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The Challenge of Ensuring Teacher Quality and Supply
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The Challenge of Ensuring Teacher Quality and Supply

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The Challenge of Ensuring Teacher Quality and Supply The Challenge of Ensuring Teacher Quality and Supply Presentation Transcript

  • The Challenge of Ensuring Teacher Quality and Supply Nancy A. Doorey Presented to:Pennsylvania Conference on Teacher Quality and Supply Issues September 26, 2002
  • One-Year Effects of Different Teachers on Low Achieving StudentsAverage Student Gains over One Year 60 53 50 Least Effective 40 Teachers (bottom 20%) 30 Expected Annual Gain: 25 points Most Effective 20 Teachers (top 14 20%) 10 0 Least Most Sanders & Rivers, 1996
  • Three-Year Teacher Effects 20 76% 76% 10Student Percentile Scores 0 6 0 Least Effectiv e -10 Teachers MATH READING Most Effective T eachers -20 42% -30 27% Dallas, TX: Jordan Mnendro & Weerasinghe, -40 1997. View slide
  • Performance on Graduation Test Linked to Effectiveness of Teachers 100 -- 76 - 100%Predicted Competency Means 90 4th grade 80 -- 51 - 75% PASS 4th grade 70 -- 26 - 50% 60 4th grade 50 -- 0 - 25 % 40 4th grade Low Avg. High Effectivess Levels of 4 Consecutive Teachers View slide
  • Teacher Quality in PA  New policies enacted: • Higher basic verbal and math skills (PRAXIS)
  • Long-Range Effects of Low-Scoring and High- Scoring Teachers on Student Achievement 2 1.5(standard deviation Student Score 1 Low teachers, 0.5 high students units) 0 1 3 5 7 9 11 High teachers, -0.5 low students -1 -1.5 -2 Grades 1 - 11 Ferguson & Brown, 1998
  • Teacher Quality in PA, cont’d • Increased content knowledge for secondary teachers • 1 year induction • On-going professional development
  • Teacher Supply in PA PA has annual surplus of teachers • 10,500 new graduates • 4,000 vacancies Shortages by geographic location and certification area
  • Emergency Permits in PA,2001-2002 (Type 01- vacancy) Elementary Educ. 1,994 Mentally/Phys. Handicapped 961 Mathematics 190 Spanish 171 English 100 Early childhood 94 Chemistry 89 PA Dept. of Education, August 2002
  • Emergency PermitsIncreasing in PA Emergency Permits in PA Type 01 Vacancy in Classroom 5000 4500 4320 4000 3814 number of teachers 3500 3000 2500 2000 1500 1000 953 500 0 1999-00 2000-01 2001-02 PA DOE, August 2002
  • Impact on Urban Children Philadelphia: every 7th classroom York: every 10th classroom Harrisburg: every 10th classroom has a teacher on emergency permit. PA DOE, August, 2002
  • Unequal Access toEffective Teachers 31% of schools in PA are high-poverty schools These schools enroll 25% of PA students 11% of teachers in these schools are first-year teachers, and 39% have five years of experience or less PA DOE 2002 profiles
  • Teacher transfers increaseproblem of equity Teacher Transfers in Texas, 1993-1996 for Teachers Who Moved from Urban to Suburban Schools 20 14 15 Change in 10 Schools Average % Percent Change 5 Poverty 0 Change in -5 Schools -10 Average -15 Student Achievement -20 Level -25 -24.3 -30
  • Challenges Ahead in PA High school enrollment projected to increase by 17,000 students over 5 years in PA, and by 114,000 in contiguous states Teacher graduates down by 15.9% over past five years, and increased standards may reduce supply further Roughly half of PA students do not meet state standards in reading and math 256 schools in PA and 1,714 in contiguous states were listed as “in School Improvement” under NCLB
  • The Regional Context Increased HS enrollment Number schools in NCLB School Improvement +34,000 % secondary students 529 52% meeting state standards +17,000 256 48% +52,000 +18,000 274 12% 760 12% +1,000 -1,000 20 45% 13 +10,000 118 56%NCES, Oct. 2002 US DOE July 1, 2002 State Web sites, gr. 8-11
  • NCES Projected Enrollment Increase For Grades 9 - 12 2001 - 2006 More than 40% of secondary students are 90,000 not meeting current state standards 80,000 80,000Projected increase in enrollment 70,000 60,000 52,000 48,000 50,000 40,000 34,000 30,000 17,000 18,000 15,000 20,000 10,000 10,000 1,000 0 DE MD PA OH NY NJ NC SC TX
  • How will schools and districts respond to increased pressure to raise achievement?
  • Questions forPolicymakers How can each state improve teacher quality while ensuring adequate supply? Are states better off pursuing teacher quality competitively or cooperatively? In which areas would regional collaboration add value?
  • The Mid-Atlantic Regional Teacher ProjectMARTP Priorities1. Create full regional reciprocity, especially for experienced teachers3. Raise standards for teacher licensure in coordinated fashion5. Create Meritorious New Teacher certificate based on highest standards
  • The Mid-Atlantic Regional Teacher ProjectMARTP Priorities1. Coordinate electronic hiring halls and promote use3. Collaborate on data collection, labor market tracking, and evaluation of strategies
  • Our shared goal: A high quality teacher for every classroom, every child.