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Social Networking and the Adolescent

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This presentatin is a class project for a class in Adolescent Psychology. Its target audience is parents, teachers and adolescents.

This presentatin is a class project for a class in Adolescent Psychology. Its target audience is parents, teachers and adolescents.

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  • The U.S. Census Bureau has released a 2010 report indicating these statistics.
  • This chart indicates a breakdown of Internet users by age. Teens and young adults are clearly the primary users of the Internet.
  • Adult use of the Internet has grown by 30%. Teen and young adult internet use has risen by 20%. These statistics prove that almost all of our young people use the Internet.
  • An August 2007 survey conducted by the National School Boards Association and Grunwald Associates LLC reveal these startling statistics and trends. The results of this study are discussed in an article posted on eSchool News: Technology News for Today’s K-20 Educator. The article, entitled “96 percent of teens use social-networking tools,” was posted on Oct. 18th, 2007. http://www.eschoolnews.com/2007/10/18/96-percent-of-teens-use-social-networking-tools/.
  • According to a survey conducted by OTX in April 2010, Facebook is the most popular social network for teens. Their survey sampled 600 teens aged thirteen to seventeen years old to understand teen’s experience with social networking. http://www.scribd.com/doc/33751159/Teens-Social-Networks-Study-June-2010
  • The survey conducted by the National School Boards Association and Grunwald Associates indicates that 60% of the students they studied said that they used social networking sites to discuss education related topics, and half of online students said they talk specifically about school work.
  • Identity development is the primary concern for teens. By creating and recreating a profile and participating in online banter, teens develop their decision making skills, discover socially acceptable ways to communicate, and try out new ways to express themselves in a somewhat anonymous environment. They can explore their perception of who they are and who they want to be.
  • The National School Boards Association recommends that school leaders should take a second look at their policies on social networking and begin exploring ways to use social networking sites for educational purposes. http://www.eschoolnews.com/2007/10/18/96-percent-of-teens-use-social-networking-tools/
  • Internet safety rules may include the following suggestions: 1. Do not give out personal information to ANYONE you do not know. 2. Do not assume that people are who they say they are. 3. Immediately end conversations that make you feel uncomfortable and report it to an adult. 4. Be critical of any information you gather online. 5. Harassment, obscene language, and sexual inferences are inappropriate online and off-line.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Social Networking SitesSocial Networking Sites and the Adolescentand the Adolescent By Nancy MarriottBy Nancy Marriott EPR 611/Adolescent PsychologyEPR 611/Adolescent Psychology
    • 2. Adolescent Use of SocialAdolescent Use of Social Networking SitesNetworking Sites Who’s OnlineWho’s Online Where They GoWhere They Go What They DoWhat They Do Who They Connect WithWho They Connect With How Do We Protect ThemHow Do We Protect Them
    • 3. The Rise of Internet UseThe Rise of Internet Use The U.S. population estimate for 2010 isThe U.S. population estimate for 2010 is 310,232,863310,232,863 77.3% (239,893,600) of the population use the77.3% (239,893,600) of the population use the InternetInternet 93% of all teens aged 12 -17 use the Internet93% of all teens aged 12 -17 use the Internet 93% of all young adults aged 18 - 29 use the93% of all young adults aged 18 - 29 use the InternetInternet
    • 4. Some Recent StatisticsSome Recent Statistics
    • 5. Significant IncreasesSignificant Increases 2000 -20092000 -2009  Teen Internet use roseTeen Internet use rose from 74% to 93%from 74% to 93%  Young adult (18 – 29 yrs.Young adult (18 – 29 yrs. old) Internet use roseold) Internet use rose from 73% to 93%from 73% to 93%  Internet use for all adultsInternet use for all adults rose from 53% to 74%rose from 53% to 74%
    • 6. How Are Adolescents Using theHow Are Adolescents Using the Internet?Internet? Social NetworkingSocial Networking Information GatheringInformation Gathering Video/Content SharingVideo/Content Sharing Chat forumsChat forums E-MailE-Mail GamingGaming Online PurchasingOnline Purchasing
    • 7. Social Networking at the ForefrontSocial Networking at the Forefront Adolescents use social networking sites far more than anyAdolescents use social networking sites far more than any other tool available on the internet.other tool available on the internet. Ninety-six percent of teens ages nine to seventeen whoNinety-six percent of teens ages nine to seventeen who have internet access use social networking tools.have internet access use social networking tools. Teens spend almost as much time using social networkingTeens spend almost as much time using social networking sites as they spend watching television.sites as they spend watching television.
    • 8. Popular Teen Social Networking SitesPopular Teen Social Networking Sites Social Networking SiteSocial Networking Site % of Teens that Have a% of Teens that Have a Profile and Use ItProfile and Use It % of Teens that% of Teens that Have/Had a Profile butHave/Had a Profile but Stopped Using ItStopped Using It 1. Facebook1. Facebook 69%69% 9%9% 2. YouTube2. YouTube 64%64% 15%15% 3. MySpace3. MySpace 41%41% 22%22% 4. Twitter4. Twitter 20%20% 15%15% 5. Windows Live Spaces5. Windows Live Spaces 16%16% 7%7% 6. Pandora6. Pandora 15%15% 6%6% 7. Gaia Online7. Gaia Online 14%14% 13%13% 8. Club Penguin8. Club Penguin 13%13% 24%24% 9. Bebo9. Bebo 5%5% 10%10% 10. Hi510. Hi5 4%4% 5%5%
    • 9. Top Teen Social SitesTop Teen Social Sites
    • 10. What Do Teens Do on SocialWhat Do Teens Do on Social Networking Sites?Networking Sites?  Connect with current friends to deepen andConnect with current friends to deepen and extend relationshipsextend relationships  Discuss education related topics and collaborateDiscuss education related topics and collaborate with others about educational projects andwith others about educational projects and creative activitiescreative activities  Reach out to others with similar interestsReach out to others with similar interests  Make new friendsMake new friends  Access information and seek adviceAccess information and seek advice
    • 11. Benefits of Social Networking SitesBenefits of Social Networking Sites 1. An intimate atmosphere where teens connect and1. An intimate atmosphere where teens connect and discuss personal issues in positive waysdiscuss personal issues in positive ways 2. A social outlet for isolated/disenfranchised teens2. A social outlet for isolated/disenfranchised teens 3. A wider network of peers with common interests3. A wider network of peers with common interests 4. Social networking sites encourage identity development4. Social networking sites encourage identity development 5. A place to seek advice and information from other5. A place to seek advice and information from other teens who are facing health issues or social problemsteens who are facing health issues or social problems 6. Emotional support from peers6. Emotional support from peers
    • 12. Creative/Educational Benefits ofCreative/Educational Benefits of Social Networking SitesSocial Networking Sites  Teens share self-created writing, art, photography,Teens share self-created writing, art, photography, video and music with their peers.video and music with their peers.  Students collaborate on school projects and discussStudents collaborate on school projects and discuss school assignments.school assignments.  Adolescents explore academic subjects with classmatesAdolescents explore academic subjects with classmates as well as students from other schools, cities andas well as students from other schools, cities and countries.countries.  Students discuss college planning, learning outside ofStudents discuss college planning, learning outside of school, and careers.school, and careers.
    • 13. Potential Dangers of SocialPotential Dangers of Social NetworkingNetworking  Exposure to harassment and bullyingExposure to harassment and bullying  Exposure to sexual advances and inappropriateExposure to sexual advances and inappropriate sexual behaviorsexual behavior  Teens may become targeted by pedophilesTeens may become targeted by pedophiles  Identity theftIdentity theft  Displaying personal and/or risky behaviors in aDisplaying personal and/or risky behaviors in a public forumpublic forum
    • 14. Cyber-bullying and AdolescentsCyber-bullying and Adolescents Cyber-bullying Can TakeCyber-bullying Can Take Many FormsMany Forms  Publicizing private instantPublicizing private instant messages, text messages, or e-mailmessages, text messages, or e-mail  Posting threatening messagesPosting threatening messages  Posting photos that will causePosting photos that will cause embarrassmentembarrassment  Spreading rumorsSpreading rumors
    • 15. Teens and On-Line PredatorsTeens and On-Line Predators  Adolescents may disclose tooAdolescents may disclose too much personal information.much personal information.  Vulnerable teens may engageVulnerable teens may engage in conversations with strangersin conversations with strangers posing as other teens.posing as other teens.  Online romances develop inOnline romances develop in isolation, allowing theisolation, allowing the pedophile an opportunity topedophile an opportunity to gain trust, personalgain trust, personal information, and possibleinformation, and possible physical access to teens.physical access to teens.
    • 16. How Can We Protect Them?How Can We Protect Them? 1. Make sure computers are located in common1. Make sure computers are located in common areas of the house.areas of the house. 2. Monitor your teens and the sites they visit.2. Monitor your teens and the sites they visit. 3. Educate your adolescent about internet safety3. Educate your adolescent about internet safety rules.rules. 4. Talk to teens about cyber-bullying and encourage4. Talk to teens about cyber-bullying and encourage them to talk to you.them to talk to you. 5. Encourage teens to use an alias on social5. Encourage teens to use an alias on social networking sites.networking sites. 6. Find out what privacy protections are available6. Find out what privacy protections are available and use themand use them..
    • 17. ReferencesReferences Lenhart, A., Purcell, K., Smith, A., & Zickuhr, K. (2010). Social media and young adults.Lenhart, A., Purcell, K., Smith, A., & Zickuhr, K. (2010). Social media and young adults. Pew Internet: A Project of the Pew Research Center’s Internet and American Life Project.Pew Internet: A Project of the Pew Research Center’s Internet and American Life Project. AvailableAvailable atat www.pewinternet.orgwww.pewinternet.org Mitchell, K. J. & Ybarra, M. (2009). Social networking sites: Finding a balance betweenMitchell, K. J. & Ybarra, M. (2009). Social networking sites: Finding a balance between their risks and benefits.their risks and benefits. Archives of Pediatric & Adolescent MedicineArchives of Pediatric & Adolescent Medicine, 163 (1), 87-89., 163 (1), 87-89. Moreno, M. A., Parks, M. R., Zimmerman, F. J., Brito, T. E., & Christakis, D. A. (2009).Moreno, M. A., Parks, M. R., Zimmerman, F. J., Brito, T. E., & Christakis, D. A. (2009). Display of health risk behaviors on MySpace by adolescents.Display of health risk behaviors on MySpace by adolescents. Archives of Pediatric &Archives of Pediatric & Adolescent MedicineAdolescent Medicine, 163 (1), 27-34., 163 (1), 27-34. Tynes, B. M. (2007). Internet safety gone wild? Sacrificing the educational andTynes, B. M. (2007). Internet safety gone wild? Sacrificing the educational and psychosocial benefits of online social environments.psychosocial benefits of online social environments. Journal of Adolescent ResearchJournal of Adolescent Research, 22 (6),, 22 (6), 575-584. doi:10.1177/0743558407303979575-584. doi:10.1177/0743558407303979 Wolak, J., Finkelhor, D., Mitchell, K. J., & Ybarra, M. L. (2008). Online predators andWolak, J., Finkelhor, D., Mitchell, K. J., & Ybarra, M. L. (2008). Online predators and their victims: Myths, realities, and implications for prevention and treatment.their victims: Myths, realities, and implications for prevention and treatment. AmericanAmerican PsychologistPsychologist, 63 (2), 111-128. doi: 10.1037/0003-066x63.2.111, 63 (2), 111-128. doi: 10.1037/0003-066x63.2.111