrack Sample
The Soundtrack <ul><li>Recalls original ‘linear’ audio tours. </li></ul><ul><li>Provides a sequential narrative and contex...
ArtBabble: the ideal interface http://www.artbabble.org/video/meet-william-christenberry
Identify soundtracks & soundbites Painting Sculpture Folk Art Architecture Dramatic change in style in display Why multipl...
Architecture Tour <ul><li>History of the building, style, architect </li></ul><ul><li>----------+--------------+----------...
Folk Art Tour <ul><li>Why is folk art, art? </li></ul><ul><li>----+-------------------+------------------+----------- </li...
How best to tell the story? <ul><li>Monologue: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Artists & curators </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Staff <...
<ul><li>Knowledgeable or insightful – trusted </li></ul><ul><li>Relates to the mission or key messages </li></ul><ul><li>G...
The right vehicle for your content Audio player Multimedia player Cellphone Personal media player Smart Mobile Browser pho...
http://picasaweb.google.com/anup.rao/HaifaAkkoIsrael#4954285426665324562
<ul><li>With many thanks to Kate Haley-Goldman and… </li></ul><ul><li>Mobile interpretation wikis </li></ul><ul><ul><li>ht...
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Thinking outside the audio tour box: Using front-end and formative evaluations to design new mobile experiences

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  • How many people have taken an audio or multimedia tour? Did they enjoy their experience?
  • Yet all too often, visitors complain that audio tours give them this sort of experience: http://geschiedenis.vpro.nl/themasites/mediaplayer/index.jsp?media=19799217&amp;refernr=19265092&amp;portalnr=4158511&amp;hostname=geschiedenis&amp;mediatype=video&amp;portalid=geschiedenis Although this video shows an example of one of the earliest tour technologies from the 1960s, excavated by Loic Tallon, the perception of audio tours is that they are not terribly different today in terms of inspiring a herd mentality among users, producing crowding around exhibits and a sort of dumbed-down, one-size-fits-all experience. All the issues that have plagued audio tours throughout their history are visible here: The linearity of the tour lead to a herd-mentality among visitors and crowding around exhibits In addition the challenges of: Hygiene: led to one of the earliest audio tour technology debates: headphones vs wands? Distribution issues always a challenge, but complexity also driven by technology choices, including the headphones or wand choice Very homogenous audience
  • Another way to represent this is as a multi-tiered architecture with up to three kinds of content: 1. -+-+-+-+-+ The Soundtrack 2. o o o o o The Soundbites 3. / | / | / Links
  • Museums are very good at soundbites: the wall label can be seen as a very basic, text-based soundbite. Although writing for the ear or video is not the same as writing for a label or catalogue, it is not such a huge task for museum staff to gain these skills and be able to produce good quality scripts for stops in-house. By contrast, you want a good storyteller writing your soundtracks if you don’t have someone as eloquent ‘off-the-cuff’ as Nicholas Serota!
  • What I like about this soundtrack; Given by the curator: visitors always like hearing from the expert, as long as s/he speaks relatively well! He gives us an overview with basic tools to understand Twombly’s work, both in this exhibition and beyond. He gives us a behind-the-scenes view, insight into what curation and the work of the museum is all about.
  • Reading the curator’s intention Keys to understanding the exhibition/display in its entirety Faster than reading (usually stops are slower than reading)
  • But both the Tate &amp; SFMOMA examples are linear media: not perhaps the best interface for accessing information on a mobile device, whether used inside the gallery or outside. ArtBabble offers a model for what could be an ideal interface for combining soundtrack, soundbites and links to third party content. It allows us to choose either to watch or hear a soundtrack overview of the exhibition or collection linearly, but also offers a notation system that can create ‘stops’ or soundbites at any point along that linear timeline. William Christenberry example Need to redefine 3 rd party content and think about it beyond ‘user-generated content’: e.g. SmartHistory.org
  • Thinking outside the audio tour box: Using front-end and formative evaluations to design new mobile experiences

    1. 1. Thinking outside the audio tour box: Nancy Proctor Smithsonian American Art Museum Using front-end and formative evaluations to design new mobile experiences
    2. 3. Fraunhofer Institute, Kunstmuseum Bonn: ‘Beat Zoderer’ exhibition (Listen project) 2003 Fraunhofer Institute, Kunstmuseum Bonn: ‘Beat Zoderer’ exhibition (Listen project) 2003 It’s NOT about the Technology
    3. 4. Thinking outside the audiotour box Means thinking about content & experience
    4. 5. Recent Research & Resources http://wiki.MuseumMobile.info/research <ul><li>2009 </li></ul><ul><li>CHNM survey on Museums and Mobile Adoption </li></ul><ul><li>International Survey on handheld use in museums. </li></ul><ul><li>2008 </li></ul><ul><li>Whitney Museum of American Art: Audio Guide Technologies Survey Final Report </li></ul><ul><li>2007 </li></ul><ul><li>Matthew Barney: Multiplatform interpretation at SFMOMA </li></ul><ul><li>La Placa Cohen Culture Track 2007 (with Antenna Audio) </li></ul>
    5. 6. Who is your target audience? <ul><li>Tied to mission & key messages </li></ul><ul><li>What are the desired outcomes? What do we want them to know, think and/or feel? </li></ul><ul><li>What platforms do they already use? How do they use them elsewhere & what excites them? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Traditional audio tours </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cellphones or smartphones </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Podcasts </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Mobile social media: SMS, Twitter, FB… </li></ul></ul>
    6. 7. A Minority of Visitors Use Technologies in the Galleries 2006 study by Randi Korn & Associates at SFMOMA BUT they use technology everywhere else: WWW = Whatever, Whenever, Wherever
    7. 8. Question mapping in the gallery: What do they want to know? <ul><li>Semi-structured interviews </li></ul><ul><li>FAQs and comments cards </li></ul><ul><li>Questions posed to staff… </li></ul>
    8. 9. Collecting questions… <ul><li>Online question collection: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Specialized Q&A services, e.g. AJOA </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Comments on social media sites </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Include audience research in order to segment </li></ul><ul><li>Go deeper with more experienced museum visitors </li></ul><ul><li>Where are visitors not being served by existing interpretation? </li></ul>
    9. 10. Organize & Filter <ul><li>Group questions: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Thematically </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>By object </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>By location </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Prioritize by mission and key messages </li></ul><ul><li>Prioritize questions that elicit great stories </li></ul>
    10. 11. Organize questions Painting Sculpture Folk Art Architecture Dramatic change in style in display Why multiples of same work? Lures aren’t art Story behind the architecture Triple painting?! Memory vessels: idea, ones with stones… Glad you dead you rascal you?!
    11. 12. Which content modalities? <ul><li>+ - + - + - + - + Soundtracks </li></ul><ul><li>o o o o Soundbites </li></ul><ul><li>x x x x Interactives </li></ul><ul><li>| | | Links </li></ul><ul><li>^ ^ ^ Feedback </li></ul><ul><li>§ § § Social media </li></ul>Narrowcast/ Offline or Networked Networked only
    12. 13. Soundbite Sample
    13. 14. Soundbites <ul><li>Are ‘atoms’ of information. </li></ul><ul><li>Commonly called ‘stops’ – or ‘starts’! </li></ul><ul><li>Facilitate going deeper on a specific object/subject. </li></ul><ul><li>Usually require a visual (actual object or image). </li></ul><ul><li>Can be collectable & portable to other platforms e.g. via bookmarking, saving or sharing. </li></ul><ul><li>Can be reused across the museum’s analog & digital platforms as well as those of third parties. </li></ul>
    14. 15. Soundtrack Sample
    15. 16. The Soundtrack <ul><li>Recalls original ‘linear’ audio tours. </li></ul><ul><li>Provides a sequential narrative and contextual information: tools for understanding the principles of the displays, both in the gallery and beyond . </li></ul><ul><li>Immersive, but may be divided into a number of connected segments. </li></ul><ul><li>‘ Downloaded’ for audiences on-site and beyond. </li></ul><ul><li>Like a good album, book or catalogue, should be possible to enjoy over & over again… </li></ul>
    16. 17. ArtBabble: the ideal interface http://www.artbabble.org/video/meet-william-christenberry
    17. 18. Identify soundtracks & soundbites Painting Sculpture Folk Art Architecture Dramatic change in style in display Why multiples of same work? Lures aren’t art Story behind the architecture Triple painting?! Memory vessels: idea, ones with stones… Glad you dead you rascal you?!
    18. 19. Architecture Tour <ul><li>History of the building, style, architect </li></ul><ul><li>----------+--------------+------------------+-------- </li></ul><ul><ul><li>O O O </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Tiles Skylights Ironwork </li></ul></ul>
    19. 20. Folk Art Tour <ul><li>Why is folk art, art? </li></ul><ul><li>----+-------------------+------------------+----------- </li></ul><ul><li>/ / / </li></ul><ul><li>O O O </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Lures Memory vessels Glad you dead… </li></ul></ul>
    20. 21. How best to tell the story? <ul><li>Monologue: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Artists & curators </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Staff </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Related experts </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Professional narrators </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Interview </li></ul><ul><li>Dialogue </li></ul><ul><li>Vox pop / comments </li></ul>
    21. 22. <ul><li>Knowledgeable or insightful – trusted </li></ul><ul><li>Relates to the mission or key messages </li></ul><ul><li>Good communicator with target audience </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Engaging voice </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Confident manner </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Makes it relevant </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Facilitates the desired outcomes </li></ul>Who best to tell the story?
    22. 23. The right vehicle for your content Audio player Multimedia player Cellphone Personal media player Smart Mobile Browser phones Mobile App Soundtrack x x (x) X X X Soundbite X X X x X X Interactive X X X Link X X x Feedback X X X Social media X X
    23. 24. http://picasaweb.google.com/anup.rao/HaifaAkkoIsrael#4954285426665324562
    24. 25. <ul><li>With many thanks to Kate Haley-Goldman and… </li></ul><ul><li>Mobile interpretation wikis </li></ul><ul><ul><li>http://wiki.museummobile.info/ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>http://museummobile.info/archives/category/podcasts </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>http://tatehandheldconference.pbworks.com/ </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Learning Times & the HandheldConference http://www.handheldconference.org/program/ </li></ul><ul><li>Beth Harris & Steven Zucker, SmartHistory http://SmartHistory.org </li></ul><ul><li>Koven Smith: http://www.archimuse.com/mw2009/papers/smith/smith.html & http://prezi.com/67549/ </li></ul><ul><li>SFMOMA (Peter Samis & Stephanie Pau): http://www.archimuse.com/mw2007/papers/samis/samis.html & http://www.archimuse.com/mw2009/papers/samis/samis.html </li></ul><ul><li>Nancy Proctor: [email_address] @nancyproctor http://MuseumMobile.info </li></ul>
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