Your SlideShare is downloading. ×

Geg2509 pres 2009

53

Published on

Presentation given to a second year geography class on regional geography of Canada.

Presentation given to a second year geography class on regional geography of Canada.

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
53
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. The library and the Canadian Census February 2th, 2009 By Nancy Lemay Geographic, Statistical and Government Information Centre (GSG) © 2009 University of Ottawa
  • 2. February 2th, 2009 – gsg@uottawa.ca Presentation Outline • Introducing the library and the Geographic, Statistical and Government Information Centre (GSG) • Census History: – When did it begin? – Evolution through time – It’s original state • Access statistics: – Summary tables on StatCan website – Census statistics through E-STAT • Contact information
  • 3. February 2th, 2009 – gsg@uottawa.ca The Library at UO • 1st floor reference desk or GSG reference desk – 3rd floor • Wireless internet connection in the library • Laptop loans – 3 hrs loan • 250 PCs in the Morisset library
  • 4. February 2th, 2009 – gsg@uottawa.ca The Library at UO • A tutorial developed to help you discover and use numerous resources available at the Library. • You can attend numerous free 40-minute drop-in hands-on workshop, focusing on specific tools available at the library.
  • 5. February 2th, 2009 – gsg@uottawa.ca Services available at the GSG centre… Provide help to access and use: • Geographic Information: geospatial data, satellite imagery, maps, atlases and air photos; • Statistics and data: survey data and statistics from statistical and administrative agencies, e.g., Statistics Canada (DLI); • Government Information: printed documents and electronic products from governments in Canada and around the world.
  • 6. February 2th, 2009 – gsg@uottawa.ca Census History
  • 7. February 2th, 2009 – gsg@uottawa.ca Census History • Canada's first census initiated by Jean Talon in 1666 • Talon did much of the data collection personally • The census counted the colony's 3,215 inhabitants and recorded their age, sex, marital status and occupation. • In 1739, last census under the French regime.
  • 8. February 2th, 2009 – gsg@uottawa.ca Census History (cont’d) • Between 1710 and 1760 need to collect information on housing stock and armaments (muskets and swords). • Previous censuses had been more concerned with raising taxes or armies and assessing resources. • In 1765 for example, assessing the balance between Catholics and Protestants, and recording the number of Acadians, settlers, Indians and Blacks. • New variables on race, religion and ethnic origin were introduced.
  • 9. February 2th, 2009 – gsg@uottawa.ca Census History (cont’d) • The first national census of Canada was taken in 1871 • The first census conducted under the British North American Act. • According to The Census Act of May 12, 1870, census-taking was to take place no later than May 1st. • In 1871 asked 211 questions on area, land holdings, vital statistics, religion, education, administration, the military, justice, agriculture, commerce, industry and finance. • The 1871 Census began a tradition, collect information on the ancestral origins of all Canadians, including Aboriginal persons.
  • 10. February 2th, 2009 – gsg@uottawa.ca Census History (cont’d) • In 1871, the only options for "marital status" were married, widowed or other. – Today there are five categories: legally married, separated but still legally married, divorced, widowed, or single (never married). • From 1871 to 1911, the census asked questions on "infirmities." Respondents were asked to indicate whether members of their household were blind, deaf, or simple-minded. – These questions were dropped from the 1921 and subsequent censuses.
  • 11. February 2th, 2009 – gsg@uottawa.ca Census History (cont’d) • Two major changes were made to the census in 1881: – Oath of secrecy, a pledge still required today. – The census was extended to include British Columbia, Manitoba and Prince Edward Island. – Housing question was revised to include "wigwams and tents" in the Census of the North-West Territories.
  • 12. February 2th, 2009 – gsg@uottawa.ca Census History (cont’d) • The 1901 Census grew from nine questionnaires and 216 questions in 1891 to 11 questionnaires and 561 questions. • By this time the population of Canada was 5,371,051, and Montreal was the most populous city with 267,730 residents. • The 1911 Census had 13 questionnaires with 522 questions. – No longer include the detailed fishery questionnaire with questions such as the quantity, kind, and value of catch; and the number and type of boats, gear and equipment. – Instead, a special form was used in specified fishing areas of Canada.
  • 13. February 2th, 2009 – gsg@uottawa.ca Census History (cont’d) • In 1906, the prairie provinces of Manitoba, Alberta and Saskatchewan began to take a separate census of agriculture every five years to monitor the growth of the West. • Since 1956, the Census of Agriculture and the Census of Population have been taken together every five years across the entire country.
  • 14. February 2th, 2009 – gsg@uottawa.ca Census History (cont’d) • In 1912, responsibility for the census shifted from the Ministry of Agriculture to the Ministry of Trade and Commerce. • Six years later, the Dominion Bureau of Statistics was created.
  • 15. February 2th, 2009 – gsg@uottawa.ca Census History (cont’d) • The 1921 Census had only five questionnaires: – The population questionnaire contained only 35 questions – Questions on "insanity" and fertility are dropped. – Mandatory school attendance until age 16.
  • 16. February 2th, 2009 – gsg@uottawa.ca Census History (cont’d) • In the 1931 Census, questions were asked to gauge the extent and severity of unemployment and to analyze its causes. – The era of the Great Depression. – By the 1930s women had fewer than 3 children. – The proportion of lone parent families reached a level that would not be surpassed until 1996.
  • 17. February 2th, 2009 – gsg@uottawa.ca Census History (cont’d) • The 1941 Census, developed in the Depression and conducted during the Second World War. – Women joined the labour force during the war. – Following the war, higher divorce and remarriage rates. • This was the first census that linked the urban poor with a view to developing urban planning.
  • 18. February 2th, 2009 – gsg@uottawa.ca Census History (cont’d) • In 1951, the sample was expanded to one household in five in order to obtain greater geographic detail. • Inclusion of questions on fertility (topic considered too sensitive for the 1921 and 1931 censuses). – From 1946-1965, known as the « baby-boom ». – Fertility was correlated to earnings, schooling and other significant characteristics of the family. – Woman had approx. 3.9 children on average. – Younger age at marriage.
  • 19. February 2th, 2009 – gsg@uottawa.ca Census History (cont’d) • In 1956, the first nationwide quinquennial census was conducted. – Television use in its publicity program. – Rapid growth in population and agriculture indicated the need for benchmarks at five-year intervals. – Develop a simplified questionnaire restricted to the essentials so as not to exceed the allocated budget.
  • 20. February 2th, 2009 – gsg@uottawa.ca Census History (cont’d) • Birth control pill became available in the early 1960s, but not legalized until 1969. • Introduction of the Divorce Act in 1968. • Obtain a divorce to include « no fault » divorce following a separation of at least three years.
  • 21. February 2th, 2009 – gsg@uottawa.ca Census History (cont’d) • By 1971, the Dominion Bureau of Statistics had become Statistics Canada. • Last census year that fertility was at the replacement level. • Under the new Statistics Act, it became a statutory requirement to hold censuses of population and agriculture every five years. • Self-enumeration, whereby respondents complete their own questionnaire.
  • 22. February 2th, 2009 – gsg@uottawa.ca Census History (cont’d) • The 1986 Census broke the pattern established in 1956 of alternating full and mini-censuses by repeating most of the questions asked in the full census of 1981. • The term "head" which previously referred to the husband was changed in 1976 to either the husband or wife. • The reference to "head" was dropped altogether in the 1981 Census. • First question that included common-law couple.
  • 23. February 2th, 2009 – gsg@uottawa.ca Census History (cont’d) • In 1986, the Divorce Act was amended to reduce the separation for « no fault » divorce to at least one year. • In 1987, saw a record high divorce rate!! • In 1991 a question on "common-law" relationship was included on the census questionnaire for the first time.
  • 24. February 2th, 2009 – gsg@uottawa.ca Census History (cont’d) • In 2001: – The short questionnaire completed by 80% of households. – The long questionnaire contains the same questions as the short form plus 52 additional questions. – Completed by the remaining 20% of the population. – Provide data for common-law couples (opposite sex) and common- law couples (same sex), with and without children living at home. – Same-sex marriage became legal across Canada in 2005. – We have grown from 3,215 inhabitants to a nation of almost 31 million.
  • 25. February 2th, 2009 – gsg@uottawa.ca Census History (cont’d) • Same-sex married couples were first enumerated in the 2006 census. • In 2006, for the first time, households across the country had the convenience of completing their questionnaire online. • This new method places Canada at the forefront of census taking. • In the past 40 years, Canada's population has doubled, from just over 14 million in 1951 to 30 million in 2001.
  • 26. February 2th, 2009 – gsg@uottawa.ca Evolution of the census questions • Census questions since confederation: http://www12.statcan.ca/english/census06/reference/dictionary/app001.c • Census questions changes through time: http://www12.statcan.ca/english/census06/reference/dictionary/defbyqnu
  • 27. February 2th, 2009 – gsg@uottawa.ca Access statistics on StatCan website http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html
  • 28. February 2th, 2009 – gsg@uottawa.ca Access statistics on StatCan website (cont’d)
  • 29. February 2th, 2009 – gsg@uottawa.ca Access statistics on StatCan website (cont’d)
  • 30. February 2th, 2009 – gsg@uottawa.ca Access statistics on StatCan website (cont’d)
  • 31. February 2th, 2009 – gsg@uottawa.ca Accessing statistics through E-STAT
  • 32. February 2th, 2009 – gsg@uottawa.ca Accessing statistics through E-STAT
  • 33. February 2th, 2009 – gsg@uottawa.ca Accessing statistics through E-STAT
  • 34. February 2th, 2009 – gsg@uottawa.ca Accessing statistics through E-STAT
  • 35. February 2th, 2009 – gsg@uottawa.ca Accessing statistics through E-STAT
  • 36. February 2th, 2009 – gsg@uottawa.ca Important links • How to cite Statistics Canada Products • UO citation manager: RefWorks – Web-based bibliography manager. – Use Refworks to maintain a personal database of references to articles. – Share references with other students at UO. • Library subject guides – contact subject librarian for help…
  • 37. February 2th, 2009 – gsg@uottawa.ca Contact Information Nancy lemay GIS and Geography Librarian The Geographic, Statistical and Government Information Centre Location: Morisset, 3rd floor, Room 308 Website: http://www.biblio.uottawa.ca/gsg E-mail address: nlemay@uottawa.ca

×